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Linux

Migration to open source tool inspires new Linux distribution

Filed under
GNU
Linux

In 2005, in version 5.0, The Pharmacy Server was mature and solid, running on a central server that supported over 300 drugstore chains in Brazil, and has been featured by Red Hat as a certification success story.

In 2010, after mergers and acquisitions, the company's operation was terminated and Pharmacy Server was shut down. Its last version used Red Hat 5.4, Firebird 1.5.3, and a custom version of Webmin web admin interface.

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IFC6410 Pico-ITX Development Board Now Supports Fedora And Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
Ubuntu

Makers, hobbyists and developers looking for a new Linux Fedora or Ubuntu development board for their projects might be interested to learn that the IFC6410 Pico-ITX board which is available to purchase for around $149.

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Rescatux 0.32 Beta 1 OS Can Help Users Fix Windows Systems and Linux Distributions

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Rescatux can fix GRUB and GRUB2, check and fix filesystems (Windows MBR included), change GNU/Linux passwords, regenerate sudoers files, and much more.

Having a set of tools that can help you save your system from various problems is great, especially when those tools are packaged in a nice Debian-based Live distro. It may not look like much, but the point of this OS is not to look good, but to do a very specific job.

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Control Your Phone with These Open Source Linux Apps

Filed under
Linux
OSS

If your phone can be connected to your computer with an USB cable you can do a lot more through this connection than just recharging it or transferring files to and from your phone's storage. For example, you can make phone calls, read and send text messages, and see a bunch of other information from your phone, right on your PC. There is a number of Free Open Source software applications that allow you to do this, and you don't even need to have a smartphone for this to work, just a phone that can connect to USB.

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World’s most secure Android phone finally starts shipping next month

Filed under
Android
Linux
Security
  • World’s most secure Android phone finally starts shipping next month

    Secure communications specialist Silent Circle recently set out to build the most secure Android phone in the world, and some have gone as far as to call the company’s Blackphone an “NSA-proof” smartphone. That statement can’t be confirmed, of course, since the NSA surely still has a few tricks up its sleeve that we don’t know about. What we can say, however, is that people concerned with keeping their mobile communications private will soon have a new option that is more secure than any publicly available Android phone currently on the market.

  • Silent Circle's Blackphone will ship out in three weeks

    Silent Circle in partnership with Geeksphone announced the Blackphone in January this year. The makers of the Blackphone claims that the handset is the world's first smartphone that gives its user total control of privacy.

    The upcoming smartphone is powered by a modified version of Android, PrivatOS, which is believed to be more security-oriented. The Blackphone will be carrier and vendor independent, which will ensure that individuals and businesses are able to make and receive secure phone calls, send texts, store files, browse the internet and more without compromising the privacy of the user.

  • Blackphone is about to sidle stealthily into the mainstream
  • NSA-Proof? Super-Secure Blackphone Shipping by July
  • Super-Secure Blackphone Shipping by July
  • Anti-forensic mobile OS gets your phone to lie for you

    In Android Anti-forensics: Modifying CyanogenMod Karl-Johan Karlsson and William Bradley Glisson present a version of the Cyanogenmod alternate operating system for Android devices, modified so that it generates plausible false data to foil forensic analysis by law enforcement. The idea is to create a mobile phone that "lies" for you so that adversaries who coerce you into letting them take a copy of its data can't find out where you've been, who you've been talking to, or what you've been talking about.

Initial thoughts on Linux Mint 17

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Initial thoughts on Linux Mint 17

    As night follows the day, so too do Linux Mint launches follow Ubuntu releases. Linux Mint is a project which puts together a desktop-oriented distribution based on Ubuntu packages. The Linux Mint project tends to take a more practical and conservative approach to crafting a desktop operating system when compared to Ubuntu. While Ubuntu experiments with the Unity desktop, servers, cloud computing and mobile devices, the Mint team stays focused on producing a familiar, user-friendly, multimedia-enabled desktop solution. Starting with their most recent release, Linux Mint 17, the Mint team has announced they will be adjusting their release cycle, basing all Linux Mint releases on the most recent Ubuntu long term support release. This should make for a more stable platform and a more relaxed release cycle.

  • Download Linux Mint 17 Xfce and KDE release candidates

    In today's open source roundup: Linux Mint 17 Xfce and KDE RC released. Plus: Deepin 2014 RC released, and a review of Linux Mint 17 MATE by DistroWatch

Linux professionals use tweak tools to customize their OS, and so can you

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Where Windows has utilities, Linux has tweak tools. And whether you're a Linux pro or a recent refugee from Windows XP, they can help you makeA Ubuntu 14.04 LTS "Trusty Tahr" (the latest and greatest offering from Linux distro pioneer Canonical) really start to feel like home.

Customizability has long been one of Linux's most compelling features--particularly when compared with proprietary alternatives such as Windows and OS X--but the tweak tools out there today let you refine the OS even further. And if you're making the migration to Linux on your workplace PCs, tweak tools can help ease the transition.

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Alienware say Steam Machine will increase Linux gamers by “20, 30 fold. Overnight”

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Linux gaming has seen massive growth in the past two years, ever since Valve began openly supporting the open source operating system. That growth is nothing compared to what it will be after the launch of their Steam Machines, says Alienware’s product manager, Marc Diana.

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Seven Out of Ten Most Played Games on Steam Have Linux Support

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Valve is looking very seriously at Linux as a genuine replacement for Windows and the company has put a lot of effort into it. An interesting way of seeing just how much they care is to check the top ten most played games on Steam.

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UAS: USB Attached SCSI now available in the 3.15 kernel, qemu USB-3.0 compatibility coming up

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

At the end of 2013 I've spend 2 full months working on getting XHCI streams support and the UAS driver in the Linux kernel, which uses streams into shape. With the release of the 3.15 kernel this work now is available for end users to use.

This is good news for anyone who cares about performance of USB connected harddisks / ssds. The old usb mass-storage protocol is well known for its poor performance. UAS however allows NCQ and thus allows effectively using the full USB-3 bandwidth. If you've an UAS capable harddisk enclosure then all you need is a 3.15 kernel build with the UAS driver enabled and you should instantly get better performance. Note that most harddisk enclosures, including USB-3 enclosures do not support UAS, so if you want to use UAS double check before buying a harddisk enclosure.

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Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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