Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

Do you need a container-specific Linux distribution?

Filed under
Linux

You've always been able to run containers on a variety of operating systems: Zones on Solaris; Jails on BSD; Docker on Linux and now Windows Server; OpenVZ on Linux, and so on. As Docker in particular and containers in general explode in popularity, operating system companies are taking a different tack. They're now arguing that to make the most of containers you need a skinny operating system to go with them.

Read more

Video: 84-Year-Old Volunteer Rebuilds, Sends Linux Laptops to Africa

Filed under
Linux

Retired pastor James Anderson, age 84, has never worked in IT or had any formal computer training, but over the past two years he has rebuilt more than a hundred IBM ThinkPad laptops and sent them to schools and nonprofits in Africa – all running Linux.

For the past nine years, Anderson has volunteered at FreeGeek, a Portland, Oregon-based nonprofit that recycles and rehabilitates old computers for donation. He spends four hours every Friday testing and rebuilding the ThinkPads, which he then loads with Linux Mint 17 and sends one or two at a time to Africa via personal couriers.

Read more

Tiny UAV-oriented i.MX6 SBC has HDMI in and out

Filed under
Linux

Gateworks unveiled a tiny, UAV-oriented SBC that runs Linux or Android on an i.MX6 SoC, and offers HDMI in/out, USB, serial, GPIO, CAN, mini-PCIe, and more.

Like other Gateworks Ventana boards, such as the recent Ventana GW5200, the tiny “Ventana GW5510″ runs Linux or Android on a Cortex-A9-based Freescale i.MX6 SoC clocked to 800MHz, and offers a wide-range power supply and -40 to 85°C temperature support. Other Ventana-like features include a programmable pushbutton switch, as well as programmable board shut-down and wake-up for remote sensor applications.

Read more

Ultimate Boot CD 5.3.4 Officially Released, Includes PhotoRec 7.0 and TestDisk 7.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Ultimate Boot CD, an ISO image that gathers together all the necessary tools for helping users with advanced system repair tasks and general system maintenance, reached version 5.3.4.

Read more

Also: MakuluLinux 9 Xfce Is Available for Download, Based on Ubuntu 14.04.2 LTS and Xfce 4.12

Korora MATE Has Returned and It Looks Gorgeous, Based on Fedora 21

Linux Widens HPC Goalposts

Filed under
Linux

It is well known that the term “high performance computing” (HPC) originally describes the use of parallel processing for running advanced application programs efficiently, reliably and quickly. The term applies especially to systems that function above a teraflop or 10^12 floating-point operations per second, and is also often used as a synonym for supercomputing. Technically a supercomputer is a system that performs at or near the currently highest operational rate for computers. To increase systems performance, over time the industry has moved from uni-processor to SMP to distributed-memory clusters, and finally to multicore and manycore chips.

However, for a growing number of users and vendors, HPC today refers not to cores, cycles, or FLOPS but to discovery, efficiency, or time to market. Some years ago, IDC came up with the interpretation of HPC to High Productivity Computing, highlighting the idea that HPC provides a more effective and scalable productivity to customers, and this term fits really well for most commercial customers.

Read more

5 of the Best Raspberry Pi Projects Out There

Filed under
Linux

Raspberry Pi, when first launched about two years ago, became an instant phenomenon. After all, who could have thought of a $35 computer that lets you browse the web and does most of your office work? What is even more surprising is the reception it got from average users. Usually, one would expect a bare-minimum $35 board computer that runs Linux to be popular only among developers or geeks. However, as many as 100,000 Raspberry Pi units were sold on the day of its launch eventually selling more than 2.5 million units till date.

Completely open-source, Raspberry Pi lets you do most of the basic tasks you'd normally do on a full-fledged desktop. You can browse the web, you can create documents, and you can even play music and watch videos. When it comes to desktop computers, Raspberry Pi is a veritable "Starter's Edition." Since its inception, the project has made common computing available to parts of the world where owning a desktop was once considered a luxury. Moreover, it has also spurred a flurry of interesting projects that take this tiny superboard to a whole new level. If you are ready to show your creative, geeky side, then read on as we cover some of the best Raspberry Pi projects out there.

Read more

Leaked Images of the upcoming Samsung Z2 Tizen Smart Phone?

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

We have mentioned previously about the rumoured upcoming Samsung Z2 Smartphone and an un-named Global Tizen Smartphone. Well today these are allegedly leaked images of the Samsung Z2, a Tizen based Quad core Smartphone with 1Gb memory, 540 x 960 Screen to be released 1H 2015, which is potentially only a few weeks away.

Read more

Ultimate Boot CD Live Aims to Become a Parted Magic Replacement, Based on Debian

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

The development team behind the popular UBCD (Ultimate Boot CD) project have announced recently that they are working on a Live version of Ultimate Boot CD, which is currently based on the Debian GNU/Linux operating system and has the ultimate goal of becoming a Parted Magic replacement.

Read more

Linux Kernel 3.14.40 LTS Arrives with ARM Improvements, Updated Drivers

Filed under
Linux

Linux kernel 3.14.40 LTS arrived a few days ago, as announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman on the kernel mailinglist, and it brings a number of important improvements to the ARM and PowerPC architectures, as well as several updated drivers.

Read more

Tails 1.4 RC1 Anonymous Live CD Uses Tor Browser 4.5 and Debian 8 Jessie Sources

Filed under
Linux
Security

The Tails development team announced the immediate availability for download and testing of the first Release Candidate (RC) version of the upcoming Tails 1.4 amnesic incognito Live CD distribution that has been used by Edward Snowden to stay invisible online and browse websites anonymously.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Thousands of FedEx customers' private info exposed in legacy server data breach

    Uncovered by Kromtech Security Center, the parent company of MacKeeper Security, the breach exposed data such as passport information, driver's licenses and other high profile security IDs, all of which were hosted on a password-less Amazon S3 storage server.

  • Correlated Cryptojacking

    they include The City University of New York (cuny.edu), Uncle Sam's court information portal (uscourts.gov), Lund University (lu.se), the UK's Student Loans Company (slc.co.uk), privacy watchdog The Information Commissioner's Office (ico.org.uk) and the Financial Ombudsman Service (financial-ombudsman.org.uk), plus a shedload of other .gov.uk and .gov.au sites, UK NHS services, and other organizations across the globe.

    Manchester.gov.uk, NHSinform.scot, agriculture.gov.ie, Croydon.gov.uk, ouh.nhs.uk, legislation.qld.gov.au, the list goes on.

  • Facebook using 2FA cell numbers for spam, replies get posted to the platform

    Replies ending up as comments appears to be a bizarre bug, but the spamming seems intentional.

  • Swedish Police website hacked [sic] to mine cryptocurrency

    Remember now, it is a Police Force that allowed their website to be hijacked by this simple attack vector. The authority assigned to serve and protect. More specifically, the authority that argues that wiretapping is totally safe because the Police is competent in IT security matters, so there’s no risk whatsoever your data will leak or be mishandled.

    This is one of the websites that were trivially hacked [sic].

    It gives pause for thought.

    It also tells you what you already knew: authorities can’t even keep their own dirtiest laundry under wraps, so the notion that they’re capable or even willing to protect your sensitive data is hogwash of the highest order.

  • New EU Privacy Law May Weaken Security

    In a bid to help domain registrars comply with the GDPR regulations, ICANN has floated several proposals, all of which would redact some of the registrant data from WHOIS records. Its mildest proposal would remove the registrant’s name, email, and phone number, while allowing self-certified 3rd parties to request access to said data at the approval of a higher authority — such as the registrar used to register the domain name.

    The most restrictive proposal would remove all registrant data from public WHOIS records, and would require legal due process (such as a subpoena or court order) to reveal any information supplied by the domain registrant.

  • Intel hit with 32 lawsuits over security flaws

    Intel Corp said on Friday shareholders and customers had filed 32 class action lawsuits against the company in connection with recently-disclosed security flaws in its microchips.

  • The Risks of "Responsible Encryption"

    Federal law enforcement officials in the United States have recently renewed their periodic demands for legislation to regulate encryption. While they offer few technical specifics, their general proposal—that vendors must retain the ability to decrypt for law enforcement the devices they manufacture or communications their services transmit—presents intractable problems that would-be regulators must not ignore.

  • Reviewing SSH Mastery 2nd Ed

    It’s finally out ! Michael W Lucas is one of the best authors of technical books out there. I was curious about this new edition. It is not a reference book, but covers the practical aspects of SSH that I wish everybody knew. Rather than aggregating different articles/blogs on SSH, this book covers 90% of the common use cases for SSH that you will ever encounter.

Android Leftovers

Amazon Linux 2 - Who nicked my cheese?

So far, it's a relatively benign, easy introduction to a new operating system that blends the familiar and new in a timid package. Perhaps that's the goal, because a radical offering would right away scare everyone. Amazon Linux 2 is an appealing concept, as it gives users what Red Hat never quite did (yet) - A Fedora-like bleeding-edge tech with the stability and long-term support of the mainstay enterprise offering. But then, it also pulls a Debian/Ubuntu stunt by breaking ABI, so it will be cubicle to those who enjoying living la vida loco (in their cubicle or open-space prison). Having lived and breathed the large-scale HPC world for many years, I am quite piqued to see how this will evolve. Performance, stability and ease of use will be my primary concerns. Then, is it possible to hook up a remote virtual machine into the EC2 hive? That's another experiment, and I'd like to see if scaling and deployment works well over distributed networks. Either way, even if nothing comes out of it, Amazon Linux 2 is a nice start to a possibly great adventure. Or yet another offspring in the fragmented family we call Linux. Time will tell. Off you go. Cloud away. Read more

Updates From OpenIndiana and LibreOffice (Projects That Oracle Discarded)

  • Migration to GCC 6.4 as userland compiler
    Modulo some minor details, the transition of our userland to GCC 6 is complete.
  • OpenIndiana Has Upgraded To The GCC 6 Compiler
    The OpenSolaris/Illumos-based OpenIndiana operating system has finally moved past GCC 4.9 as its base user-land compiler and is now using GCC 6.4. This comes while GCC 8.1 should be officially released in the next few weeks and they are already targeting GCC 7.3.0 as their next illumos-gate compiler.
  • LibreOffice 6.0 Open-Source Office Suite Passes 1 Million Downloads Mark
    The Document Foundation announced recently that its LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite reached almost 1 million downloads since its release last month on January 31, 2018. That's terrific news for the Open Source and Free Software community and a major milestone for the acclaimed LibreOffice office suite, which tries to be a free alternative to proprietary solutions like Microsoft Office. The 1 million downloads mark was reached just two weeks after the release of LibreOffice 6.0, which is the biggest update ever of the open-source office suite adding numerous new features and enhancements over previous versions.