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Linux

antiX 15 Officially Released, Based on Debian 8 "Jessie" but Without systemd

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Straight from Thessaloniki, Greece, the antiX development team has had the great pleasure of announcing the immediate availability for download of the final release of the antiX 15 GNU/Linux operating system.

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EU court to decide on PC and software bundling

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
BSD

The Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) is expected to rule within weeks on the practice of forced sale of licences for operating systems and other software bundled with computing devices. On 25 June, France’s Court of cassation referred to the CJEU a complaint of a French citizen who wanted to purchase a PC without any pre-installed operating system.

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Interviews: Linus Torvalds Answers Your Question

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Linus: You can say the word "systemd", It's not a four-letter word. Seven letters. Count them.

I have to say, I don't really get the hatred of systemd. I think it improves a lot on the state of init, and no, I don't see myself getting into that whole area.

Yeah, it may have a few odd corners here and there, and I'm sure you'll find things to despise. That happens in every project. I'm not a huge fan of the binary logging, for example. But that's just an example. I much prefer systemd's infrastructure for starting services over traditional init, and I think that's a much bigger design decision.

Yeah, I've had some personality issues with some of the maintainers, but that's about how you handle bug reports and accept blame (or not) for when things go wrong. If people thought that meant that I dislike systemd, I will have to disappoint you guys.

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Nominate a free software community contributor in Cascadia

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

As the Seattle GNU/Linux conference enters its third year, we decided we could do more to highlight the amazing community in Cascadia (a region on the west coast of the United States that includes Washington, Oregon, British Columbia, and Idaho). This area, especially in Washington, may seem like a haven for proprietary software, but when you take a closer look, you realize people are doing the hard work of helping friends, colleagues, and students embrace free software everywhere.

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Tanglu 3 RC1 Has systemd 221, Linux Kernel 4.0, KDE Plasma 5.3 and GNOME 3.16

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Tanglu development team, through Matthias Klumpp, has announced the immediate availability for download and testing of the first RC (Release Candidate) version of the forthcoming Tanglu 3 GNU/Linux operating system based on Debian 8 "Jessie."

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Simplicity Linux 15.7 Comes at the End of July with Linux Kernel 4.0

Filed under
Linux

David Purse from the development team of Simplicity Linux, a distribution derived from LXPup and built around the LXDE desktop environment, has announced the release of the first Beta build towards the final version of Simplicity Linux 15.7.

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Linux Kernel 3.14.46 LTS Has ARM and ARM64 Improvements, Updated Drivers

Filed under
Linux

After announcing the release of the Linux kernel 4.1.1, Linux kernel 4.0.7, and Linux kernel 3.10.82 LTS, Greg Kroah-Hartman also published details about a new maintenance release of the Linux 3.14 kernel branch.

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Turning Windows users into Linux users with MakuluLinux Aero

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Linux

Slick, sleek, and fast and very Windows-like ... this is a distro that could get your users on the path of OS righteousness

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Arch Linux 2015.07.01 Is Now Available for Download

Filed under
Linux

Being July 1 and all that, that time has come for a new Arch Linux build to surface the Web. Arch Linux 2015.07.01 has been released earlier, and you can download it right now!

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Linux Mint 17.2: If only all penguinista desktops were done this way

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Thankfully this is not the case with Mint 17.2 because the underlying packages from Ubuntu have not changed. You can update to Mint 17.2 directly from Update Manager. That will continue to be true for the rest of the 17.x release cycle (which will last through Ubuntu 16.04, due in April 2016).

And indeed you should upgrade. Given that it's easy and painless to update, combined with all the improvements in this release, Linux Mint 17.2 is well worth it. This is exactly the kind of user-focused release that solves small, everyday problems while leaving the rest of the system alone.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Software: Grafana, Heaptrack, Vim

  • Grafana – An Open Source Software for Analytics and Monitoring
    Grafana is an open source, feature rich, powerful, elegant and highly-extensible analytics and monitoring software that runs on Linux, Windows and MacOS. It is a de facto software for data analytics, being used at Stack Overflow, eBay, PayPal, Uber and Digital Ocean – just to mention but a few. It supports 30+ open source as well as commercial databases/data sources including MySQL, PostgreSQL, Graphite, Elasticsearch, OpenTSDB, Prometheus and InfluxDB. It allows you to dig deeply into large volumes of real-time, operational data; visualize, query, set alerts and get insights from your metrics from differen
  • Heaptrack v1.1.0 release
    Better memory profiling on Linux After more than a year of work, I’m pleased to release another version of heaptrack, the Linux memory profiler! The new version 1.1.0 comes with some new features, significant performance improvements and – most importantly – much improved stability and correctness. If you have tried version v1.0 in the past and encountered problems, update to the new v1.1 and try again!
  • Ten Years of Vim
     

    The philosophy behind Vim takes a while to sink in: While other editors focus on writing as the central part of working with text, Vim thinks it's editing.

     

    You see, most of the time I don't spend writing new text; instead, I edit existing text.

  •  

GNU/Linux: Parrot 4.0, Oregan, Containers and Linux 4.18 Plans

  • Parrot 4.0 is out
    Parrot 4.0 has been released. Parrot is a security-oriented distribution aimed at penetration tests and digital forensics analysis, with additional tools to preserve privacy.
  • Parrot 4.0 release notes
  • Oregan launches SparQ middleware for Linux and Android TV
    Oregan said that the open standards-based offering resolves the differences between the current security and performance requirements of modern-day TV services and the hardware capabilities of STBs that were deployed up to a decade ago.
  • Linux app support coming to older Chrome OS devices
    Linux apps on Chrome OS is one of the biggest developments for the OS since Android apps. Previous reports stated Chromebooks with certain kernel versions would be left in the dust, but the Chrome OS developers have older devices on the roadmap, too. When Google first broke silence on Linux app functionality, it was understood that Linux kernel 4.4 was required to run apps due to dependencies on newer kernel modules. Thanks to an issue found on Chromium’s public bugtracker, we have confirmation that containers won’t be limited to the handful of Chrome OS devices released with kernel 4.4.
  • Looking Ahead To The Linux 4.18 Kernel
    There still are several weeks to go until the Linux 4.17 kernel will be officially released and for that to initiate the Linux 4.18 merge window, but we already know some of the features coming to this next kernel cycle as well as an idea for some other work that may potentially land.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers