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Pardus Kurumsal 2

Filed under
Linux

elevenislouder.blogspot: Yesterday, I did something that I always do. I checked DistroWatch for the latest news. Something interesting was listed there. Apparently, Pardus has a "Corporate" edition. This isn't a paid release or anything. It's another version of Pardus that uses only trusted components.

Sneak Peek at Sabayon's New Package Web Interface

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Linux
Software
Web

wolf911.us: Are you a fan of sneak-peeks? Who isn’t right? Fabio has released an insight into what http://www.sabayon.org/packages/ will be transformed into. It’s a work in progress and at about 30% done so far.

Fedora 14 screen captures

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Linux

8thstring.blogspot: Fedora 14 was released last Nov 2, 2010, awfully long time ago in the Linux world. Anyway, I am just documenting here how it looks like installing Fedora 14 in VirtualBox.

Not All is Fair in Linux

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Linux

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: There are a couple experiences I had yesterday computer-wise that I'd like to share. The first has to do with printing. [Then] I got the error message of "Ubuntu is running in low-graphics mode".

Quick Look: PureOS 3.0

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Linux

eyeonlinux.com: Every once in a while I run into a distro that has me scratching my head and wondering what the developers were thinking. PureOS is just such a distribution.

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.38 (Part 2) – File systems

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Linux

h-online.com: Linux 2.6.38 contains patches to improve the scalability of VFS that have been the topic of much discussion for the past six months and that Torvalds himself was waiting for. Ext3 and XFS now support batched discard, which is interesting for SSDs, while Btrfs and SquashFS support additional compression technologies.

London Stock Exchange's Linux move hits trouble

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

thinq.co.uk: Following the first use of the Millennium Exchange in anger earlier this week, a glitch resulted a delay of almost a minute to the end-of-day trading. While that problem has yet to repeat itself, traders are complaining of other issues with the new platform.

Adventures in Linux: an Update

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Linux
Slack

genek.net: I ran Slackware for awhile. Matter of fact, I still am using Slackware for servers. I’m thinking I’ll probably stick with Slackware as my server OS, simply because it trounces absolutely everything in terms of can’t-kill-it stability… even Debian stable.

Nigeria Uses GNU/Linux to Manage Elections

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Linux

mrpogson.com: Nigeria which has struggled over decades to give diverse groups of people a place in their democracy, has found GNU/Linux works for them to keep track of millions of voters.

Review: CrunchBang Linux

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Linux

computerworld.com.au: A lot of modern Linux distributions created with desktop users in mind go out of their way to be user friendly. Ubuntu, Mint, openSUSE, Fedora — and many more. It is a sign of how desktop Linux has matured. The creators of CrunchBang Linux, however, haven't quite gone in the same direction.

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