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Fedora-Based Qubes OS 3.0 Release Candidate 1 Linux Distro Now Available for Testing

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Linux
Red Hat

Joanna Rutkowska announced the immediate availability for download and testing of the first Release Candidate version of the forthcoming Qubes OS 3.0 computer operating system based on the Fedora Linux distribution.

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Debian GNU/Linux 9.0 Will Be Named Stretch

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GNU
Linux
Debian

On April 26, the Debian Release Team, through Niels Thykier, announced that the next major release of the acclaimed Debian GNU/Linux computer operating system will be named Stretch.

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Linux 4.1-rc1

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Linux

It's been a normal merge window, and I'm releasing according to the
normal schedule. The few days of travel didn't seem to matter, as I
had internet access at all times.

The merge window is pretty normal in terms of what got merged too.
Just eyeballing the size, it looks like this is going to fit right in
- while 4.0 was a bit smaller than usual, 4.1 seems to be smack dab in
the middle of the normal range for the last couple of years. And all
the patch statistics look normal as well: the bulk of the changes are
to drivers (just under 60% of the patch), with arch updates being
about 20% of it all, and the rest is spread all over.

No earth-shattering new features come to mind, even if initial support
for ACPI on arm64 looks funny. Depending on what you care about, your
notion of "big new feature" may differ from mine, of course. There's a
lot of work all over, and some of it might just make a big difference
to your use cases.

So go out and test. Even -rc1, as raw as it may sometimes be, has
tended to be pretty good. It's not that scary. Promise.

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8 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 15.04 Vivd Vervet

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Linux
Ubuntu
HowTos


enable always show menus in Ubuntu 15.04 vivid vervet

As people are taking poll on our Ubuntu 15.04 released post, it seems people are interested in the tweaks and improvements made in Vivid Vervet. But you might get confused when you upgrade to Vivid Vervet that all the tweaks are not enabled by default. So how to enable them? Here in this post I'm going to show you how to enjoy latest tweaks and configure Vivid Vervet ease of use features.

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

Systemd Kills Off Shutdownd

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Linux

Systemd has eliminated shutdownd, one of the oldest components of this controversial init system, but its removal isn't because systemd is going on a diet.

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Linux-friendly i.MX6 SBC is loaded with I/O, supports PoE

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Linux

Gateworks’s latest Ventana SBC runs Linux, OpenWRT, and Android on an i.MX6 SoC, and offers A/V, serial, and mini-PCIe I/O, plus wide temperature operation.

The Ventana GW5220 is nearly identical to the Ventana GW5200 SBC announced in 2013, “but only supports PCIe signaling on one mIni-PCIe slot and adds SPI support,” says Gateworks. Like the other Ventana SBCs, including the recent, higher-end Ventana GW5520, the new GW5220 supports -40 to 85°C temperatures, and runs OpenWrt, OpenEmbedded/Yocto, or Android on a Freescale i.MX6 SoC. Like the GW5200, it supports the dual-core i.MX6 Dual version at 800MHz, and measures 100 x 70mm.

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GNU/Linux Share of Global Page-Views Reaches New High

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GNU
Linux

Eight days in April, 2015, so far, have reached 2% share of page-views for GNU/Linux on the desktop worldwide, according to data from StatCounter.

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Linux Kernel 4.0 Update Kit Now Available for Black Lab Linux 6.5, Ubuntu 15.04

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Linux

Roberto J. Dohnert announced the immediate availability of the Linux Kernel 4.0 Update Kit for his Black Lab Linux computer operating system, allowing users to update to the newly released Linux 4.0 kernel.

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Parsix GNU/Linux 7.5 Test 3 Out Now with Linux 3.14.38 LTS, Based on Debian Wheezy

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GNU
Linux
Debian

The Parsix GNU/Linux team announced on April 25 the immediate availability for download and testing of the third development release of the upcoming Parsix GNU/Linux 7.5 computer operating system.

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Open-source IoT kit runs OpenWRT, mimics Arduino Yun

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Linux

A “Domino.IO” Kickstarter project offers an Atheros AR9331 module running OpenWRT Linux, plus two tiny baseboards, one of which is Arduino Yun compatible.

To stand out from the growing number of OpenWRT Linux-based computer-on-modules and tiny, com-LIKE single board computers running Qualcomm’s WiFi-ready Atheros AR9331 system-on-chip, startups are now offering entire modular kit families based on an AR9331. Last month, we saw an Onion OmegaKickstarter project, which has since been funded, based on an AR9331 COM with stackable expansion modules. Now a Hong Kong based startup called Domino.IO has gone on Kickstarter to sell its own kit that expands on a Domino Core COM with Domino Pi and Domino Qi expansion boards, as well as smaller I/O modules that enable further customization.

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More in Tux Machines

KaOS 2018.01 KDE-focused Linux distro now available with Spectre and Meltdown fixes

It can be difficult to find a quality Linux distribution that meets your needs. This is partly because there are just too many operating systems from which to choose. My suggestion is to first find a desktop environment that you prefer, and then narrow down your distro search to one that focuses on that DE. For instance, if you like KDE, both Kubuntu and Netrunner are solid choices. With all of that said, there is another KDE-focused Linux distro that I highly recommend. Called "KaOS," it is rolling release, meaning you can alway be confident that your computer is running modern packages. Today, KaOS gets its first updated ISO for 2018, and you should definitely use it to upgrade your install media. Why? Because version 2018.01 has fixes for Spectre and Meltdown thanks to Linux kernel 4.14.14 with both AMD and Intel ucode. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

  • Linux and Qt in Automotive? Let’s meet up!
    For anyone around the Gothenburg area on Feb 1st, you are most welcome to the Automotive MeetUp held at the Pelagicore and Luxoft offices. There will be talks about Qt/QML, our embedded Linux platform PELUX and some ramblings about open source in automotive by yours truly ;-)
  • What about AppImage?
    I see a lot of people asking about state of AppImage support in Discover. It’s non-existent, because AppImage does not require centralized software management interfaces like Discover and GNOME Software (or a command-line package manager). AppImage bundles are totally self-contained, and come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and can be managed on the filesystem using your file manager This should sound awfully familiar to former Mac users (like myself), because Mac App bundles are totally self-contained, come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and are managed using the Finder file manager.
  • What’s new for January? Plasma5 18.01, and more
    When I sat down to write a new post I noticed that I had not written a single post since the previous Plasma 5 announcement. Well, I guess the past month was a busy one. Also I bought a new e-reader (the Kobo Aura H2O 2nd edition) to replace my ageing Sony PRS-T1. That made me spend a lot of time just reading books and enjoying a proper back-lit E-ink screen. What I read? The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams, A Shadow all of Light by Fred Chappell, Persepolis Rising and several of the short stories (Drive, The Butcher of Anderson Station, The Churn and Strange Dogs) by James SA Corey and finally Red Sister by Mark Lawrence. All very much worth your time.

GNU/Linux: Live Patching, Gravity of Kubernetes, Welcome to 2018

  • How Live Patching Has Improved Xen Virtualization
    The open-source Xen virtualization hypervisor is widely deployed by enterprises and cloud providers alike, which benefit from the continuous innovation that the project delivers. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Lars Kurth, Chairman of the Xen Project Advisory Board and Director, Open Source Solutions at Citrix, details some of the recent additions to Xen and how they are helping move the project forward.
  • The Gravity of Kubernetes
    Most new internet businesses started in the foreseeable future will leverage Kubernetes (whether they realize it or not). Many old applications are migrating to Kubernetes too. Before Kubernetes, there was no standardization around a specific distributed systems platform. Just like Linux became the standard server-side operating system for a single node, Kubernetes has become the standard way to orchestrate all of the nodes in your application. With Kubernetes, distributed systems tools can have network effects. Every time someone builds a new tool for Kubernetes, it makes all the other tools better. And it further cements Kubernetes as the standard.
  • Welcome to 2018
    The image of the technology industry as a whole suffered in 2017, and that process is likely to continue this year as well. That should lead to an increased level of introspection that will certainly affect the free-software community. Many of us got into free software to, among other things, make the world a better place. It is not at all clear that all of our activities are doing that, or what we should do to change that situation. Expect a lively conversation on how our projects should be run and what they should be trying to achieve. Some of that introspection will certainly carry into projects related to machine learning and similar topics. There will be more interesting AI-related free software in 2018, but it may not all be beneficial. How well will the world be served, for example, by a highly capable, free facial-recognition system and associated global database? Our community will be no more effective than anybody else at limiting progress of potentially freedom-reducing technologies, but we should try harder to ensure that our technologies promote and support freedom to the greatest extent possible. Our 2017 predictions missed the fact that an increasing number of security problems are being found at the hardware level. We'll not make the same mistake in 2018. Much of what we think of as "hardware" has a great deal of software built into it — highly proprietary software that runs at the highest privilege levels and which is not subject to third-party review. Of course that software has bugs and security issues of its own; it couldn't really be any other way. We will see more of those issues in 2018, and many of them are likely to prove difficult to fix.