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Linux

Good Karma

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

If you are doing it yourself or if you hire someone, you might still need to know how to install GNU/Linux. There are literally hundreds of sources of GNU/Linux. I’ve been using GNU/Linux for many years and only dealt with a few of them. You can hunt for a distribution of GNU/Linux at Distrowatch. You can get the software by downloading an image file of a CD and burning a CD, buying a CD or receiving a copy from a friend, or getting files to put on a USB drive… or… That’s why geeks are useful.

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Linux Foundation Initiatives

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • OpenDaylight Helium gets out of the gate

    OpenDaylight is an open source SDN controller. In its short lifetime, OpenDaylight has gained support from a diverse set of companies and individuals who are eager to see an open source controller serve the networking needs of traditional IT, cloud infrastructure platforms, traditional virtualization management, and fleets of containers. Cisco released the initial code in 2013 and the project now includes 41 paying members.

  • OPNFV Project Begins Planning Open Source NFV Solutions

    The Open Platform for Network Functions Virtualization (OPNFV), the collaborative partnership for advancing open source software-defined networking and data centers that the Linux Foundation announced last month, is now officially live. Here's what it's up to so far, and what it hopes to becomes over the coming months and years.

LLVMLinux Works To Make More Code Clang-Compatible With Linux 3.18

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Linux

On top of some separate patches to make the mainline 64-bit ARM Linux kernel closer to building under Clang, a separate pull request was sent in for the Linux 3.18 kernel that works to make other areas of the kernel's massive code-base more compatible with the LLVM/Clang compiler.

The LLVMLinux project remains dedicated to making the Linux kernel compatible with LLVM's Clang as an alternative to using GCC. Using this alternative compiler can yield faster build times, lower memory usage, static analysis capabilities, and for making the kernel's code more portable across compilers. Read more in my recent Building The Linux Kernel With LLVM's Clang Yields Comparable Performance article.

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Cumulus Linux 2.5: A Cisco-killer in the data center

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Linux

Cumulus Linux 2.5, designed for white-box data center hardware, helps Hadoop, VMware, and OpenStack users ramp up their networking

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Linux Mint 17 Now Lets Users Bookmark Folders in a Different Sidebar Section

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Linux

The ability to bookmark drives or other locations in the file manager should be something standard. Surprisingly, it's not a feature that's present everywhere and it lacks flexibility. Let's take the example of Ubuntu, which is used as the base of Linux Mint. Users can make bookmarks, even if it's a Samba directory, but they can't move them. This can be annoying, if you really want the power to change everything you want.

Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu, but it doesn't use the same file manager. In Ubuntu it's Nautilus (Files) from the GNOME project, but on Linux Mint it's Nemo. The two are very different and they provide various options for their users.

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Rolling-release testing

Filed under
GNU
Linux

At the time of writing each operating system in my trial has been up and running for a few days. About once a week I will update each system and take note of what does or does not work. At the moment I plan to focus on whether each system is still able to boot after an update, whether I will be able to login to a graphical desktop and browse the web using Firefox and edit documents using LibreOffice. I am open to suggestions as to other tests readers may want me to perform. During this trial I will be posting observations on events as they happen on my Twitter feed as regular updates seem appropriate for a trial involving rolling-release distributions. I will also post updates on the experience here on weeks when something of significance happens.

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3.8 Million Raspberry Pi Linux Computers Sold - Oh My!

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Linux

I own three Raspberry Pi's (two B's and one B+) and many people I know also own one or more Pis. All those Pi add up and now the Raspberry Pi Foundation says that it has sold 3.8 million units.

That's a whole lot of Pi.

The Raspberry Pi was never supposed to be a massive volume seller. It was supposed to be a teaching and educational tool to help get kids (and adults) interested in development and maker culture.

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Now, Zen Mobile to launch low cost Firefox smartphone in October

Filed under
Linux
Moz/FF

Just few weeks into the unveiling of the first Firefox OS device in the the Indian market, Mozilla announced further partnerships with popular mobile device brands and app partners in India to launch new smartphones and content services.

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CAINE Linux Distribution Helps Investigators With Forensic Analysis

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Linux

There is no shortage of Linux distributions to serve specific markets and use cases. In the security market, a number of Linux distributions are widely used, including Kali Linux, which is popular with security penetration testers. There's also CAINE Linux, which is focused on another area of security. CAINE, an acronym for Computer Aided INvestigative Environment, is a Linux distribution for forensic investigators. Instead of penetration testing tools, CAINE is loaded with applications and tools to help investigators find the clues and data points that are required for computer security forensics. Among the tools included in CAINE are memory, database and network analysis applications. CAINE is built on top of the Ubuntu Linux 14.04 distribution that was released in April. Rather than use the Ubuntu Unity desktop environment, CAINE uses the MATE desktop. The CAINE 6.0 "Dark Matter" operating system was first released on Oct. 7 and includes new and updated applications to help forensics investigators. CAINE can be run as a live image from a CD or USB memory stick and can also be installed onto a user's hard drive. In this slide show, eWEEK examines some of the key features of CAINE 6.

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Machine vision COM and cameras go Linux

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Linux

Vision Components has launched two Linux-based, smart machine vision cameras and a COM built around a Xilinx Zynq SoC, each supporting up to 4.2MP video.

Over the last decade, smart cameras for machine vision have been transitioning from DSPs to systems that combine DSPs or FPGAs with ARM or x86 processors running Linux. The latest to join the Linux camp is Ettlingen, Germany based machine vision manufacturer Vision Components, which with its latest “VC Z” cameras has switched from a DSP-based system to a tuxified ARM/FPGA combo. Thanks to the Xilinx Zynq, the company was able to accomplish this with a single system-on-chip. The VC Z is available in a VCSBC nano Z computer-on-module, which also appears to act as the foundation for the new VC nano Z and VC pro Z cameras.

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OSS Leftovers

  • Nextcloud 12 Officially Released, Adds New Architecture for Massive Scalability
    Nextcloud informs Softpedia today about the official availability of the final release of Nextcloud 12, a major milestone of the self-hosting cloud server technology that introduces numerous new features and improvements. The biggest new feature of the Nextcloud 12 release appears to be the introduction of a new architecture for massive scalability, called Global Scale, which is a next-generation open-source technology for syncing and sharing files. Global Scale increases scalability from tens of thousands of users to hundreds of millions on a single instance, while helping universities and other institutions significantly reduce the costs of their existing large installations.
  • ReactOS 0.4.5 Open-Source Windows-Compatible OS Launches with Many Improvements
    ReactOS 0.4.5 is a maintenance update that adds numerous changes and improvements over the previous point release. The kernel has been updated in this version to improve the FreeLoader and UEFI booting, as well as the Plug and Play modules, adding support for more computers to boot ReactOS without issues.
  • Sprint Debuts Open Source NFV/SDN Platform Developed with Intel Labs
    AT&T has been the headliner in the carrier race to software defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV). But Sprint is putting its own stamp on the space this week with its debut of a new open source SDN/NFV mobile core solution.
  • Google’s New Home for All Things Open Source Runs Deep
    Google is not only one of the biggest contributors to the open source community but also has a strong track record of delivering open source tools and platforms that give birth to robust technology ecosystems. Just witness the momentum that Android and Kubernetes now have. Recently, Google launched a new home for its open source projects, processes, and initiatives. The site runs deep and has several avenues worth investigating. Here is a tour and some highlights worth noting.
  • Making your first open source contribution
  • Simplify expense reports with Smart Receipts
    The app is called Smart Receipts, it's licensed AGPL 3.0, and the source code is available on GitHub for Android and iOS.
  • How the TensorFlow team handles open source support
    Open-sourcing is more than throwing code over the wall and hoping somebody uses it. I knew this in theory, but being part of the TensorFlow team at Google has opened my eyes to how many different elements you need to build a community around a piece of software.
  • IRC for the 21st Century: Introducing Riot
    Internet relay chat (IRC) is one of the oldest chat protocols around and still popular in many open source communities. IRC's best strengths are as a decentralized and open communication method, making it easy for anyone to participate by running a network of their own. There are also a variety of clients and bots available for IRC.

Tizen News: Phones and TVs

  • Tizen 3.0-powered Samsung Z4 now available with offline retailers in india
    The Samsung Z4, the fourth smartphone in Samsung’s Z series and a successor to the Z2 (and not the Z3, as many would assume), has been formally announced and made an appearance at the Tizen Developer Conference (TDC 2017) this past week. The Z4 was rumoured to make its way to India on May 19th (Friday) and it did – arriving with offline retailers after launching in the country last Monday (one week ago).
  • Samsung 2017 QLED TVs World First to support autocalibration for HDR
  • Samsung approves You.i TV video platform for Tizen TV app development
    While Samsung has developed Tizen TV apps using JavaScript, You.i TV’s Engine Video app runs on Native Client (NACL), a web technology that does not only allows C++ applications to run in a standard browser but is said to be 24 times faster than JavaScript. Now that Samsung has approved You.i TV’s video engine platform, developers can craft more video content for Tizen Smart TV owners.
  • Samsung Smart TV gets a new Glympse app that enables location sharing on the TV
    Samsung Smart TV, powered by the intuitive, self-developed Tizen operating system, has gotten a cool new app which enables consumers to view the location of their friends, loved ones or even a pizza delivery or cable technician in real-time directly from their home’s largest screen. The new app is developed by Glympse, the leading real-time location services platform.

How To Encrypt DNS Traffic In Linux Using DNSCrypt

​Dnscrypt is a protocol that is used to improve DNS security by authenticating communications between a DNS client and a DNS resolver. DNSCrypt prevents DNS spoofing. It uses cryptographic signatures to verify that responses originate from the chosen DNS resolver and haven’t been tampered with. DNSCrypt is available for multi-platforms including Windows, MacOS, Unix, Android, iOS, Linux and even routers. Read
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Debian-Based Untangle 13.0 Linux Firewall Tackles Bufferbloat, Adds New Features

Untangle NG Firewall, the open-source and powerful Debian-based network security platform featuring pluggable modules for network apps, has been updated to version 13.0, a major release adding new features and numerous improvements. The biggest improvement brought by the Untangle NG Firewall 13.0 release is to the poor latency generated by excess buffering in networking equipment, called bufferbloat, by supporting a queueing algorithm designed to optimize QoS and bandwidth to enforce a controlled delay. Read more