Linux

Kernel or distros

Desktop Linux in Government

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Linux

This research report by a third-year graduate student examines the growing use of desktop Linux among governments in the U.S. and globally. Drawing on published research and comments from industry analysts, the author hypothesizes that desktop Linux may be nearing a tipping point within government settings, after which adoption can be expected to accelerate.

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Linux desktop standard ropes in industry heavyweights

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Linux

An initiative to create a standardised Linux desktop, with the support of the major vendors, has brought user friendly open source PCs one step closer to reality.

Also: KDE's core library - Qt - included in new LSB desktop standard

The benefits of ubiquitous Linux

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Linux

Linux continues to make highly visible inroads into IT infrastructure, with IDC reporting 14 consecutive quarters of double-digit growth in Linux server shipments through the third quarter of last year. Less visible to both IT professionals and casual observers alike is the equally impressive penetration of Linux in a wide range of client devices, from routers to firewalls, from private branch exchanges to voice-over-IP phones, from printers to imaging devices and from thin clients to smart mobile phones.

Freespire: A Linux Distro For When You Couldn't Care Less About Freedom

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Linux

Here's something nauseating. Linspire has announced at the 4th Annual Desktop Linux Summit their latest "We'd like to make money from the community's free stuff without honoring community values" strategy. They hope you'll help them compromise by contributing to Freespire, which the article describes as a "community-driven distro" that includes proprietary software. Um...what community is that?

Linux on Desktop Warming Up

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Linux

Linux on the desktop is still mostly a pipe dream because few large organizations are ready to make the switch, but that didn't seem to dampen the enthusiasm of proponents at the LinuxWorld conference in Boston two weeks ago.

Rebuttal to Rob Enderle's Why Linux May Never Be a True Desktop OS

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Linux

Yesterday TechNewsWorld published an opinion piece authored by Rob Enderle where he opines, “Why Linux May Never Be a True Desktop OS”. This is a rebuttal to that article.

Linux supporters deliver desktop standards

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Linux

The Free Standards Group is due to launch version 3.1 of its Linux Standards Base, delivering the first fruits of its LSB Desktop Project to create new standards for Linux on the desktop.

Mind Map of Linux distributions - Version 2

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Linux

A few days back, I had posted a mind map of Linux distributions on this blog. And I received a flood of suggestions, criticisms and ideas. I have included (almost) all the ideas and suggestions.

Stable kernels 2.6.16.10 and .11

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Linux

So far today there have been only two stable kernel releases. The announcement for 2.6.16.10 appears to have been swallowed by the net, although it contains a fairly large number of fixes (22 in the version posted for review) spread throughout the kernel. 2.6.16.11, instead, goes back to the "single security fix" mode.

Linspire Announces Freespire Distribution

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Linux

Is the world ready for another community Linux distro?

That's the question being asked and answered today at the 4th Annual Desktop Linux Summit. Once known as a community-supported alternative to the Linspire distribution, the Freespire name is about to rise again from the ashes of obscurity--only this time as a distro completely sponsored and endorsed by Linspire itself.

Linspire goes free, bundles proprietary goodies

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Linux

Linspire CEO Kevin Carmony unveiled Freespire, a no-cost version of Linspire's Linux distribution, in his keynote address at the Desktop Linux Summit on April 24th. Freespire will be offered in both a completely open-source version as well as one that includes proprietary software, Carmony said.

"Virtual clients" run Linux

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Linux

ClearCube is shipping a Linux-based "virtual client" that offers secure remote access to a dedicated blade server running Windows XP. The I/Port I8020 client has more inherent security than a laptop, and provides the "full power" of a Pentium 4 from anywhere in the world, according to the company. It targets medical and defense applications.

Why Linux May Never Be a True Desktop OS

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Linux

With Linux, the customer often expects to get the product for free and wants the retail price of Windows deducted from his/her purchase price. There are no funds passed back to the vendor and, because Linux is different, customers tend to place more service calls -- at $85 a call. As a result, the vendor generally ends up losing money.

Ethernet Bonding Configuration in Debian

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Linux
Ubuntu

Ethernet bonding refers to aggregating multiple ethernet channels together to form a single channel. This is primarily used for redundancy in ethernet paths or for load balancing. This page refers in particular to performing ethernet bonding under linux, and so does not limit itself to discussion of 802.3ad Trunk Aggregation.

Read Full article here

Red Hat CEO Suggests Oracle is Feeling the Pressure

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Linux

The previously rosy relationship between Oracle Corp and Red Hat Inc appears to have soured following Red Hat's acquisition of JBoss Inc and Oracle CEO Larry Ellison's suggestion that his company could move into the Linux business.

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My Computer", Isn't "The Computer", Anymore!

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Linux

Early on, in my trek into GNU/Linux, protecting non-technical users from the Linux file system tree, and simplifying their ability to find and access their network, disks, drives, and documents was of primary concern. So too, was increasing their perception of knowing where they are at all times. A simplified method of achieving these goals on all Linux based systems is suggested in this article.

Redemption

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Linux

I don't exactly remember when I first heard about Linux. Might have been around '95 or something like that, maybe '96. One day I found some Linux-distro (I think some early Red Hat) in a local bookstore. I tried a few times, but failed. So, for a while, I didn't care a lot about that "new" free system. "Anyway, what can I do with it?" I thought.

Chinese $150 Linux mini-PC races OLPC to market

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Linux

A Chinese company is touting an inexpensive Linux-based computer as a way to close the "digital divide." YellowSheepRiver's $150 "Municator" appears to be available now, with a three-month leadtime, suggesting it could reach market well ahead of MIT's $100 "One Laptop Per Child" (OLPC) device.

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