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Linux

7 Neat Linux Tricks That Newbies Need to Know

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GNU
Linux

As a Linux newbie, it’s normal to struggle. Everything just feels so different from Windows and you find yourself scratching your head at the simplest of tasks. And while the command line makes Linux life much easier, it can be intimidating for a beginner.

Fortunately, all it takes is a few simple tricks to get you comfortable within the terminal. Give it a few days and you may actually end up preferring the command line! Granted, there is a learning curve, but it’s not as hard as you think. I promise.

If you’ve never used the command line before, I’d recommend that you first get acquainted with terminal before continuing. But if you’re feeling confident, feel free to keep reading anyway.

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Lightweight Desktop For Linux: What’s the Best One for You?

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GNU
Linux

When it comes to Linux, it seems like most people talk about the desktop environments with the most eye candy. While those desktops are great in their own way, they’re not for everyone. Not everyone is looking for something graphically intensive and pretty.

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Introducing Blueberry, a Proper Bluetooth Configuration Tool for Linux Mint

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Linux

On March 12, Clement Lefebvre had the pleasure of announcing a new tool that will be implemented in the upcoming Linux Mint Debian Edition 2 (codename Betsy) computer operating system. The tool is called Blueberry and allows users to properly configure Bluetooth on Linux Mint OSes.

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Ubuntu just switched to systemd, the project sparking controversy throughout Linux

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Linux
Ubuntu

It’s official: Ubuntu is the latest Linux distribution to switch to systemd.

After a civil war in Debian that spawned a fork named Devuan, Ubuntu has now flipped the switch. Ubuntu announced plans to switch to systemd a year ago, so this is no surprise. Systemd replaces Ubuntu’s own Upstart, an init daemon created back in 2006.

As the official announcement says, “brace for impact.”

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Review: New Chromebook Pixel is still lovely hardware with limited appeal

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Chromebooks are cheap. They work best that way. It’s rare to find one north of $400, and the sweet spot is between $200 and $300. While they've got shortcomings, the cost is reasonable for what you get. In some cases, the limitations are even desirable.

Only one Chromebook has truly gone against that grain—the Chromebook Pixel. It was the polar opposite of every other device bearing the name. The Pixel was high-quality hardware where others are low-rent, but even though it cost five times what you could pay for a regular Chromebook it didn't really do much more. It's a laptop as nice as it is niche.

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Hands on: Google's new $999 Chromebook Pixel makes big changes under the hood

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GNU
Linux
Google

Two years is eons in tech time, and that’s how long we’ve had to wait for a new Chromebook Pixel, which Google announced Wednesday. Yes, this is a new version of the super-premium, high-priced flagship that debuted to oohs, ahhs, and whys in early 2013, when most Chromebooks were little cheap plastic things, and desktop applications dominated. Not everyone saw the potential of a high-priced browser box.

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7 surprising facts about Linux

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Linux

There are seven things that we think you do not know yet about Linux and why it is a remarkable software project.

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New Linux Foundation Members Invest in Linux and Collaborative Development

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Linux

The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux and collaborative development, today announced that LMAX Exchange Ltd., Linutronix GmbH, NI and SerenataFlowers.com are joining the organization.

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New Linux Kernel Vulnerability Patched in All Supported Ubuntu OSes

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Linux
Ubuntu

Canonical, through John Johansen, has announced earlier today, March 12, that a newly discovered Linux kernel vulnerability has been patched in the kernel packages of Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn), Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin), and Ubuntu 10.04 LTS (Lucid Lynx).

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More in Tux Machines

10 Best Linux Business Apps

There’s no question that the Linux desktop can be a highly effective workhorse. Note, as proof of this, the greater coverage in the media of the best business apps for Linux. Keep reading for the best Linux business apps – and please add your own favorite in the Comments section below. Read more

Android Leftovers

FreeBSD-Based TrueOS 17.12 Released

The FreeBSD-based operating system TrueOS that's formerly known as PC-BSD has put out their last stable update of 2017. TrueOS 17.12 is now available as the latest six-month stable update for this desktop-focused FreeBSD distribution that also offers a server flavor. TrueOS continues using OpenRC as its init system and this cycle they have continued improving their Qt5-based Lumina desktop environment, the Bhyve hypervisor is now supported in the TrueOS server install, improved removable device support, and more. Read more

An introduction to Joplin, an open source Evernote alternative

Joplin is an open source cross-platform note-taking and to-do application. It can handle a large number of notes, organized into notebooks, and can synchronize them across multiple devices. The notes can be edited in Markdown, either from within the app or with your own text editor, and each application has an option to render Markdown with formatting, images, URLs, and more. Any number of files, such as images and PDFs, can be attached to a note, and notes can also be tagged. I started developing Joplin when Evernote changed its pricing model and because I wanted my 4,000+ notes to be stored in a more open format, free of any proprietary solution. To that end, I have developed three Joplin applications, all under the MIT License: for desktop (Windows, MacOS, and Linux), for mobile (Android and iOS), and for the terminal (Windows, MacOS, and Linux). All the applications have similar user interfaces and can synchronize with each other. They are based on open standards and technologies including SQLite and JavaScript for the backend, and Terminal Kit (Node.js), Electron, and React Native for the three front ends. Read more