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Linux

Galaxy Watch will run Tizen 4.0

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

In May, Samsung trademarked the “Galaxy Watch” and “Galaxy Fit” monikers at the USPTO, suggesting its plan to bring its wearables under the Galaxy branding. Now two months later, SamMobile confirms that Samsung’s next smartwatch, the successor to the Gear S3, will indeed be called the Galaxy Watch, and not Gear S4. Furthermore, they add that the upcoming Galaxy Watch will run Tizen 4.0 out of the box.

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Linux Security

Filed under
Linux
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • PTI Support To Address Meltdown Nearing The Finish Line For x86 32-bit Linux

    While Page Table Isolation (PTI/KPTI) has been available since the Meltdown CPU vulnerability was disclosed at the start of the year, that's been for x86_64 Linux while the x86 32-bit support has remained a work-in-progress and only relatively recently has come together.

    Joerg Roedel sent out the eighth version of the x86-32 PTI patches today, which address feedback following a good round of review. This latest page table isolation work for x86 32-bit address more developer feedback and tidies up some of the code.

  • Linux To Better Protect Entropy Sent In From User-Space

    Fedora has begun utilizing a user-space jitter entropy daemon for feeding entropy to the kernel at boot time in case not enough is available for the kernel's random needs. But with that approach not being from a true hardware random number generator, a patch worked out by veteran Linux kernel developer Ted Ts'o will mix in RdRand entropy.

    Fedora has resorted to a user-space jitter entropy daemon to workaround slow boot times on a sub-set of systems/VMs when using recent kernels. A change was made to the kernel earlier this year for addressing CVE-2018-1108, which is about a weakness in the kernel's random seed data whereby early processes in the boot sequence could not have random enough data. But the fix dramatically slows down systems booting by waiting until sufficient entropy is available. This is problematic particularly for VMs where virtio-rng is not present. For some users, they can't get the system(s) booted on affected kernels unless tapping on keyboard keys enough times for generating sufficient entropy.

  • Linux 4.17.8

    I'm announcing the release of the 4.17.8 kernel.

    This is to fix the i386 issue that was in the 4.17.7 release.  All should be fine now.

  • SPECTRE Variant 1 scanning tool
  • When your software is used way after you EOL it.

    One of my first jobs was working on a satellite project called ALEXIS at Los Alamos National Laboratory and had been part of a Congressional plan to explore making space missions faster and cheaper. This meant the project was a mix-mash of whatever computer systems were available at the time. Satellite tracking was planned on I think a Macintosh SE, the main uploads and capture were a combination of off the shelf hardware and a Sparc 10. Other analysis was done on spare Digital and SGI Irix systems. It was here I really learned a lot about system administration as each of those systems had their own 'quirks' and ways of doing things.

    I worked on this for about a year as a Graduate Research Assistant, and learned a lot about how many projects in science and industrial controls get 'frozen' in place way longer than anyone writing the software expects. This is because at a certain point the device becomes cheaper to keep running than replace or even updating. So when I was watching this USGS video this morning,

Raspberry Pi On Linux 4.19 Will Be Able To Report Under-Voltage Issues

Filed under
Linux
Software

The Linux 4.19 kernel will be introducing a new "raspberrypi-hwmon" driver capable of reporting under-voltage conditions for Raspberry Pi boards.

This Raspberry Pi Hwmon driver makes it easy to find out if your ARM SBC is suffering from any under-voltage condition: the driver reports the under-voltage sensor state via a mailbox interface with the VC4 firmware. Undervoltage conditions are then written to the kernel log.

Read more

Greg Kroah-Hartman on Linux, Security, and Making Connections at Open Source Summit

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

People might not think about the Linux kernel all that much when talking about containers, serverless, and other hot technologies, but none of them would be possible without Linux as a solid base to build on, says Greg Kroah-Hartman. He should know. Kroah-Hartman maintains the stable branch of the Linux kernel along with several subsystems. He is also co-author of the Linux Kernel Development Report, a Fellow at The Linux Foundation, and he serves on the program committee for Open Source Summit.

In this article, we talk with Kroah-Hartman about his long involvement with Linux, the importance of community interaction, and the upcoming Open Source Summit.

Read more

New Facilities for System76

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • System76 Linux computer maker offers a sneak peek into its new manufacturing facility

    System76 has long been a Linux computer seller, but recently, it has transitioned into a Linux computer maker. What's the difference, you ask? Well, currently, the company doesn't really make its own computers. System76's laptops, for instance, are made by other manufacturers, which it re-brands as its own.

    No, System76 doesn't just slap its name on other company's laptops and ship them out the door. Actually, it works closely with the manufacturers, tweaks firmware, and verifies that both Ubuntu and its Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS will work well on the hardware. System76 then offers top-notch support too. In other words, the company isn't just selling a computer, but an experience too.

  • System76 New Manufacturing Facility
  • System76 Moves Ahead With Preparing To Manufacture Their Own Desktop Linux PCs

    Back in April 2017 was the announcement that System76 would begin designing and manufacturing their own systems beginning with desktops and to be followed at a later date by their own laptops, rather than relying upon whitebox designs that they currently retail with their Ubuntu/Pop!_OS-loaded PCs. The Colorado-based company is inching closer to fully realizing their goal.

    For a while now the System76 folks have been posting various pictures of their in-progress manufacturing facility while today they have shared more images on their blog.

Linux Development, Graphics and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Fedora Gets An Unofficial Kernel Based On Clear Linux

    While the kernel configuration is just one part of Intel's Clear Linux optimizations for their performance-oriented distribution, a Fedora user has taken the liberty of spinning a Fedora kernel build based upon Clear Linux's kernel configuration.

  • An Idle Injection Framework Queued For Linux 4.19

    Another one of the new frameworks slated for the Linux 4.19 kernel cycle kicking off in August is for idle injection.

    Right now drivers like Intel PowerClamp and the AMD CPU cooling code insert idle CPU cycles when needed on their own, in order to keep below an intended power envelope or thermal threshold. Rather than drivers implementing idle injections on their own, the idle injection code within the Linux kernel has moved into a dedicated framework to make it easier for other kernel users to deploy.

  • IT87 Linux Driver For Supporting Many Motherboard Sensors Is Facing Death

    While Linux hardware support for desktop PCs has advanced a great deal over the years, one area that continues to struggle is support for fan/thermal/power sensors on many of today's motherboards. This area has struggled with not enough public documentation / data-sheets from ASIC vendors as well as not enough upstream Linux kernel developers being interested in the hwmon subsystem. The IT87 Linux driver for many common Super I/O chips found on countless motherboards is unfortunately facing a downfall.

  • Mesa 18.2 Gets Extra Two Weeks Of Development Time

    Serving as the Mesa 18.2 release manager is Andres Gomez of Igalia. He's now pushed back the release plan by two weeks, although Mesa 18.2.0 still should end up shipping in August.

    Rather than branching Mesa 18.2 by week's end, which begins the release candidate phase and marks the feature freeze, that deadline will be pushed back to 1 August. That means there are an extra two weeks of developers to land any desired changes into this next quarterly Mesa feature update.

  • Tips for Success with Open Source Certification

    In today’s technology arena, open source is pervasive. The 2018 Open Source Jobs Report found that hiring open source talent is a priority for 83 percent of hiring managers, and half are looking for candidates holding certifications. And yet, 87 percent of hiring managers also cite difficulty in finding the right open source skills and expertise. This article is the second in a weekly series on the growing importance of open source certification.

    In the first article, we focused on why certification matters now more than ever. Here, we’ll focus on the kinds of certifications that are making a difference, and what is involved in completing necessary training and passing the performance-based exams that lead to certification, with tips from Clyde Seepersad, General Manager of Training and Certification at The Linux Foundation.

  • Xen Project Hypervisor Power Management: Suspend-to-RAM on Arm Architectures

    About a year ago, we started a project to lay the foundation for full-scale power management for applications involving the Xen Project Hypervisor on Arm architectures. We intend to make Xen on Arm's power management the open source reference design for other Arm hypervisors in need of power management capabilities.

IIoT platform extends from the cloud to the depths of a mine

Filed under
Linux

Advantech announced an IoT platform initially targeting mine safety that combines BTI’s “MIOTY” LPWAN sensor solution running on an Ubuntu-powered Advantech ARK-2250L gateway connected to a Hitachi IoT Service Hub running on Microsoft Azure.

Because Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) projects tend to be complex, multi-product endeavors, Advantech has lately been entering into IoT collaborations, such as its Embedded Linux & Android Alliance (ELAA) consortium and recently announced Solution Ready Packages (SRPs) cocreation program. Today at the Microsoft Inspire conference in Las Vegas, the company announced a new collaboration with Behr Technologies, Inc. (BTI), Hitachi Solutions America, and Microsoft on an end-to-end IIoT platform that will initially target the mining industry.

Read more

Stable kernels 4.17.7, 4.14.56, 4.9.113 and 4.4.141

Filed under
Linux

Open-spec NAS SBC with 4x SATA 3.0 ports relaunches

Filed under
Linux

Kobol has relaunched its open-spec “Helios4” NAS SBC and fanned system. The Helios4 runs Debian on a Marvell Armada 388 SoC with 2GB ECC RAM and offers 1x GbE, 2x USB 3.0, and 4x SATA 3.0 ports for up to 48TB.

In May 2017, Singapore-based startup Kobol attempted to launch its open-spec Helios4 SBC and fan-equipped system for network attached storage (NAS) on Kickstarter. A total of 337 backers ponied up $74K for the Helios4, which also supports media streaming and file sharing. Kobol fell short of its $110K funding goal, but it fulfilled the last of its KS orders in January. The company is now running its own funding campaign to manufacture a second 500-unit batch.

Read more

Kernel and Graphics: PDS, VKMS and Nouveau

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • PDS 0.98s release

    PDS 0.98s is released with the following changes

    1. Fix compilation issue on raspberry pi.
    2. Minor rework and optimization on balance code path.
    3. Fix wrong nr_max_tries in migrate_pending_tasks.

    This is mainly a bug fix and minor optimization release for 4.17. The rework of balance code doesn't go well, it actually make more overhead than current implement. Another rework which based on current implement is still on going, hopefully be included in next release.

  • PDS-MQ CPU Scheduler Revised For The Linux 4.17 Kernel With Minor Optimizations

    Alfred Chen announced this week the release of PDS-mq 0.98s, his latest patch-set of this CPU scheduler against the Linux 4.17 upstream code-base and includes minor optimization work and bug fixes.

    The PDS scheduler stands for the "Priority and Deadline based Skiplist multiple queue scheduler" that is derived from Con Kolivas' former BFS scheduler with Variable Run Queue (VRQ) support. PDS design principles are to be a simple CPU process scheduler yet efficient and scalable. PDS-mq differs from Con Kolivas' current MuQSS scheduler.

  • Add infrastructure for Vblank and page flip events in vkms simulated by hrtimer

    Since the beginning of May 2018, I have been diving into the DRM subsystem. In the beginning, nothing made sense to me, and I had to fight hard to understand how things work. Fortunately, I was not alone, and I had great support from Gustavo Padovan, Daniel Vetter, Haneen Mohammed, and the entire community. Recently, I finally delivered a new feature for VKMS: the infrastructure for Vblank and page flip events.

    At this moment, VKMS have regular Vblank events simulated through hrtimers (see drm-misc-next), which is a feature required by VKMS to mimic real hardware [6]. The development approach was entirely driven by the tests provided by IGT, more specifically the kms_flip. I modified IGT to read a module name via command line and force the use of it, instead of using only the modules defined in the code (patch submitted to IGT, see [1]). With this modification in the IGT, my development process to add a Vblank infrastructure to VKMS had three main steps as Figure 1 describes.

  • The State Of The VKMS Driver, Preparations For vBlank & Page Flip Events

    One of the exciting additions to look forward to with the upcoming Linux 4.19 kernel cycle is the virtual "VKMS" kernel mode-setting driver. The driver is still a work-in-progress, but multiple developers are working on it.

  • NIR Continues To Be Prepped For OpenCL Support

    Longtime Nouveau contributor Karol Herbst who joined Red Hat several months ago has been working on Nouveau NIR support as stepping towards SPIR-V/compute support and this summer the work very much remains an active target.

  • Nouveau Gallium3D Moves Closer Towards OpenGL 4.5 Compliance

    While the RadeonSI and Intel i965 Mesa drivers have been at OpenGL 4.5 compliance for a while now, the Nouveau "NVC0" Gallium3D driver has been bound to OpenGL 4.3 officially.

    This Nouveau Gallium3D driver for NVIDIA "Fermi" graphics hardware and newer has effectively supported all of the OpenGL 4.4/4.5 extensions, but not officially. Originally the NVC0 problem for OpenGL 4.4 and newer was the requirement of passing the OpenGL Conformance Test Suite (CTS), which at first wasn't open-source. But now The Khronos Group has made it available to everyone as open-source. Additionally, the proper legal wrangling is in place so the Nouveau driver could become a conforming Khronos adopter under the X.Org Foundation without any associated costs/fees with Nouveau being purely open-source and primarily considered a community driver.

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More in Tux Machines

Krita 4.1.1 Released

When it is updated, you can also use the Krita Lime PPA to install Krita 4.1.1 on Ubuntu and derivatives. We are working on an updated snap. Read more

Qt Creator 4.7.0

  • Qt Creator 4.7.0 released
    We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.7.0!
  • Qt Creator 4.7 Released With Clang Code Model Turned On By Default
    The Qt Company has officially released Qt Creator 4.7 as the newest feature release to this open-source, cross-platform Qt/C++ focused integrated development environment. Today's Qt Creator 4.7 IDE release is quite significant in that it finally turns on the Clang code model by default. The Clang code model provides significantly better C++ support over what was offered by their in-house code model and will stay better up-to-date with newer C/C++ standards, etc. The Clang code model in Qt Creator 4.7 is based on LLVM/Clang 6.0.

Linux Security

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • PTI Support To Address Meltdown Nearing The Finish Line For x86 32-bit Linux
    While Page Table Isolation (PTI/KPTI) has been available since the Meltdown CPU vulnerability was disclosed at the start of the year, that's been for x86_64 Linux while the x86 32-bit support has remained a work-in-progress and only relatively recently has come together. Joerg Roedel sent out the eighth version of the x86-32 PTI patches today, which address feedback following a good round of review. This latest page table isolation work for x86 32-bit address more developer feedback and tidies up some of the code.
  • Linux To Better Protect Entropy Sent In From User-Space
    Fedora has begun utilizing a user-space jitter entropy daemon for feeding entropy to the kernel at boot time in case not enough is available for the kernel's random needs. But with that approach not being from a true hardware random number generator, a patch worked out by veteran Linux kernel developer Ted Ts'o will mix in RdRand entropy. Fedora has resorted to a user-space jitter entropy daemon to workaround slow boot times on a sub-set of systems/VMs when using recent kernels. A change was made to the kernel earlier this year for addressing CVE-2018-1108, which is about a weakness in the kernel's random seed data whereby early processes in the boot sequence could not have random enough data. But the fix dramatically slows down systems booting by waiting until sufficient entropy is available. This is problematic particularly for VMs where virtio-rng is not present. For some users, they can't get the system(s) booted on affected kernels unless tapping on keyboard keys enough times for generating sufficient entropy.
  • Linux 4.17.8
    I'm announcing the release of the 4.17.8 kernel. This is to fix the i386 issue that was in the 4.17.7 release.  All should be fine now.
  • SPECTRE Variant 1 scanning tool
  • When your software is used way after you EOL it.
    One of my first jobs was working on a satellite project called ALEXIS at Los Alamos National Laboratory and had been part of a Congressional plan to explore making space missions faster and cheaper. This meant the project was a mix-mash of whatever computer systems were available at the time. Satellite tracking was planned on I think a Macintosh SE, the main uploads and capture were a combination of off the shelf hardware and a Sparc 10. Other analysis was done on spare Digital and SGI Irix systems. It was here I really learned a lot about system administration as each of those systems had their own 'quirks' and ways of doing things. I worked on this for about a year as a Graduate Research Assistant, and learned a lot about how many projects in science and industrial controls get 'frozen' in place way longer than anyone writing the software expects. This is because at a certain point the device becomes cheaper to keep running than replace or even updating. So when I was watching this USGS video this morning,

Raspberry Pi On Linux 4.19 Will Be Able To Report Under-Voltage Issues

The Linux 4.19 kernel will be introducing a new "raspberrypi-hwmon" driver capable of reporting under-voltage conditions for Raspberry Pi boards. This Raspberry Pi Hwmon driver makes it easy to find out if your ARM SBC is suffering from any under-voltage condition: the driver reports the under-voltage sensor state via a mailbox interface with the VC4 firmware. Undervoltage conditions are then written to the kernel log. Read more