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Linux 3.16-rc1 - merge window closed

Filed under
Linux

So it's been two weeks since the merge window opened, and rc1 is out
there and thus the merge window is closed.

It may have been a slightly unusual two week merge window, in that
it's only one week since the release of 3.15 and the first week
overlapped with the last -rc for that previous release, but that
doesn't seem to have affected development much. Things look normal,
and if anything, this is one of the bigger release windows rather than
on the smaller side. It's not quite as big as the merge window for
3.15, but it's actually not that far off.

It also looks fairly usual from a statistics standpoint: about two
thirds of the changes are to drivers (and one third of *that* is to
staging), and half of the remainder is architecture updates (with arm
dominating, dts files leading - but there's mips, powerpc, x86 and
arm64 there too).

Outside of drivers and architecture updates, there's the usual mixture
of changes elsewhere: filesystems (mainly reiserfs, xfs, btrfs, nfs),
networking, "core" kernel (mm, locking, scheduler, tracing), and
tooling (perf and power, also new self-tests).

Also as usual, the shortlog is much too big to be generally useful and
posted as part of this announcement, but you can obviously look at the
details in git. I'm posting the "mergelog" as usual, which I think is
a slightly better way to see the high-level picture. And as usual, it
credits not the people who necessarily wrote the code, but the
submaintainers that sent it to me. For real credits, see the git tree.

Go forth and test,

Linus

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The history of Android: The endless iterations of Google’s mobile OS

Filed under
Android
Linux

Android has been with us in one form or another for more than six years. During that time, we've seen an absolutely breathtaking rate of change unlike any other development cycle that has ever existed. When it came time for Google to dive in to the smartphone wars, the company took its rapid-iteration, Web-style update cycle and applied it to an operating system, and the result has been an onslaught of continual improvement. Lately, Android has even been running on a previously unheard of six-month development cycle, and that's slower than it used to be. For the first year of Android’s commercial existence, Google was putting out a new version every two-and-a-half months.

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Best Weather Applications for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

It is hard to keep up with the weather at times. If you are living in a place where the weather is unpredictable, knowing if it is going to rain or not makes a huge difference to you. That's why you need to keep yourself updated about the weather from time to time.

If you are using Ubuntu or other Linux distro, this isn't hard to do. Linux offers a plethora of options for users to keep an eye on the weather. Here is a selection of some of the best weather applications for your Linux desktop.

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5 reasons why you should switch from Windows XP to Lubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Windows XP is dead. Some people may not be aware of this fact but I'm telling you now "That parrot is dead".

Microsoft ended support for Windows XP on April 8th 2014 but what does end of support mean? Does it mean it doesn't work anymore?

Actually, Windows XP will continue to work perfectly well for quite some time but the trouble is that any remaining security holes will remain unplugged and that leaves a huge opportunity for the cyber criminals to exploit any individual or organisation that remains on that platform.

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Also: Announcing Lubuntu Week

The World Cup of Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

At some point or other 23 of the 32 nations have had a Linux distribution. As you can see by the list I have had to name some discontinued distros and this is the nature of Linux.

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Debian Testing: FreeBSD 10.0 vs. Linux 3.14 Kernels

Filed under
Linux
Debian
BSD

For some tests the performance doesn't deviate much between Debian GNU/Linux and Debian GNU/kFreeBSD given that both have a similar user-land. For our many source-based computational tests, the main factor to point out is that both GNU/Linux and GNU/kFreeBSD versions of 7.5 Wheezy have GCC 4.7 while the latest testing versions of these open-source operating systems are using the GCC 4.8 stable series.

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Linux email clients – the road less traveled

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

One area on the Linux desktop that remains surprisingly conservative is email – email clients and webmail alike. While most if not all of the formats and protocols used are true open standards, you would think there could be a broad range of clients and webmails for Linux out there. Let me correct that: webmails are in a league of their own and I will not enter the webmail vs. email clients discussion. Many things are changing in that field, but one must differentiate between the actual email service, like GMail, your corporate mail, the webmail software (Roundcube, Horde, Citadel, Squirrel, etc.), the groupware platform (Kolab, Blue Mind, OBM, eGroupWare, and many others) and what lands and gets edited, if you’ve chosen so, in your email client, meaning the actual software program running distinctly from your web browser and handling anything from emails to calendars and contacts. Today I will focus on the email clients on the Linux desktop. I do not pretend that my list is exhaustive; it is but a personal selection; I have also excluded email client such as Mutt, mu4e, VM, RMail, Ner, Wanderlust, etc. as I will only be speaking of graphical email clients on Linux, at least the ones I’ve tried.

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Chrome OS Features to Look for in Current Chromebook Crop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

While users were uncertain at first about the concept of using a Web-based operating system, Chrome OS morphed into something far more usable and appealing to the average computer user since it was first released in 2009. Not only are computer users more comfortable with accessing cloud applications and storing their data in the cloud, but Google has added a number of features that make it convenient to use Chrome OS productively.

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Samsung Chromebook 2 review

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Reviews

Two years ago, Samsung made the first great Chromebook. It was thin, and light, and had good battery life, but most of all it was a different kind of computer. Chrome OS wasn’t like Windows, which can do absolutely everything on earth including a laundry list of things that only confuse and overwhelm most users. It was designed to be simple, functional, and focused. “It’s just a web browser” wasn’t a problem, it was progress.

As Samsung releases its successor, the Chromebook 2, things have changed. Cheap laptops can be even thinner, even faster, even more powerful, even longer-lasting; the Chromebook 2 is all four. The opportunity has grown, too: these 11.6-inch and 13.3-inch laptops enter a market in which most of what most people do all day lives inside a web browser anyway. We can do basic word processing and number-crunching with Google Docs or Office Online; we store all our files in Dropbox or OneDrive. Chrome OS feels more native than ever, but in a very real way we’ve caught up to Google’s vision more than it’s caught up to us.

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Top 7 Desktop Environment For Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Standard Linux circulations regularly default to one of two desktop environments, KDE or GNOME. Both of these give clients an instinctive and attractive desktop, and also offering a verity of media inbuilt softwares, system programs, games, utilities, web development tools, programming tools and so on. These two desktops center all the more on giving clients a cutting edge computing environment with all the accessories emphasized in Windows OS, instead of minimizing the measure of system resources they require.

If you are using Ubuntu (or other) and exhausted of utilizing Unity desktop constantly? At that point, you ought to look at different choices accessible that can swap unity for you. I have gathered 7 desktop environments that are great and you beyond any doubt would need to utilize them once you are finished with this article.

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[The founder of Linux Malta] Ramon Casha, chairman of the humanist association, passes away

Tributes are flowing in this evening for Ramon Casha, chairman of the Malta Humanist Society, civil rights campaigner and a frequent commenter on Times of Malta, who has passed away. Michael Briguglio, former chairman of Alternattiva wrote in a Facebook post: Rest in peace Ramon Casha: honest, free-thinking and non-partisan civil society campaigner within Malta Humanist Association and so many causes. Read more

KDE Leftovers

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    We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.2.1. This is a pure bugfix release, and takes care of various important bugs.
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