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Rugged, wireless-enabled COM runs Linux on AM437x

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Android
Linux

[Updated Mar. 12] — CompuLab’s rugged, SODIMM-style “CM-T43″ COM runs Linux or Android on a TI AM437x, and offers up to 1GB RAM, 32GB flash, dual GbE, WiFi, BLE, NFC, and more.

CompuLab’s CM-T43 computer-on-module uses the same 204-pin SODIMM connectors as its earlier CM-T335, but instead of running on TI’s 600MHz Cortex-A8 Sitara AM335x system-on-chip, it uses the Cortex-A9-based Sitara AM437x SoC, clocked to 800MHz or 1GHz, The 68 x 36mm COM is designed for networking, industrial communications and Internet of Things applications, says CompuLab.

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Bash is more powerful than you think

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Development
Linux

Last week I talked a bit about how best to protect against the vagaries of human error, happenstance, and Murphy’s Law in regard to remote devices. Most of that includes trying to anticipate every possible circumstance that may occur and provide some kind of protection against them, such as remote-controlled power distribution devices that can automatically power-cycle a device if network connectivity is lost or scripts that run on remote devices that can make sure that some form of remote access, such Dropbear SSH, is running and available.

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Zynq-based SBC runs Linux, offers FPGA-based I/O

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Development
Linux

MYIR’s Linux-supported, open-spec “Z-turn Board” uses the hybrid Cortex-A9/FPGA Xilinx Zynq-7010 SoC, and offers sensors, and FPGA expansion connectors.

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Sitara AM437x dev kit targets Linux-based industrial apps

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Linux

TI launched a kit for its Sitara AM437x SoC, focused on multi-protocol industrial communication and motor feedback. with dual PRU-linked Ethernet ports.

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Virginia Tech's Linux Laptop Orchestra puts a new twist on orchestral music

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Bukvic and L²Ork have fostered musical progress since 2009. Using relatively cheap but innovative tools, the group built the world’s first Linux-based laptop orchestra.

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On the Linux Kernel’s Code of Conflict

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Development
Linux

Last week, 60 kernel developers signed off on a small patch called the Code of Conflict that provides guidelines for discourse in the kernel community and outlines a path for mediation if someone feels abused or threatened. The code was written by kernel maintainer Greg K-H, supported by many of the most prolific maintainers and developers of the kernel community and accepted into the kernel by Linus Torvalds himself.

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COM Express module runs Linux on 3.6GHz Bald Eagle

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Linux

GE’s rugged, Linux-ready COM Express Type 6 Basic module integrates AMD’s dual- or quad-core R-Series SoCs at up to 3.6GHz, and offers -40 to 85°C support.

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Don't forget one of Linux's best features: How to use multiple workspaces

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GNU
Linux

Windows users have long been jealous of workspaces—also called virtual desktops or multiple desktops—on Linux. But many Linux desktops have hidden this feature by default in recent years. Soon, Windows users will have multiple desktop workspaces enabled by default—and many Linux users won’t.

That’s crazy! Virtual desktops have long been one of the standout features of the Linux desktop, and it shouldn’t be lost. Here’s how you can get started with workspaces on Ubuntu’s Unity or another desktop environment today.

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FFmpeg 2.6 Released, Install In Ubuntu And Ubuntu Derivatives

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Linux
News
HowTos


FFmpeg 2.6 Released, Install In Ubuntu And Ubuntu Derivatives

FFmpeg can decode, encode, transcode, mux, demux, stream, filter and play everything that humans and machines have created. Team recently released FFmpeg 2.6 with some new features and improvements. We can installFFmpeg 2.6 in Ubuntu and its derivatives.
 

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Steam Machines: The Specs, Prices, and Release Dates

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Following Valve's Steam Machine reveal in 2013, the PC games giant retreated for a year and, at GDC this week, returned to the stage with a robust and detailed line-up of 15 systems.

This collection of a dozen living-room PCs--each now with their finalised specs, prices and release dates--together encapsulate Valve's vision for Steam Machines: Scalable, modifiable, attractive units that aren't the typical desktop setup.

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Also: Steam launches massive Linux game sale to celebrate Steam Machine unveiling

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More in Tux Machines

5 Kubernetes must-reads: Tips and trends

Kubernetes is having a moment – but don’t look for its popularity to wane anytime soon. As enterprises move beyond experimenting and start working in earnest with containers, the number of containers multiply: So do the manual chores. Orchestration tools like Kubernetes add automated help. “Running a few standalone containers for development purposes won’t rob your IT team of time or patience: A standards-based container runtime by itself will do the job,” Red Hat technology evangelist Gordon Haff recently noted. “But once you scale to a production environment and multiple applications spanning many containers, it’s clear that you need a way to coordinate those containers to deliver the individual services. As containers accumulate, complexity grows. Eventually, you need to take a step back and group containers along with the coordinated services they need, such as networking, security, and telemetry.” (See Haff’s full article, How enterprise IT uses Kubernetes to tame container complexity.) Read more

Australian Securities Exchange completes Red Hat migration

The Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) has completed the migration of "mission-critical" legacy applications to the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP). ASX first deployed JBoss EAP in 2011 to modernise its legacy technologies and to facilitate the introduction of new web applications after it realised its legacy application server platform was becoming increasingly inconsistent, unstable, and expensive. After the initial ASX Online Company migration was complete in 2012, ASX used JBoss EAP to build the ASX.com API, as well as its Sharemarket Game, which gives players the opportunity to learn how the share market works. Read more

Programming/Development: GAPID 1.0 and Atom 1.23

  • Diagnose and understand your app's GPU behavior with GAPID
  • GAPID 1.0 Released As Google's Cross-Platform Vulkan Debugger
    Back in March we wrote about GAPID as a new Google-developed Vulkan debugger in its early stages. Fast forward to today, GAPID 1.0 has been released for debugging Vulkan apps/games on Linux/Windows/Android as well as OpenGL ES on Android. GAPID is short for the Graphics API Debugger and allows for analyzing rendering and performance issues with ease using its GUI interface. GAPID also allows for easily experimenting with code changes to see their rendering impact and allows for offline debugging. GAPID has its own format and capturetrace utility for capturing traces of Vulkan (or GLES on Android too) programs for replaying later on with GAPID.
  • Hackable Text Editor Atom 1.23 Adds Better Compatibility for External Git Tools
    GitHub released Atom 1.23, the monthly update of the open-source and cross-platform hackable text editor application loved by numerous developers all over the world. Including a month's worth of enhancements, Atom 1.23 comes with the ability for packages to register URI handler functions, which can be invoked whenever the user visits a URI that starts with "atom://package-name/," and a new option to hide certain commands in the command palette when registering them via "atom.commands.add." Atom 1.23 also improves the compatibility with external Git tools, as well as the performance of the editor by modifying the behavior of several APIs to no longer make callbacks more than once in a text buffer transaction. Along with Atom 1.23, GitHub also released Teletype 0.4.0, a tool that allows developers to collaborate simultaneously on multiple files.

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