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Linux

Q&A: Clement Lefebvre: The man behind Linux Mint

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Linux
Interviews

networkworld.com: The creator of the popular Linux distro talks candidly about his goals, his successes and his nightmares

Torvalds Smashes the Fedora Project, Calls Them Stupid

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Linux

softpedia.com: Linus Torvalds posted a very simple and direct message on Google+ addressed to the Fedora people. What followed next involved accusations and various veiled insults.

John Carmack thinks the Steam Machine’s biggest problem is Linux

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Linux
Gaming

extremetech.com: Ever since Valve announced its three-tier approach to bringing PC gaming to the living room — Steam OS, the Steam Machine, and the Steam Controller — people have been divided on whether or not it’s a sound idea. John Carmack, a man who changed the face of PC gaming at Id Software, thinks the Steam Machine’s odds of succeeding are “a bit dicey.”

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 530

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Linux

Welcome to this year's 42nd issue of DistroWatch Weekly! This past week news feeds in the Linux ecosystem were flooded with reports of Ubuntu, Ubuntu spins and reviews of Ubuntu in its many flavours. This week we bring you early reports of Ubuntu's 13.10 release and some first impressions.

Training Scholarship Winner Nam Pho Uses Linux for Science

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Linux

linux.com: As a first-generation Vietnamese-American, Nam Pho says he learned to make the most of limited resources and opportunities in many facets of his life. When it came to computing, this meant dealing with secondhand hardware. He built his Linux skills through frustrating, but educational, attempts to get old computers up and working again.

9 open source secrets to making money

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Linux
Software
OSS
  • Greed is good: 9 open source secrets to making money
  • How the Linux Foundation is helping the auto industry shift to open source
  • Samba 4.1 brings Linux desktop and Mac files from Windows
  • Senwes Unix to Linux migration
  • On Linux Install Fest 2013
  • Introducing Kids To Linux Using DoudouLinux
  • Have You Tried Parted Magic?
  • AbiWord 3.0 Released With Many Changes, GTK3
  • Another app is currently holding the yum lock; waiting for it to exit…
  • Betting on Linux | CR 71
  • Install the Latest Version of digiKam on Debian
  • Flash in Linux
  • KrISS Feed: Self-Hosted RSS Reader
  • Apt-Fast: Improve Apt-Get Download Speed
  • Fix no screen brightness on boot problem
  • BetaPizza Hackaton Results
  • Can you trust 'NSA-proof' TrueCrypt?
  • 5 Years of KDE Community Forums
  • Open codec pioneer leaves Red Hat, joins Mozilla

Debian 7.2 Update Released

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Linux
  • Debian 7.2 Update Released
  • Easy Ways to Get Going with Linux are on the Rise
  • Choosing A Linux Flavor For Your Datacenter
  • RedHat vs Debian : Administrative Point of View
  • LinuxCon North America 2013
  • Salesforce.com Expands Use of RHEL
  • Watching the Penguin’s Back at All Things Open
  • After 100 Point Releases, Linux 3.0 Is Being EOL'ed
  • FreeBSD 10.0 Now In Beta With Faster ZFS LZJB
  • Windows 8.1 tips, tricks and secrets

Notable Ubuntu Derivatives

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Linux
Ubuntu

linuxadvocates.com: But despite what is or isn't happening with Ubuntu, depending on your point of view, much is happening elsewhere and that is fortunately a 'good thing' for the prospective Linux user.

I tried Fedora 19 KDE one more time

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Linux

dedoimedo.com: My first attempt to use Fedora 19 KDE was not very successful. All in all, it was a blunder. But then I revived my aging LG laptop, which means I decided to give Fedora one more chance.

Mageia 3 Review

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Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: Mageia 3 has been out for a while, and I’ve finally had time to do a review. Mageia is a fork of the Mandriva distribution, and offers quite a bit to desktop Linux users. It comes with a great selection of preinstalled software, and it is available in 32-bit or 64-bit versions on DVD (3.96 GB).

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today's leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Security Leftovers

  • Chrome vulnerability lets attackers steal movies from streaming services
    A significant security vulnerability in Google technology that is supposed to protect videos streamed via Google Chrome has been discovered by researchers from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Cyber Security Research Center (CSRC) in collaboration with a security researcher from Telekom Innovation Laboratories in Berlin, Germany.
  • Large botnet of CCTV devices knock the snot out of jewelry website
    Researchers have encountered a denial-of-service botnet that's made up of more than 25,000 Internet-connected closed circuit TV devices. The researchers with Security firm Sucuri came across the malicious network while defending a small brick-and-mortar jewelry shop against a distributed denial-of-service attack. The unnamed site was choking on an assault that delivered almost 35,000 HTTP requests per second, making it unreachable to legitimate users. When Sucuri used a network addressing and routing system known as Anycast to neutralize the attack, the assailants increased the number of HTTP requests to 50,000 per second.
  • Study finds Password Misuse in Hospitals a Steaming Hot Mess
    Hospitals are pretty hygienic places – except when it comes to passwords, it seems. That’s the conclusion of a recent study by researchers at Dartmouth College, the University of Pennsylvania and USC, which found that efforts to circumvent password protections are “endemic” in healthcare environments and mostly go unnoticed by hospital IT staff. The report describes what can only be described as wholesale abandonment of security best practices at hospitals and other clinical environments – with the bad behavior being driven by necessity rather than malice.
  • Why are hackers increasingly targeting the healthcare industry?
    Cyber-attacks in the healthcare environment are on the rise, with recent research suggesting that critical healthcare systems could be vulnerable to attack. In general, the healthcare industry is proving lucrative for cybercriminals because medical data can be used in multiple ways, for example fraud or identify theft. This personal data often contains information regarding a patient’s medical history, which could be used in targeted spear-phishing attacks.
  • Making the internet more secure
  • Beyond Monocultures
  • Dodging Raindrops Escaping the Public Cloud