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Linux

10 of the best Linux distros for privacy fiends and security buffs

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Linux distributions can be separated into various categories based on use case and the intended target group. Server, education, games and multimedia are some of the most popular categories of Linux distros.

For security conscious users, however, there's a growing niche of distros aimed at protecting your privacy. These distros help ensure you don't leave a digital footprint as you go about navigating the web.

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4MLinux 12.0 Allinone Edition FINAL released.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The status of the 4MLinux 12.0 series has been changed to STABLE. Major modifications in the core of the system, which now includes the GNU C Library 2.21. Additionally, PAE support has been enabled in the Linux kernel. The most important new applications are: Asunder (CD-ripping program), aTunes (audio player), and Chrome (web browser). The net browsing software available in 4MLinux has been significantly improved (see: the 4MLinux Blog).

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Linux Kernel 3.14.41 LTS Brings In ARM, PowerPC, Xtensa, x86, and Btrfs Fixes

Filed under
Linux

After announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.0.2 and Linux kernel 3.19.7, Greg Kroah-Hartman was happy to announce a new maintenance version of the LTS (Long Term Support) Linux kernel 3.14, which means that all users of 3.14 kernel series must upgrade immediately.

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Cutegram 2.2.0 Telegram Client For Linux Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint/Debian Based Distros

Filed under
Linux
News
HowTos


Cutegram 2.2.0 Telegram Client For Linux Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint/Debian Based Distros

Cutegram a nice Telegram client for Linux has released Cutegram 2.2.0with speed improvement, Username and Hashtag suggestion, search selected text on the web, bug fixes and many more. Cutegram also has support for Emoji. In this article I'll be showing you some more features of Cutegram and also how to install Cutegram on Ubuntu 15.04/14.10/14.04 and Linux Mint and Other debian based Linux distributions.
 

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

Canonical Apologies for Linux Kernel Regression in Ubuntu 14.10 and 14.04 LTS

Filed under
Linux

We reported earlier this week that a vulnerability discovered recently in the Linux kernel packages of Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet), Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn), Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) has been addressed.

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Tizen Common Running on the HummingBoard-i2eX

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Linux

Development board lovers, some news for you today. Our friend Leon, with the assistance of his colleagues in the Konsulko Group, has successfully built Tizen:Common with Linux kernel 3.14.14 using Yocto. The target dev board is the HummingBoard-i2eX (Freescale i.MX6 SoC) and interestingly hardware accelerated graphics is supported in Wayland/Weston 1.6.

He used the existing fixes at the tizen-distro for Raspberry Pi 2 and we applied several changes:

EGL support was enabled in Wayland/Weston recipes
Vivante EGL and GAL2D compositor support was added
Systemd services were modified to launch Weston with hardware graphics acceleration

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Beautiful Budgie 8.2 Desktop Environment Is Out - Gallery

Filed under
Linux

Budgie is a new desktop environment that has been making quite a few waves into the Linux community. It's used to power the Solus operating system, and a new version has been released, pushing the version number to 8.2.

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New Linux rootkit leverages GPUs to hide

Filed under
Linux

A team of developers has created a rootkit for Linux systems that uses the processing power and memory of graphics cards instead of CPUs in order to remain hidden.

The rootkit, called Jellyfish, is a proof of concept designed to demonstrate that completely running malware on GPUs (graphics processing units) is a viable option. This is possible because dedicated graphics cards have their own processors and RAM.

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System76 Meerkat: The Perfect Mini PC for Multimedia or Desktop

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Every so often I get the pleasure of writing a review where the biggest challenge is finding something, anything, to nitpick in order to ensure I don’t sound like I’ve been bought off by the company. Such is the case with the Meerkat, by System76. A small device that, at first blush, one might think a toy. I can assure you, this 4.5” by 4.5” device performs with the power of a machine three or four times its size.

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More in Tux Machines

LMMS Guide Part 1: Creating Simple Melodies Using Sounds And Instruments

​LMMS stands for Linux Multimedia Studio. It is a very good open-source program that is used to create music tracks using sound files, predefined instruments, and sound effects. LMMS has versions for Windows and macOS in addition to Linux. Their website, of course, lists all of their features offered to users. This article will attempt to provide practical guides and tips for composing songs using LMMS. Read
more

How To Create Shell Scripts

Having to type the same command over and over again can be a daunting task and tiresome for that matter. The shell scripts are really easy to create and run saving you from a lot of misery and anguish if you really prefer using the terminal over using the GUI for running tasks. Read
more

Today in Techrights

Security Leftovers

  • Thousands of FedEx customers' private info exposed in legacy server data breach

    Uncovered by Kromtech Security Center, the parent company of MacKeeper Security, the breach exposed data such as passport information, driver's licenses and other high profile security IDs, all of which were hosted on a password-less Amazon S3 storage server.

  • Correlated Cryptojacking

    they include The City University of New York (cuny.edu), Uncle Sam's court information portal (uscourts.gov), Lund University (lu.se), the UK's Student Loans Company (slc.co.uk), privacy watchdog The Information Commissioner's Office (ico.org.uk) and the Financial Ombudsman Service (financial-ombudsman.org.uk), plus a shedload of other .gov.uk and .gov.au sites, UK NHS services, and other organizations across the globe.

    Manchester.gov.uk, NHSinform.scot, agriculture.gov.ie, Croydon.gov.uk, ouh.nhs.uk, legislation.qld.gov.au, the list goes on.

  • Facebook using 2FA cell numbers for spam, replies get posted to the platform

    Replies ending up as comments appears to be a bizarre bug, but the spamming seems intentional.

  • Swedish Police website hacked [sic] to mine cryptocurrency

    Remember now, it is a Police Force that allowed their website to be hijacked by this simple attack vector. The authority assigned to serve and protect. More specifically, the authority that argues that wiretapping is totally safe because the Police is competent in IT security matters, so there’s no risk whatsoever your data will leak or be mishandled.

    This is one of the websites that were trivially hacked [sic].

    It gives pause for thought.

    It also tells you what you already knew: authorities can’t even keep their own dirtiest laundry under wraps, so the notion that they’re capable or even willing to protect your sensitive data is hogwash of the highest order.

  • New EU Privacy Law May Weaken Security

    In a bid to help domain registrars comply with the GDPR regulations, ICANN has floated several proposals, all of which would redact some of the registrant data from WHOIS records. Its mildest proposal would remove the registrant’s name, email, and phone number, while allowing self-certified 3rd parties to request access to said data at the approval of a higher authority — such as the registrar used to register the domain name.

    The most restrictive proposal would remove all registrant data from public WHOIS records, and would require legal due process (such as a subpoena or court order) to reveal any information supplied by the domain registrant.

  • Intel hit with 32 lawsuits over security flaws

    Intel Corp said on Friday shareholders and customers had filed 32 class action lawsuits against the company in connection with recently-disclosed security flaws in its microchips.

  • The Risks of "Responsible Encryption"

    Federal law enforcement officials in the United States have recently renewed their periodic demands for legislation to regulate encryption. While they offer few technical specifics, their general proposal—that vendors must retain the ability to decrypt for law enforcement the devices they manufacture or communications their services transmit—presents intractable problems that would-be regulators must not ignore.

  • Reviewing SSH Mastery 2nd Ed

    It’s finally out ! Michael W Lucas is one of the best authors of technical books out there. I was curious about this new edition. It is not a reference book, but covers the practical aspects of SSH that I wish everybody knew. Rather than aggregating different articles/blogs on SSH, this book covers 90% of the common use cases for SSH that you will ever encounter.