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Portable wireless speakers run Linux on a Raspberry Pi

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Linux

Axiom’s portable wireless 150W speakers stream music from the web, mobile devices, or USB, and include a WiFi access point and a 9- or 18-hour battery pack.

Speaker and home theater manufacturer Axiom has found Kickstarter success with its AxiomAir wireless speaker system, which has surpassed its $75,000 goal to reach $121,000, with 25 days to go before the July 12 deadline. Two dozen $475 packages were still available at publication time. Other packages go for $497, said to be more than $300 under the retail price, or $950 for a two-pack, among other discounted combo packs.

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Canonical Patches Linux Kernel Vulnerability in All Supported Ubuntu OSes

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Linux
Ubuntu

Canonical has published earlier a new security notice for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux operating systems, informing users that a Linux kernel vulnerability has been patched, urging them to update their systems as soon as possible.

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The Creator of Linux on the Future Without Him

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Linux
Interviews

The conversation, combined with Linus Torvalds’s aggression behind the wheel, makes this sunny afternoon drive suddenly feel all too serious. Torvalds—the grand ruler of all geeks—does not drive like a geek. He plasters his foot to the pedal of a yellow Mercedes convertible with its “DAD OF 3” license plate as we rip around a corner on a Portland, Ore., freeway. My body smears across the passenger door. “There is no concrete plan of action if I die,” Torvalds yells to me over the wind and the traffic. “But that would have been a bigger deal 10 or 15 years ago. People would have panicked. Now I think they’d work everything out in a couple of months.”

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Why I dislike systemd

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Linux
BSD

As a Linux sysadmin in the 2010s, it's hard not to have an opinion on systemd. But what I find baffling about it is how divisive it is; nearly everyone (or at least the most vocal crowd) seems to either love it or hate it. When I tell people that systemd was the catalyst for my defection to OpenBSD last year, their usual reaction is to assume that I am part of the "hate it" group. Nope.

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Imagination Appears To Be Working On An Open-Source PowerVR Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
OSS

The latest talk is that Imagination Technologies may be developing an open-source Linux graphics driver for their PowerVR hardware.

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Also in Phoronix:

  • Khronos Is Working On An OpenGL Transmission Format

    Work on the new OpenGL Transmission Format was mentioned in the EETimes. The report should be accurate given that it comes from the Khronos President, Neil Trevett. Additionally, I found out about this report as it came along this morning from the official Khronos.org news feed.

  • Catalyst 15.5 For Linux Brings Some Performance Improvements

    Earlier this month Catalyst 15.5 was released for Linux as the first official Linux graphics driver update since last December when Catalyst 14.12 was released (sans the special fglrx driver packaged by Canonical for Ubuntu 15.04). As discussed by users in our forums and elsewhere, Catalyst 15.5 does offer better performance for certain OpenGL workloads compared to the earlier driver, but the gains aren't universal.

  • NVIDIA 352.21 Linux Driver Adds New GPU Support, Fixes

    NVIDIA released the 352.21 Linux driver today as the latest release in their 352.xx driver series.

  • Mesa 10.6.0 Officially Released While Still Lacking OpenGL 4.0+ Compliance

    While it's coming a bit behind schedule, Mesa 10.6 has been released today as the newest version of the user-space, open-source graphics drivers for Linux and other platforms. Officially only OpenGL 3.3 support is there, but many OpenGL 4.x extensions were implemented over the past three months.

Choosing the Right Linux Desktop Environment Might Be Difficult, but It's Fun and Educational

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GNU
Linux

No matter if you're using a GNU/Linux operating system for some time now or you’ve just started discovering the wonderful and diverse world of Open Source technologies, you will eventually find out that the choices are overwhelming.

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LinuxConsole 2.4 Officially Released, Based on Linux Kernel 4.0.5

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Linux

On June 15, Yann Le Doaré was more than happy to announce the release of his independently developed and lightweight LinuxConsole 2.4 Linux kernel-based operating system.

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Ubuntu-Based Mangaka Linux Nyu Distro for Anime and Manga Fans Reaches RC State

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Linux
Ubuntu

Two weeks after the announcement of the Beta version of the upcoming Mangaka Nyu Linux distribution for anime and manga fans, based on Ubuntu, Animesoft International has released the RC (Release Candidate) version.

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The Linux AIO project: All of a distro's desktops in one ISO

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Linux

If you are working with Linux and, like me, want to explore all of the desktop options of a distro, you’ll wind up downloading an endless list of disk images. I find this both mildly annoying and quite time consuming and apparently so do other people. Much to my pleasure, a small team (Milan Rajcic, Zeljko Popivoda, Erich Eickmeyer, and Milos Mladenovic) decided to do something about it. They created the Linux AIO project.

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IBM bets big on Spark, calling it the Linux of Big Data analytics

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GNU
Linux
Server

The company is putting a major stake in the ground in support of Apache Spark, the high-speed analytics and machine-learning engine that is the hottest thing in Big Data right now. IBM said it will embed Spark into all of of its analytics and ecommerce platforms, commit more than 3,500 researchers and developers to work on Spark-related projects and open-source its SystemML machine learning technology for plug a key hole in the Spark technology stack. It will also offer courses to train more than one million data scientists and engineers to use Spark.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

GNOME Development and Events

  • Dependencies with code generators got a lot smoother with Meson 0.46.0
    Most dependencies are libraries. Almost all build systems can find dependency libraries from the system using e.g. pkg-config. Some can build dependencies from source. Some, like Meson, can do both and toggle between them transparently. Library dependencies might not be a fully solved problem but we as a community have a fairly good grasp on how to make them work. However there are some dependencies where this is not enough. A fairly common case is to have a dependency that has some sort of a source code generator. Examples of this include Protocol Buffers, Qt's moc and glib-mkenums and other tools that come with Glib. The common solution is to look up these binaries from PATH. This works for dependencies that are already installed on the system but fails quite badly when the dependencies are built as subprojects. Bootstrapping is also a bit trickier because you may need to write custom code in the project that provides the executables.
  • Expanding Amtk to support GUIs with headerbar
    I initially created the Amtk library to still be able to conveniently create a traditional UI without using deprecated GTK+ APIs, for GNOME LaTeX. But when working on Devhelp (which has a modern UI with a GtkHeaderBar) I noticed that some pieces of information were duplicated in order to create the menus and the GtkShortcutsWindow.
  • GLib/GIO async operations and Rust futures + async/await
    Unfortunately I was not able to attend the Rust+GNOME hackfest in Madrid last week, but I could at least spend some of my work time at Centricular on implementing one of the things I wanted to work on during the hackfest. The other one, more closely related to the gnome-class work, will be the topic of a future blog post once I actually have something to show.
  • Introducing Chafa
  • Infra Hackfest
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 3 (conclusion)
    I'm back home now, jetlagged but very happy that gnome-class is in a much more advanced a state than it was before the hackfest. I'm very thankful that practically everyone worked on it!
  • GNOME loves Rust Hackfest in Madrid
    The last week was the GNOME loves Rust hackfest in Madrid. I was there, only for the first two days, but was a great experience to meet the people working with Rust in GNOME a great community with a lot of talented people.
  • GNOME Mutter 3.29.1 Now Works With Elogind, Allows For Wayland On Non-Systemd Distros
    GNOME Mutter 3.29.1 has been released as the first development snapshot of this window manager / compositor in the trek towards GNOME 3.30. Mutter 3.29.1 overshot the GNOME 3.29.1 release by one week, but for being a first development release of a new cycle has some pretty interesting changes. Among the work found in Mutter 3.29.1 includes: - Mutter can now be built with elogind. That is the systemd-logind as its own standalone package. This in turn allows using Mutter with its native Wayland back-end on Linux distributions using init systems besides systemd.

KDE: Plasma Widgets, PIM Update and More

  • 3 Students Accepted for Google Summer of Code 2018
    Since 2006, we have had the opportunity for Google to sponsor students to help out with Krita. For 2018 we have 3 talented students working over the summer. Over the next few months they will be getting more familiar with the Krita code base and working on their projects. They will be blogging about their experience and what they are learning along the way. We will be sure to share any progress or information along the way. Here is a summary of their projects and what they hope to achieve.
  • Plasma widgets – Beltway Bandit Unlimited
    The concept of addons is an interesting one. At some point over the past decade or two, companies developing (successful) software realized that bundling an ever-growing code base into their products in order to meet the spiraling tower of requests from their users would result in unsustainable bloat and complexity that would not warrant the new functionality. And so, the idea of addons was born. Addons come in many flavors – extensions, plugins, applets, scripts, and of course, widgets. A large number of popular programs have incorporated them, and when done with style, the extra functionality becomes as important as the core application itself. Examples that come to mind: Firefox, Notepad++, VLC, Blender. And then, there’s the Plasma desktop environment. Since inception, KDE has prided itself on offering complete solutions, and the last incarnation of its UI framework is no different. Which begs the question, what, how and why would anyone need Plasma widgets? We explore. [...] Conclusion A good mean needs no seasoning, indeed. And Plasma is a proof of that, with the widgets the best example. Remarkably, this desktop environment manages to juggle the million different usage needs and create a balanced compromise that offers pretty much everything without over-simplifying the usage in any particular category. It’s a really amazing achievement, because normally, the sum of all requests is a boring, useless muddle. Plasma’s default showing is rich, layered, complex yet accessible, and consistent. And that means it does not really need any widgets. This shows. The extras are largely redundant, with some brilliant occasional usage models here and there, but nothing drastic or critical that you don’t get out of the box. This makes Plasma different from most other addons-blessed frameworks, as they do significantly benefit from the extras, and in some cases, the extensions and plugins are critical in supplementing the missing basics. And so, if you wonder, whether you’ll embark on a wonderful journey of discovery and fun with Plasma widgets, the answer is no. Plasma offers 99% of everything you may need right there, and the extras are more to keep people busy rather than give you anything cardinal. After all, if it’s missing, it should be an integral part of the desktop environment, and the KDE folks know this. So if you’re disappointed with this article, don’t be. It means the baseline is solid, and that’s where you journey of wonders and adventure should and will be focused. 
  • My KDE PIM Update
    This blog post is long overdue, but now that I’m back home from the KDE PIM Sprint in Toulouse, which took place last weekend, there’s some more news to report.
  • KDAB at QtDay 2018
    QtDay is the yearly Italian conference about Qt and Qt-related technologies. Its 2018 edition (the seventh so far!) will be once more in the beautiful city of Florence, on May 23 and 24. And, once more, KDAB will be there.
  • Google Summer of Code 2018 with KDE
    It’s been 2 days since the GSoC accepted student list was announced and I’m still getting goosebumps thinking about the moment I saw my name on the website. I started contributing to open source after attending a GSoC session in our college by one of our senior and a previous GSoC student with KDE: Aroonav Mishra. I was very inspired by the program and that defined the turning point of my life. [...] Then I came across GCompris and it caught my eye. I started contributing to it and the mentors are really very helpful and supportive. They always guided me whenever I needed any help  or was stuck at anything. Under their guidance, I learnt many things during the period of my contributions. I had never thought I would get this far.

GNU/Linux Distributions