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ps_mem Shows Per-Program Memory Usage On Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Unlike many other tools that report memory usage per process, ps_mem reports the RAM usage of programs. For example it shows how much RAM is used by all Chromium processes combined. The program developer notes that the ps_mem name is used for backwards compatibility, but a more accurate name would be coremem.

The displayed RAM is calculated by adding the sum of private RAM and the sum of shared RAM for a program processes.

Running ps_mem with no arguments shows a list programs and their RAM usage in ascendant order (from the lowest RAM usage to the highest). For each program it shows the private, shared, and total used RAM, as well as the number of processes. Swap information for each program can be shown as well, by using the -S option (sudo ps_mem -S).

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Strawberry Released for Sparky Linux, feren OS 2019.04 in Review

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux Mint KDE Still Possible

Filed under
Linux

If you're the Linux Mint and KDE lover, then you know that starting from Linux Mint 19 "Tara", your beloved Linux distro has stopped shipping with KDE. So Linux Mint KDE has died a brutal death. But we can revive the combination of the two best software, i.e. Linux Mint on KDE.

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The Great GNU/Linux Division

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I have not abandoned the language of the purists altogether. For instance, I still refer to my distribution of choice as ?Debian GNU/Linux,? because that is what project members prefer. Similarly, if an FSF employee asks that I use their preferred term, I will usually agree if I think the story I?m covering is one in which people should know the difference.

What has changed is my refusal to be overly-concerned about such matters of language. While language issues were worth discussing 20 years ago, the inability to move beyond them is obsessive and crankish today. If the purists really want to help free software, they would be more useful contributing to the project of their choice than clinging a cause that was lost years ago.

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Dropped Linux Kernel Drivers Occasionally See Revival - FDOMAIN Gets Second Chance

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Linux

When drivers get dropped from the Linux kernel it's generally due to hardware being no one cares about anymore that hasn't been produced in many years and the code often falls into disrepair to the point that the only logical way forward is dropping the driver. That happened last year to the "FDOMAIN" driver but as does happen every so often (albeit rare) thanks to the code being still obtainable through Git and the nature of open-source, interested parties can step up and revive the code.

The FDOMAIN Linux driver is for Future Domain 16-bit SCSI host adapters found in a variety of PCI boards. The code was removed in March of 2018 as the Future Domain drivers hadn't seen any bug fixing in years and were relying upon SCSI infrastructure deprecated some fifteen years earlier. The supported PCI SCSI adapters haven't even been produced in many years albeit can still be found from some after-market shops / eBay like the Adaptec AHA-2920A card that allows up to seven SCSI peripherals over PCI.

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The end of Scientific Linux

Filed under
Linux

Scientific Linux is driven by Fermilab's scientific mission and focused
on the changing needs of experimental facilities.

Fermilab is looking ahead to DUNE[1] and other future international
collaborations. One part of this is unifying our computing platform with
collaborating labs and institutions.

Toward that end, we will deploy CentOS 8 in our scientific computing
environments rather than develop Scientific Linux 8. We will
collaborate with CERN and other labs to help make CentOS an even better
platform for high-energy physics computing.

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Linux on Dex comes to Galaxy S9, Galaxy S10 and the Galaxy Tab S5e

Filed under
Linux

Linux on DeX is aimed to bring the seamless mobility of Samsung’s DeX platform for developers to code on the go. The app enables developers to work on both Android and Ubuntu-based Linux distributions anytime, anywhere. Other Linux distributions may also work, although Samsung isn’t offering official support for those yet. Also, Samsung is partnering with Canonical, the maker of the Ubuntu Linux distribution, to provide Linux on DeX users with a modified version of Ubuntu.

As of now, Linux on DeX is only compatible with the Galaxy Note 9 and the Galaxy Tab S4. However, with the new update, users of Samsung’s Galaxy S flagships from 2018 as well as 2019 get it too. The recently launched Galaxy Tab S5e also now supports Linux on DeX. The new version, which is currently in beta, also fixes the issue with Ubuntu image download on Google Chrome.

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The Linux desktop is not in trouble

Filed under
Linux

Writing for ZDNet earlier this month, Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols declared trouble for the Linux desktop. He’s wrong.

Or maybe not. Maybe we’re just looking at different parts of the elephant. sjvn’s core argument, if I may sum it up, is that fragmentation is holding back the Linux desktop. Linux can’t gain significant traction in the desktop market because there are just so many options. This appeals to computer nerds, but leads to confusion for general users who don’t want to care about whether they’re running GNOME or KDE Plasma or whatever.

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Thunderbolt Is Seeing A Lot Of Improvements For Linux 5.2

Filed under
Linux

Adding to the excitement of the Linux 5.2 kernel changes are a lot of Thunderbolt improvements expected to be introduced in this next kernel cycle.

Mika Westerberg of Intel has been working on a lot of Thunderbolt connectivity improvements destined for Linux 5.2 and in recent days has begun staging this work in the thunderbolt-next tree ahead of the Linux 5.2 kernel merge window opening in May.

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Video/Audio: Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition, Open Source Security Podcast, This Week in Linux, Linux Gaming News Punch, Linux Action News, GNU World Order and Talk Python to Me

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • What’s New in Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Desktop Edition

    Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition is official Manjaro Linux flavour with Deepin Desktop Environment 15.8 as default desktop environment includes several deepin applications a free open source software.

    Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition is powered by the latest Long-Term Support of Linux Kernel 4.19, include pamac version 7.3. in manjaro 18.0, The Manjaro Settings Manager (MSM) now provides an easy-to-use graphical interface for installing and removing the many series of kernels. At the time of this release, eight kernel-series are available directly from manjaro binary repositories, from 3.16 series to the latest 4.19 release.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 142 - Hypothetical security: what if you find a USB flash drive?

    Josh and Kurt talk about what one could do if you find a USB drive. The context is based on the story where the Secret Service was rumored to have plugged a malicious USB drive into a computer. The purpose of discussion is to explore how to handle a situation like this in the real world. We end the episode with a fantastic comparison of swim safety and security.

  • Episode 64 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got a lot of releases week. Ubuntu and all of the Flavours have released 19.04 versions along with an interesting update from the Ubuntu derivative Pop!_OS. The KDE Community announced the availability of a bunch of new versions of various KDE Applications.

  • Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 9

    Coming in hot (please save me from this heat) is the ninth episode of the Linux Gaming News Punch, your weekly round-up of some interesting bits of news.

    For regular readers, as always this might not be too helpful but for those who don't visit too often this should help keep you updated.

  • Linux Action News 102

    Ubuntu 19.04 is released we share our take, OpenSSH has an important release, and Mozilla brings Python to the browser.

    Also WebThings is launched and we think it might have a shot.

  • GNU World Order 13x17
  • Talk Python to Me: #208 Packaging, Making the most of PyCon, and more

    Are you going to PyCon (or a similar conference)? Join me and Kenneth Retiz as we discuss how to make the most of PyCon and what makes it special for each of us.

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More in Tux Machines

ps_mem Shows Per-Program Memory Usage On Linux

Unlike many other tools that report memory usage per process, ps_mem reports the RAM usage of programs. For example it shows how much RAM is used by all Chromium processes combined. The program developer notes that the ps_mem name is used for backwards compatibility, but a more accurate name would be coremem. The displayed RAM is calculated by adding the sum of private RAM and the sum of shared RAM for a program processes. Running ps_mem with no arguments shows a list programs and their RAM usage in ascendant order (from the lowest RAM usage to the highest). For each program it shows the private, shared, and total used RAM, as well as the number of processes. Swap information for each program can be shown as well, by using the -S option (sudo ps_mem -S). Read more

Today in Techrights

Strawberry Released for Sparky Linux, feren OS 2019.04 in Review

OSS Leftovers

  • The State of Neural Machine Translation for Asian Languages
    Open source for Asian language NLP is getting more and more active, but it would be useful to have more projects that are both frequently updated and popular. Sometimes, code licensing plays a negative role, because many old projects are GPL (General Public License). Jieba, Rakuten MA, KoNLPy are some frequently-used libraries for CJK (Chinese-Japanese-Korean) NLP. (Lucy Park is a KoNLPy developer.)
  • Will your organization change itself to death?
    Organizations, open or otherwise, cannot spend every moment changing themselves. For one thing, doing so would mean abandoning whatever mission they purport to have. As the saying goes, "if you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything." That adage, while most common in the context of political beliefs, is applicable here too.
  • Open source may be the future, but very few are writing it

    Open source may dominate the software we use to power the cloud, AI, and more, but a small percentage of developers do most of the coding. While it has long been true that for any given open source project, the vast majority of core contributions come from a cabal of committed developers, it seemed like the popularity of using open source would bleed into writing open source. Nope.

  • viewport and iphone reflow

    Something that’s annoyed me for some years is that all the web sites I build don’t work quite right with my iphone. Scroll down a page, visit a link, go back, and safari jumps back to the top of the page. Very annoying. Pretty much no other site I visit seems to have this problem, yet I couldn’t figure out what I was doing wrong since I’m barely doing anything at all. There are some support forum complaints about similar bugs, but mostly from several years ago, and mostly “solved: it works now” without explanation.

    Finally, figured out what seems to be the problem. The iphone introduces its own viewport meta tag, to define the screen dimensions, and control whether the user can zoom or not. A lot of sites abuse this to the point of unusability, so I very determinedly stayed clear. But without a viewport tag, safari is really dumb.

  • Categorizing OpenBSD Bugs

    I thought it would be interesting to see if something similar were true of OpenBSD bugs. I went through two years of OpenBSD errata for the most recent four releases (6.1, 6.2, 6.3 and 6.4) and categorized each bug.

  • Bug in French government’s WhatsApp replacement let anyone join Élysée chats

    Tchap is not intended to be a classified communications system—it runs on regular Android phones and uses the public Internet. But as the DINSIC, the French inter-ministry directorate for information systems that runs Tchap put it, Tchap "is an instant messenger allowing government employees to exchange real-time information on everyday professional issues, ensuring that the conversations remain hosted on the national territory." In other words, it's to keep official government business off of Facebook's and Telegram's servers outside France.

    Based on the Riot.im chat application from the open source project Matrix, Tchap is officially still in "beta," according to DINSIC. And that beta test is getting off to a rough start. Within two days, French security researcher Baptiste Robert—who goes by the Twitter handle @fs0c131y (aka Elliot Alderson)—had tapped into Tchap and subsequently viewed all of the internal "public" discussion channels hosted by the service.

  • Reset Email Account Passwords After a Website Malware Infection