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Linux

Why Linux users should try Rust

Filed under
Development
Linux

Rust is a fairly young and modern programming language with a lot of features that make it incredibly flexible and very secure. It's also becoming quite popular, having won first place for the "most loved programming language" in the Stack Overflow Developer Survey three years in a row — 2016, 2017, and 2018.

Rust is also an open-source language with a suite of special features that allow it to be adapted to many different programming projects. It grew out of what was a personal project of a Mozilla employee back in 2006, was picked up as a special project by Mozilla a few years later (2009), and then announced for public use in 2010.

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Also: Perl for the Web: Mojolicious 8.0 Released

Redefining Security Technology in Zephyr and Fuchsia

Filed under
Linux
Security

If you’re the type of person who uses the word “vuln” as a shorthand for code vulnerabilities, you should check out the presentation from the recent Linux Security Summit called “Security in Zephyr and Fuchsia.” In the talk, two researchers from the National Security Agency discuss their contributions to the nascent security stacks of two open source OS projects: Zephyr and Fuchsia.

If you’re worried about the fact that Edward Snowden’s old employer is helping to write next generation OSes that could run our lives in 10 years, consider the upsides. First, since these are open source projects, any nefarious backdoors would be clearly visible. Second, the NSA knows a thing or two about security. Stephen Smalley and James Carter, who discussed security in Zephyr and Fuchsia, respectively, are computer security researchers at the NSA’s Information Assurance Research group, which developed and maintains the security-enhanced SELinux and SE Android distributions. Smalley leads the NSA's Security Enhancements (SE) for the Internet of Things project and is a kernel and userspace maintainer for SELinux.

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Also: Intel IWD Makes Another Step Closer To Version 1.0

Siemens Issues An Oktoberfest Release Of Jailhouse 0.10 Hypervisor

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Linux

The developers at Siemens AG working on the Jailhouse Linux hypervisor found it wise to issue their version 0.10 release prior to heading out to Oktoberfest.

"O'zapft is, so better release before going to the Wiesn: We are happy to announce a new version of the partitioning hypervisor Jailhouse," began their Jailhouse 0.10 release message -- for those not familiar with the wonderful Bavarian culture, Oktoberfest kicked off on Saturday with the annual "O'zapft is!" (tapping of the first keg) and the wiesn is where this best event of the world takes place each year. Sadly, no Phoronix Oktoberfest event this year, but the Siemens engineers decided to celebrate with their Jailhouse 0.10 release.

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My code of conduct

Filed under
Linux
Legal

There are many “code of conduct” documents. Often they differ a lot. I have my own and it is probably the shortest one:

Do not be an asshole. Respect the others.

Simple. I do not care which gender people have when I speak with them (ok, may stare at your boobs or butt once) nor their sexual preferences. Colour of the skin does not matter as most of my friends I first met online without knowing anything about them. Political stuff? As long as we can be friends and do not discuss it I am fine. Etc etc.

It works on conferences. And in projects where I am/was involved.

Someone may say that part of it was shaped by working for corporation (is Red Hat corpo?) due to all those no harassment regulations and trainings. I prefer to think that it is more of how I was raised by parents, family and society.

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Linux or Windows: 25 Things You Must Know While Choosing The Best Platform

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Choosing the best platform – Linux or Windows is complicated. Because both the system is versatile and capable of doing many mission-oriented and regular task. So if I ask you which one is the best system between Linux and Windows? On this topic, you can start an ever ending discussion. Windows OS is the most used operating system in the desktop world, no doubt in this statement, but “most used” can’t prove itself to be the best option in a bigger prospect.

We all know that cigarette is one of the “most used” consumer product in the world but still, it’s not good for health. It’s challenging to leave smoking because people are habituated with this addiction. So why I have given this example which is entirely off topic? Because we all know, humanity is a slave of habit, and accordingly, most of the users are quite habituated with the use of a Windows system for quite a long time. Now they can’t leave it just like smoking. If a bird remains in a case, how will it enjoy freedom? Even one day the bird will forget, he can fly.

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Zynq UltraScale+ module runs Linux at industrial temperatures

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Linux

iWave’s “iW-RainboW-G30M” compute module runs Linux on a quad -A53 Zynq UltraScale+ SoC with 192K to 504K FPGA logic cells. The module ships with 6GB DDR4 and 8GB eMMC and supports -40 to 85°C temperatures.

iWave has posted details on a computer-on-module built around Xilinx’s 64-bit, hybrid Arm/FPGA based Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC. Unlike the SODIMM-style iW-RainboW-G28M that iWave shipped earlier this year based on the dual Cortex-A9 Zynq-7000 FPGA SoC, the new iW-RainboW-G30M is a larger, 95 x 75mm module with dual 240-pin board-to-board interfaces. There’s an optional Zynq Ultrascale+ Development Kit, but no details were available.

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5 ways to play old-school games on a Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

They don't make 'em like they used to, do they? Video games, I mean.

Sure, there's a bit more grunt in the gear now. Princess Zelda used to be 16 pixels in each direction; there's now enough graphics power for every hair on her head. Today's processors could beat up 1988's processors in a cage-fight deathmatch without breaking a sweat.

But you know what's missing? The fun.

You've got a squillion and one buttons to learn just to get past the tutorial mission. There's probably a storyline, too. You shouldn't need a backstory to kill bad guys. All you need is jump and shoot. So, it's little wonder that one of the most enduring popular uses for a Raspberry Pi is to relive the 8- and 16-bit golden age of gaming in the '80s and early '90s. But where to start?

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The "Chinese EPYC" Hygon Dhyana CPU Support Still Getting Squared Away For Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Back in June is when the Linux kernel patches appeared for the Hygon Dhyana, the new x86 processors based on AMD Zen/EPYC technology licensed by Chengdu Haiguang IC Design Co for use in Chinese data-centers. While the patches have been out for months, they haven't reached the mainline kernel quite yet but that might change next cycle.

The Hygon Dyhana Linux kernel patches have gone through several revisions and the code is mostly adapting existing AMD Linux kernel code paths for Zen/EPYC to do the same on these new processors. While these initial Hygon CPUs appear to basically be re-branded EPYC CPUs, the identifiers are different as rather than AMD Family 17h, it's now Family 18h and the CPU Vendor ID is "HygonGenuine" and carries a new PCI Express device vendor ID, etc. So the different areas of the kernel from CPUFreq to KVM/Xen virtualization to Spectre V2 mitigations had to be updated for the correct behavior.

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Linux developers threaten to pull “kill switch”

Filed under
Development
Linux

Linux powers the internet, the Android in your pocket, and perhaps even some of your household appliances. A controversy over politics is now seeing some of its developers threatening to withdraw the license to all of their code, potentially destroying or making the whole Linux kernel unusable for a very long time.

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Linux 4.19-rc5

Filed under
Linux

As almost everyone knows, it's been an "interesting" week from a social
point-of-view. But from the technical side, -rc5 looks totally normal.

The diffstat is a bit higher than previous -rc5's, but the number of
trees pulled is lower, so overall, pretty much all is on track. I'm not
seeing any major "these bugs are not being fixed!" type of reports, so I
can hope that the initial churn that -rc1 threw at everyone is under
control.

The majority size-wise of changes here are with more tests being added
and fixed up, but there is also the usual networking, x86, sound, drm,
ppc, and other fixes. Full details are in the shortlog below.

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Also: Greg Kroah-Hartman Releases Linux 4.19-RC5 Following An "Interesting" Week

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Privacy, R.I.P., and Consent Management at Mozfest 2018

  • Firefox collects data on you through hidden add-ons

    Mozilla, the organisation that produces the Firefox browser and makes a loud noise about its open source credentials, is quietly collecting telemetry data on its users by the use of hidden add-ons, even though publicly visible telemetry controls are not selected.

  • R.I.P., Charles W. Moore, a fine man who liked fine Macs
    A farewell and au revoir to a great gentleman in making the most of your old Mac, Charles W. Moore, who passed away at his home in rural Canada on September 16 after a long illness. Mr Moore was an early fan of TenFourFox, even back in the old bad Firefox 4 beta days, and he really made his famous Pismo PowerBook G3 systems work hard for it.
  • Consent management at Mozfest 2018
    Good news. It looks like we're having a consent management mini-conference as part of Mozfest next month. (I'm one of the organizers for the Global Consent Manager session, and plan to attend the others.)

Android Leftovers

LibreOffice: A history of document freedom

My reminiscing led me to reach out to the Document Foundation, which governs LibreOffice, to learn more about the history of this open source productivity software. The Document Foundation's team told me that "StarWriter, the ancestor of the LibreOffice suite, was developed as proprietary software by Marco Börries, a German student, to write his high school final thesis." He formed a company called Star Division to develop the software. In 1999, Sun Microsystems bought Star Division for $73.5 million, changed the software's name to OpenOffice.org, and released the code as open source. Anyone could download the office suite at no charge for personal use. The Document Foundation told me, "For almost 10 years, the software was developed under Sun stewardship, from version 1.0 to version 3.2. It started with a dual license—LGPL and the proprietary SISSL (Sun Industry Standard Software License)—but it evolved to pure LGPL from version 2.0." Read more

Learn the 37 most frequently used shortcuts in GIMP

GIMP is a fantastic artist's tool for editing digital images, especially with the bevy of impressive features in the recent release of version 2.10. Of course, like all creative applications, you can get working more quickly if you can make yourself familiar with the various keyboard shortcuts and hotkeys available. GIMP, of course, gives you the ability to customize these shortcuts to match what you're personally comfortable with. However, the default shortcuts that GIMP ships with are impressive and generally easy to get used to. This cheat sheet is not an exhaustive list of all of the defaults GIMP has available. Instead, it covers the most frequently used shortcuts so you can get to work as fast as possible. Plus, there should be a few in here that make you aware of a few features that maybe you weren't aware of. Read more