Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

YaCy Team Celebrates Successful Campaign

Filed under
Linux

YaCy is a Linux OS and software stack designed to de-centralize the Internet by allowing users to build their own peer-to-peer search portals, limiting its potential only by the number of active users connected to the Internet. The technology can also be used for Intranet searches on corporate and school sites. The user only needs to download and install the software stack on a dedicated machine in order to contribute to the network.

Read more ►

MiracleCast: Miracast / WiFi Displays Come To Linux

Filed under
Linux

For months now David Herrmann has been working on a new project known as OpenWFD for open-source WiFi displays on Linux. OpenWFD is an open-source implementation of the WiFi Display Standard / Miracast. That work is now showing success and as part of that Herrmann has just announced Miraclecast as a component to providing open-source Miracast/WFD support on the Linux desktop.

Read more ►

Top 9 Linux Podcasts

Filed under
Linux

Last year I wrote an article called “Linux Podcasts and Magazines” which listed some of the best magazines and podcasts about Linux. Having looked back at that article I am aware that it could have gone a lot further as there are loads of podcasts that could have been named.

Read more ►

Linux-based NVR offers remote mobile access

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Planet unveiled a Linux-based, 16-channel network video recorder called the NVR-1620, with dual HDD bays, dual displays, and up to 2560 x 1920 resolution.

Taiwan-based Planet has a long track record of making networking and surveillance appliances. Its latest NVR-1620 network video recorder supports 16 IP video channels, and up to 16 devices can be networked for 256 total channels accessible via a central monitoring site. In addition, most mobile platforms, including Android, are supported for remote viewing.

Read more ►

Life without a Windows Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Many years ago, I was in the computer repair business. I worked for small businesses, households, and pretty much anyone that would either sign a contract or pay a monthly rate for my technology know-how.

During this period in time, the most common issue I ran into was Windows malware disrupting my client's ability to use their computer(s). After a while of fixing the same old problem, I decided I was ready for a change. During this transitional period, I became more familiar with the various popular Linux distros that were available: Red Hat, Mandrake (Mandriva), and the live Linux CDs that followed a short time later.

Read more ►

Making the case for the non-techie to jump into Linux

Filed under
Linux

Are you an XP user looking for a similar alternative? Is your PC aging but you don't care for the Windows 8 Metro interface?

I suggest you take a look at Linux. Why? Because Linux can serve your basic computing needs well enough that the experience is comparable to your previous operating system of choice.

Read more ►

Raspberry Pi: giant hacks for a tiny board

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Usually there are two ways to look forward to buy a Raspberry Pi: first, think about a strange thing to make, and then go to the website; or second, buy the Raspberry Pi board having no idea of what you are going to do with it. Usually, I buy things and only after that I go through the Internet in search of inspiration and creative use cases for my new toys. That was the case with my first Raspberry Pi board: everyone seems to be able to put together his tiny PC with some parts (monitor, mouse and so on), a CPU and a lightweight Linux distribution, but what can we do that is totally crazy, mind-blowing and problem-solving?

Read more ►

BeagleBone Black: The Sub-$50 ARM Linux Board

Filed under
Linux

The BeagleBone Black has been one of the popular low-cost ARM development boards in recent months for budget-minded hobbyists due to its $45 price-tag, being Linux friendly, and support for powering off a USB cable. While it may be a cheap ARM development board, is its performance too dauntingly slow?

Read more ►

Linux Kernel 3.14 RC3 Released with Updated Drivers and Fixes

Filed under
Linux

Linux kernel 3.14 RC3 includes several updated drivers (GPU, media, block, etc.), architecture updates (x86, ARM64, s390), filesystem improvements (Btrfs, VFS, NFS, OCFS, and kernfs fixes), as well as various mm and tooling (perf) improvements.

Read more ►

IBM Power Development Platform Emphasizes Linux ISVs

Filed under
Linux
Server

Access to Power Systems servers for business partners, primarily independent software providers (ISVs), has been revamped with improved tooling for Linux-oriented ISVs bringing that development arena up to par with what has existed for IBM i and AIX developers for some time. This particular partner program, which is now called the IBM Power Development Platform (PDP), was formerly known as the Virtual Loaner Program. It was established in 2003 to encourage ISV development projects and provide a cloud-based test environment for companies developing and enhancing applications.

Read more ►

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

  • New Images Of Android-Powered BlackBerry Passport Emerge
    The original BlackBerry Passport running BlackBerry OS 10.3 probably isn’t a device that you’d consider using, but how about one with Android 5.0.2 Lollipop? Before the Ontario-based firm officially unveiled the BlackBerry Priv last year, there were reports that its 2014 smartphone is getting an Android update and a video confirming as much even emerged online. While all of that verifies BlackBerry was indeed working on an Android version of Passport, nothing came out of it and the recent release of the Alcatel-made BlackBerry DTEK50 suggests that the Canadian firm is moving away from manufacturing its own phones. Well, that doesn’t mean a few prototypes don’t exist out in the wild and one lucky poster over at CrackBerry forums actually managed to get its hands on it.
  • Android's Nougat Update Isn't Flashy, but Still Pretty Handy
    Nougat, Google's latest update of its Android smartphone software, isn't particularly flashy; you might not even notice what's different about it at first. But it offers a number of practical time-saving features, plus a few that could save money — and perhaps even your life. You'll be able to switch between apps more easily and do more without opening apps at all. New settings also let you block apps from eating up cellular data in the background. Nougat is starting to appear on phones, including new ones expected from Google next week. Some of these features may seem familiar because individual manufacturers such as Samsung and LG have built them on their own. But now they are officially part of Android, which means they should work with a greater range of apps and phones.
  • 5 upcoming Android phones that are worth waiting for
    It’s an interesting time to be an Android acolyte. The iPhone 7 is perhaps the most divisive iPhone ever, thanks to its infuriating decision to remove the headphone jack, causing more people to consider the alternative operating system. However, the Samsung Galaxy Note 7, one of the flagship Android phones, is literally bursting into flames. Seems like a no-win situation. However, while the glut of different Android phones has its drawbacks (fragmentation mostly) the upside is you’re not limited to one questionable piece of hardware if you want a phone powered by that little green robot. So, with Android Nougat out and the holidays closer than you think, here are five upcoming Android phones worth waiting for.
  • Europol warns of Android tap-and-go thefts
    Law authorities have warned they believe criminals are using Android phones to trigger fraudulent tap-and-go payments. The alert comes in Europol's annual Internet Organised Crime Threat Assessment report. Experts had previously said that the rollout of smart wallet systems could raise such a threat. However, the police are unsure exactly how the attacks are being carried out and how common they are. "The possibility of compromising NFC [near field communication] transactions was explored by academia years ago, and it appears that fraudsters have finally made progress in the area," the report says.
  • [Finally] Google Play Music now appears to be available in India
  • Shazam adds "Auto Shazam" custom tile for Android 7.0 Nougat's Quick Settings
  • When will my phone get Android N? Android Nougat new features: Android N is more productive, more secure and more battery-friendly, but when will you get it?
  • How to create a secure and hidden folder on your Android phone

Kubuntu 16.10 Finally Gets a Public Release, Beta 2 Uses KDE Plasma 5.7 Desktop

Earlier today, September 28, 2016, Canonical announced the release of Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Final Beta, which is also the Beta 2 snapshot for some of the opt-in flavors, including Kubuntu. Read more

Black Panther OS Is No Cool Cat

Installation requires at least 10 GB of hard drive space and 1.5 GB memory. Normally, those requirements are not an issue. It becomes one, however, when installing to a virtual machine. Avoid two annoyances with installing Black Panther OS. The cancel/next buttons on the bottom of the screen did not show until I narrowed the height of the panel bar. Read more

Tiny, open, $18 quad-core SBC has WiFi, BT, eMMC, microSD

FriendlyARM’s 40 x 40mm “NanoPi Neo Air” hacker SBC runs Ubuntu Core on an Allwinner H3 with 8GB eMMC, WiFi, BT, a DVP cam connector, and a microSD slot. The NanoPi Neo Air is a respin of the astonishingly affordable, $8 NanoPi Neo that shipped in July, and has the same 40 x 40mm dimensions as the Neo, making the two boards the smallest quad-core SBCs around. The Neo Air adds WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0, 8GB eMMC, and a DVP camera connector while sacrificing the Ethernet and USB host ports. It debuts at $18, but will eventually move to $20. Read more