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Linux

Cloud Foundry Aims to Close Cloud Skills Gap

Filed under
Linux
Server

The Cloud Foundry Foundation on Wednesday announced the launch of a worldwide cloud-native developer certification initiative.

The foundation created the cloud developer certification program to fill the widening gap of trained programmers for cloud apps and services. The Linux Foundation -- which has trained and certified more developers on open source software than any organization in the world -- will provide the instruction.

More than a dozen leading technology, education and systems integration organizations around the world will participate in the cloud certification program. Companies involved in the initial training and certification rollout include Engineer Better, IBM, Pivotal, Resilient Scale, SAP, Stark and Wayne, and Swisscom.

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Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Koozali SME Server 8.2 Reaches End of Life on March 31, Upgrade to Koozali SME 9

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Koozali Foundation, through Terry Fage, announced the availability of a final set of updates for the Koozali SME Server 8.2 operating system, which will reach end of life this week.

Patching some of the reported bugs, the new packages released today for Koozali SME Server 8.2 are e-smith-ibays-2.2.0-16.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, e-smith-manager-2.2.0-14.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-clamav-2.2.0-15.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-locale-*-2.2.0-56.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, and smeserver-yum-2.2.0-26.el5.sme.noarch.rpm.

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Pale Moon A Lightweight, Firefox Based And Cross Platform Web Browser

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Linux

​Using browsers on a daily basis is nothing new for all us. We all have our favorite type of browsers like Chrome, Opera, Aurora and more. While as being open source mine and many Linux geek favorite browser is Mozilla Firefox. Today I will discuss one of awesome browser based on firefox named Pale Moon.

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Where Ubuntu 17.04 “Zesty Zapus” Is Heading

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Linux

You may have heard that our Ubuntu has got a new update. Yes, it is true. On 2017-03-23 20:12:37 the release notes on the website of Canonical Group Ltd were uploaded informing the latest Ubuntu 17.04 codenamed “Zesty Zapus”. Let's see where Ubuntu 17.04 is heading.

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6 Reasons Your Favorite Linux OS Is Plagued by Bugs

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • 6 Reasons Your Favorite Linux OS Is Plagued by Bugs

    I’ve been a long-time GNOME user, but for the past few months, I was in a loving relationship with Elementary OS. I found much to love in the minimalist Linux-based operating system, and I encouraged readers to give it a try.

    But that has changed. The number of bugs I encountered grew over time, and I’ve recently had enough. As a freelance writer, the only thing I need is a working laptop. If that’s not reliable, then I’m wasting time trying to fix the one tool my job requires.

  • Why do Linux distributions have software bugs?

    Linux is one of the best operating systems around, but no OS is perfect. All operating systems end up having bugs of one kind or another, including your favorite Linux distributions.

    A writer at MakeUseOf has listed six reasons why Linux distributions often have their share of bugs.

Linux and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

Orange Pi SBCs offer a choice of 32- or 64-bit SoCs for under $20

Filed under
Android
Linux

The open spec “Orange Pi Zero Plus 2” SBC provides WiFi, BT, HDMI, MIPI-CSI, and a choice of quad-core Allwinner H3 (Cortex-A7) or H5 (-A53) SoCs.

Shortly after launching an Orange Pi Zero Plus 2 with a 32-bit, Cortex-A7 Allwinner H3, Shenzhen Xunlong’s open source Orange Pi project shipped an Orange Pi Zero Plus 2 H5 model. The Linux- and Android-ready hacker board is identical except for the change to a similarly quad-core, but 64-bit, Cortex-A53 Allwinner H5 SoC. The open spec boards are shipping now on AliExpress, for $18.90 and $19.90, respectively, but have yet to appear on the Orange Pi website.

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Being a Linux user isn't weird anymore

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Linux

A few days ago, I was down at the Starbucks in my local bookstore—sipping on a hot chocolate, using the free (but rather pokey) Wi-Fi, and getting some work done.

This is pretty typical for me. Since I work from home, it’s nice to get out of the house and shake things up a little bit. Working for a few hours at a coffee shop tends to be just about right. I’m not the only person in the world who uses coffee shops as short term offices—it’s become so normal, it’s almost a cliché.

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Games and Emulation

Linux Devices

Koozali SME Server 8.2 Reaches End of Life on March 31, Upgrade to Koozali SME 9

Koozali Foundation, through Terry Fage, announced the availability of a final set of updates for the Koozali SME Server 8.2 operating system, which will reach end of life this week. Patching some of the reported bugs, the new packages released today for Koozali SME Server 8.2 are e-smith-ibays-2.2.0-16.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, e-smith-manager-2.2.0-14.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-clamav-2.2.0-15.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-locale-*-2.2.0-56.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, and smeserver-yum-2.2.0-26.el5.sme.noarch.rpm. Read more

Development News

  • GCC for New Contributors
    I’m a relative newcomer to GCC, so I thought it was worth documenting some of the hurdles I ran into when I started working on GCC, to try to make it easier for others to start hacking on GCC. Hence this guide.
  • #1: Easy Package Registration
    Last month, Brian Ripley announced on r-devel that registration of routines would now be tested for by R CMD check in r-devel (which by next month will become R 3.4.0). A NOTE will be issued now, this will presumably turn into a WARNING at some point. Writing R Extensions has an updated introduction) of the topic.
  • Emacs as C IDE and JHBuild
    Although Builder clearly is The Future as GNOME IDE, I still all my coding in Emacs, mostly because I have been using it for such a long time that my brain is to all the shortcuts and workflows. But Emacs can be a good IDE too. The most obvious everyday features that I want from an IDE are good source code navigation and active assistance while editing. In the first category are tasks like jumping to symbol's definition, find all callers of a function and such things. For editing, auto-completion, immediate warnings and error reporting, semantic-aware re-factoring are a must. Specifically for GNOME related development, I need all this to also work with JHBuild.