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Tizen News: Phones and TVs

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Linux
  • Tizen 3.0-powered Samsung Z4 now available with offline retailers in india

    The Samsung Z4, the fourth smartphone in Samsung’s Z series and a successor to the Z2 (and not the Z3, as many would assume), has been formally announced and made an appearance at the Tizen Developer Conference (TDC 2017) this past week. The Z4 was rumoured to make its way to India on May 19th (Friday) and it did – arriving with offline retailers after launching in the country last Monday (one week ago).

  • Samsung 2017 QLED TVs World First to support autocalibration for HDR
  • Samsung approves You.i TV video platform for Tizen TV app development

    While Samsung has developed Tizen TV apps using JavaScript, You.i TV’s Engine Video app runs on Native Client (NACL), a web technology that does not only allows C++ applications to run in a standard browser but is said to be 24 times faster than JavaScript. Now that Samsung has approved You.i TV’s video engine platform, developers can craft more video content for Tizen Smart TV owners.

  • Samsung Smart TV gets a new Glympse app that enables location sharing on the TV

    Samsung Smart TV, powered by the intuitive, self-developed Tizen operating system, has gotten a cool new app which enables consumers to view the location of their friends, loved ones or even a pizza delivery or cable technician in real-time directly from their home’s largest screen. The new app is developed by Glympse, the leading real-time location services platform.

How To Encrypt DNS Traffic In Linux Using DNSCrypt

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Linux

​Dnscrypt is a protocol that is used to improve DNS security by authenticating communications between a DNS client and a DNS resolver. DNSCrypt prevents DNS spoofing. It uses cryptographic signatures to verify that responses originate from the chosen DNS resolver and haven’t been tampered with. DNSCrypt is available for multi-platforms including Windows, MacOS, Unix, Android, iOS, Linux and even routers.

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Kernel Space: HMM, Cloud Native, Linux 4.12, TFS, Linux 4.11.2, and 4.10 EoL

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Linux
  • Faster machine learning is coming to the Linux kernel

    Heterogenous memory management (HMM) allows a device’s driver to mirror the address space for a process under its own memory management. As Red Hat developer Jérôme Glisse explains, this makes it easier for hardware devices like GPUs to directly access the memory of a process without the extra overhead of copying anything. It also doesn't violate the memory protection features afforded by modern OSes.

  • Product Development in the Age of Cloud Native

    Ever since the mass adoption of Agile development techniques and devops philosophies that attempt to eradication organizational silos, there’s been a welcome discussion on how to optimize development for continuous delivery on a massive scale. Some of the better known adages that have taken root as a result of this shift include “deploy in production after checking in code” (feasible due to the rigorous upfront testing required in this model), “infrastructure as code”, and a host of others that, taken out of context, would lead one down the path of chaos and mayhem. Indeed, the shift towards devops and agile methodologies and away from “waterfall” has led to a much needed evaluation of all processes around product and service delivery that were taken as a given in the very recent past.

  • Running Intel Kabylake Graphics On Linux 4.12
  • TFS File-System Still Aiming To Compete With ZFS, Written In Rust

    The developers behind the Rust-based Redox operating system continue working on the "TFS" file-system that they hope will compete with the long-standing ZFS file-system, but TFS isn't being tied to just Redox OS.

  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Reached End of Life, Users Urged to Move to Linux 4.11 Series

    Greg Kroah-Hartman informed the Linux community about the release and immediate availability of the seventeenth maintenance update to the Linux 4.10 kernel series, which also marked the end of life.

  • Linux Kernel 4.11.2 Has Many F2FS and CIFS Improvements, Lots of Updated Drivers

CloudReady - Chromebook re-experienced

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GNU
Linux
Google

I haven't done any extensive testing, but then, how much testing is really needed to run a bunch of Web apps. The whole idea is to have this cloud-based operating system, with easy, flexible access to your data anywhere you go. So if you judge this from the perspective of a typical desktop, you miss the point.

But that is the point. When I install something on a desktop-like form factor, I expect its behavior to match. CloudReady takes you away from that experience, and the transition is not comfortable. You feel very limited. This makes a lot of sense for schools, for instance, where you do want to lock down the devices, and make them simple for reuse. In a home setup, why would you go for just cloud, when you can have that plus any which desktop application on a typical system? After all, nothing prevents you from launching a browser and using Google applications, side by side with your desktop stuff. It's the same thing.

The notion of reviving old hardware is a bit of a wishful thinking. My eeePC test shows that it gets completely crippled when you run HD content in either Firefox or Chrome. An operating system based on Chromium OS will not drastically change that. It cannot do that. Maybe you will have better performance than having Windows there, the same way I opted for a Linux setup on the Asus netbook, but there are physical limits to what old hardware can accomplish.

And then, there's the whole question of cloud ... Most people might be comfy with this, after having used smartphones for a while, but I don't think this is anything novel or mindblowing. CloudReady works as advertised, it's a very cool concept, but ultimately, it gives you a browser on steroids. Google and Neverware have their own agenda for doing this, but for home users, there really isn't any added value in transforming their keyboard-and-mouse box into a browsing portal. So if you ask me, am I ready for the cloud, the answer is, only when it becomes sophisticated enough to match my productivity and freedom of creativity. And for you, do you want a simple, locked down, secure and entirely Google machine that isn't a mobile phone or a dedicated piece of hardware? The answer is 42.

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Imagine an Android Phone Without Linux Inside

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Android
Linux
Google

Google Fuchsia first saw the light of day in the summer of 2016 as an unannounced bit of code posted on GitHub. Now, in May 2017, the word is being spread by so many tech news outlets that we don’t have room to list them all.

The Fuchsia demo app is called Armadillo, and you’re free to build it for yourself. We even found an article for you titled How to build Fuchsia Armadillo for Android in case you want to see how Fuchsia looks on your own Android phone or tablet.

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Intel’s “Euclid” robotics compute module on sale for $399

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Linux
Hardware

Intel has launched its “Euclid” robotics compute module, which runs Ubuntu on an Atom x7-Z8700, and offers a RealSense 3D cam, WiFi, and sensors.

When Intel demonstrated its Intel Euclid robotics controller at last August’s Intel Developer Conference, the company gave no indication of its release date or even if it would be more than a proof of concept. The candy-bar sized module is now available for order as part of a $399 Intel Euclid Development Kit, with shipments due by the end of the month. A Euclid community site has gone live with tutorials and documentation.

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Top 10 Linux distros for developers in 2017

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Development
GNU
Linux

More popular versions of Linux such as Ubuntu focus on enhancing the user experience by automatically updating packages and providing flashy, resource-heavy GUIs.

While user-friendly distributions (distros) certainly have their place, in this guide, we've tried to get back to the glory days when developers would customise their Linux build. These Linux distros allow you to fine-tune your development environment so whether you're a veteran programmer or relative newcomer, you can get on with your coding.

In short, whatever your programming preferences, you’ll find a distro to suit your needs in this top 10 roundup.

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Linux Releases: 4.11.2, 4.10.17, 4.9.29, 4.4.69, 3.18.53 and 3.18.54

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Linux

Parrot Security and Ethical Hacking OS Will Support the Pinebook Linux Laptop

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GNU
Linux

The development team behind the Parrot Security OS announced the official availability of the 3.6 release, a maintenance update that focuses on reliability and stability of the security-oriented operating system for ethical hacking.

Parrot Security OS 3.6 has been in development for the past two and a half months, and while it may not introduce any major new features, it attempts to improve the build platform and various key components of the operating system to make it better, more reliable and less resource hungry.

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Arduino shows off LoRa gateway and node shields

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Linux
Hardware

Arduino is prepping a “LoRa Gateway Kit” to bring LoRa wireless to its Linux-driven Arduino Tian, plus a “LoRa Node Kit” for the Arduino Primo.

At the Maker Faire Bay Area, Arduino showcased its new Arduino LoRa Gateway and LoRa Node shields that run on Arduino boards. Due to arrive later this year, the boards will be offered in a LoRa Gateway Shield Kit for the Linino Linux-enabled Arduino Tian, and a LoRa Node Shield Kit designed for the Arduino Primo or other Arduinos with at least 32KB of flash.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices: Raspberry Pi, PIC32, Lime Micro

  • Apollo Lake COM Express module has onboard microSD and eMMC
    The COM Express Compact Type 6 “MSC C6C-AL” taps Intel’s Apollo Lake and offers up to 16GB DDR3L, microSD and optional eMMC, plus support for 5x PCIe slots.
  • How to create an Internet-in-a-Box on a Raspberry Pi
    If you're a homeschool parent or a teacher with a limited budget, Internet-in-a-Box might be just what you've been looking for. Its hardware requirements are very modest—a Raspberry Pi 3, a 64GB microSD card, and a power supply—but it provides access to a wealth of educational resources, even to students without internet access in the most remote areas of the world.
  • Squeeze Pi: Adventures in home audio
    The Squeezebox Touch provided a family-friendly interface to access our music library, either directly on the device or via a range of mobile applications. Logitech discontinued its development in 2012, but I was happy as they open sourced the Squeezebox's server software as Logitech Media Server and supplied the open source code used on the physical Squeezebox devices.
  • Evaluating PIC32 for Hardware Experiments
    PIC32 uses the MIPS32 instruction set. Since MIPS has been around for a very long time, and since the architecture was prominent in workstations, servers and even games consoles in the late 1980s and 1990s, remaining in widespread use in more constrained products such as routers as this century has progressed, the GNU toolchain (GCC, binutils) has had a long time to comfortably support MIPS. Although the computer you are using is not particularly likely to be MIPS-based, cross-compiling versions of these tools can be built to run on, say, x86 or x86-64 while generating MIPS32 executable programs.
  • Want a Raspberry Pi-powered PC? This $50 case turns the Pi into a desktop
    As long as you keep your expectations in check, it's perfectly feasible to run the latest Raspberry Pi as a desktop computer. However, the base Raspberry Pi 3 is a bare bones board, so anyone wanting to set it up as a desktop PC will need to buy their own case and other add-ons.
  • Open source LimeNET SDR computers run Ubuntu Core on Intel Core
    Lime Micro has launched three open source “LimeNET” SDR systems that run Ubuntu Core on Intel Core CPUs, including one with a new LimeSDR QPCIe board. Lime Microsystems has gone to Crowd Supply to launch three fully open source LimeNET computers for software defined radio (SDR) applications. The systems run Ubuntu “Snappy” Core Linux on Intel’s Core processors, enabling access to an open, community-based LimeSDR App Store using the Ubuntu Core snap packaging and update technology. The SDR processing is handled by three variations on last year’s open source LimeSDR board, which run Intel’s (Altera) Cyclone IV FPGA.

Android Leftovers

Server: Data Centres, Google, SDN, Amazon, and Microsoft

  • Data Center Networking Performance: New Apps Bring New Requirements
    Large cloud services providers such as Amazon, Google, Baidu, and Tencent have reinvented the way in which IT services can be delivered, with capabilities that go beyond scale in terms of sheer size to also include scale as it pertains to speed and agility. That’s put traditional carriers on notice: John Donovan, chief strategy officer and group president at AT&T technology and operations, for instance, said last year that AT&T wants to be the “most aggressive IT company in the world.” He noted that in a world where over-the-top (OTT) offerings have become commonplace, application and services development can no longer be defined by legacy processes.
  • Google Reveals a Powerful New AI Chip and Supercomputer
    The announcement reflects how rapidly artificial intelligence is transforming Google itself, and it is the surest sign yet that the company plans to lead the development of every relevant aspect of software and hardware. Perhaps most importantly, for those working in machine learning at least, the new processor not only executes at blistering speed, it can also be trained incredibly efficiently. Called the Cloud Tensor Processing Unit, the chip is named after Google’s open-source TensorFlow machine-learning framework.
  • Google's AlphaGo AI is about to face off against the world's best Go player

    This week, the matter will be settled once and for all. Ke Jie and AlphaGo will face off in a three-game match in Wuzhen, China, as part of the Future of Go Summit being held by Google.

  • Keynote: Cloud Native Networking- Amin Vahdat, Fellow & Technical Lead For Networking, Google
  • Google's Networking Lead Talks SDN Challenges for the Next Decade
  • Peace, love and SDN
    Virtualization has been a blessing for data centers – thanks to the humble hypervisor, we can create, move and rearrange computers on a whim, without thinking about the physical infrastructure. The simplicity and efficiency of VMs has prompted network engineers to envision a programmable, flexible network based on open protocols and REST APIs that could be managed from a single interface, without worrying about each router and switch.
  • Bryan Cantrill on Integrity

    Amazon has 14 leadership principles and integrity is not on it.

  • Bankrupt school ITT pleads 'don't let Microsoft wipe our cloud data!'
    The estate of bankrupt US trade school ITT Technical Institutes is today asking a court to stop Microsoft from erasing its cloud data. In a filing [PDF] to the US District Bankruptcy Court of Southern Indiana, the caretakers of the defunct for-profit university seek an order to bar the Redmond giant from wiping the contents of ITT's Office 365 and webmail accounts for students, faculty, and administrators.

Security Leftovers: WannaCry, Windows in Linux, Windows 7, Windows 10 is Spyware