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XPS with Ubuntu 14.04

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GNU
Linux

Top 6 Ways To Get Your iTunes Experience On Linux

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GNU
Linux
Software

As you’re getting used to Linux (potentially as your new main operating system), you’ll eventually try to find a way to efficiently manage your music. iTunes comes to mind because it’s been the most popular way to manage music over the years, but you’ll quickly find out that iTunes isn’t available natively on Linux. Plus, better ways exist to manage your music now that it’s 2015.

However, that doesn’t automatically mean that you won’t be able to manage your music the way you want to. There’s plenty of other ways to keep tabs on your music library. Here’s six great ways to get it done.

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Also: Ambient Noise Player for Ubuntu Plays Relaxing Sounds to Keep You Creative

Linux-ready smart camera SoC encodes 1080p@70fps video

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Linux

Allwinner unveiled a Cortex-A7 based SoC for smart connected cameras that integrates its HawkView image signal processor, and supports Linux and “Camdroid.”

Allwinner jumped on the ARM Cortex-A7 spec early, using it for its popular, low-priced system-on-chips like the Allwinner A10, dual-core A20, and quad-core A31. Like the A10, Allwinner’s new “V3″ SoC has a single Cortex-A7 core, in this case clocked to 1.2GHz. However, Like a number of TI’s Linux-focused, DSP-based DaVinci SoCs, the V3 is designed for camera applications. It follows Allwinner V-Series SoCs including the quad-core, Cortex-A7 V10 and Cortex-A8-based V15.

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diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

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Development
Linux

Recently there was some discussion about ways to ease the tired backs of kernel maintainers. Apparently the merge windows are times of great labor, and some folks wanted to alert contributors to some preferable code submission habits.

There were a variety of ideas, and Kevin Cernekee summarized them in patch form, but one key idea was that none of this advice really could be treated as etched into stone. Linus Torvalds and Theodore Ts'o, in particular, pointed out that maintainers all have their own ways of doing things, and that no general rules could be relied on universally to produce repeatable results.

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Also: Linux 4.0 Kernel Will Likely Be Released Next Weekend

Linux 4.0 rc7

Linux 4.0-rc7 Kernel Released

Growing The Linux Talent Pool - 50% Off LFCE Exams

Linus Torvalds explains why he created Git

Git This: World's Favorite Software Development Tool Turns 10

MintBox Mini PC Powered by Linux Mint Finally Released, Already Sold Out

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Linux

MintBox Mini is a mini-PC designed and built by CompuLab. The new system was just made available and the first batch is already sold out.

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Compact Cortex-A9 SBC expands on its inner Udoo

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Android
Linux

Seco has released a commercial SBC spun from the original i.MX6-based open spec Udoo hacker SBC, adding eMMC flash and subtracting Arduino compatibility.

Seco oversees the popular, community-backed Udoo SBC project, but also sells more commercial single board computers under its own name, such as the SECOpITX-GX. While that board was equipped with an AMD G-Series SoC and adopted the 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX form factor, Seco’s new “SECOSBC-A62″ SBC features a Freescale i.MX6 SoC, and uses a 110 x 86.5mm form factor borrowed from the original Udoo SBC on which it’s based.

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1+ Year Running Arch Linux on a Lenovo Yoga 2

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GNU
Linux

Other than the hardware-specific issues, I’ve been amazed by how well Arch Linux works, given that it doesn’t have release cycles, or a big team with a lot of money supporting and marketing it. I’ve heard only 30 developers maintain the core Arch packages, with most of them having a full-time job doing something else! At the same time, it shouldn’t be a total surprise things work so well because free software doesn’t just fall off a turnip truck:

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CRUX Distribution Powered by Linux Kernel 3.19.2

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Linux
OSS

David Cortarello announced on April 6 that the second maintenance release of Kwort Linux 4.0, an open source distribution based on the CRUX operating system and designed to be robust, extendable, and clean, is now available for download.

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ZaReason Zini 1550 is a Linux mini desktop PC with Intel Broadwell

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Linux

Linux PC retailer ZaReason has released one of its first computers with an Intel Broadwell processor. The ZaReason Zini 1550 is a tiny desktop computer which sells for $549 and up.

It’s based on Intel’s NUC mini PC platform, but unlike some NUC systems, the Zini 1550 comes with memory, storage, and an operating system which means you should be able to start using the computer almost as soon as you plug it in.

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Linux Kernel 4.0 Delayed by a Week, Release Candidate 7 Now Available for Download

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Linux

Linus Torvalds had the pleasure of announcing today, April 6, the immediate availability for download and testing of the seventh and last RC (Release Candidate) version of upcoming Linux 4.0 kernel, as well as the fact that the final version of Linux kernel 4.0 will be unveiled in two weeks from today, around April 19, 2015.

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More in Tux Machines

An introduction to Joplin, an open source Evernote alternative

Joplin is an open source cross-platform note-taking and to-do application. It can handle a large number of notes, organized into notebooks, and can synchronize them across multiple devices. The notes can be edited in Markdown, either from within the app or with your own text editor, and each application has an option to render Markdown with formatting, images, URLs, and more. Any number of files, such as images and PDFs, can be attached to a note, and notes can also be tagged. I started developing Joplin when Evernote changed its pricing model and because I wanted my 4,000+ notes to be stored in a more open format, free of any proprietary solution. To that end, I have developed three Joplin applications, all under the MIT License: for desktop (Windows, MacOS, and Linux), for mobile (Android and iOS), and for the terminal (Windows, MacOS, and Linux). All the applications have similar user interfaces and can synchronize with each other. They are based on open standards and technologies including SQLite and JavaScript for the backend, and Terminal Kit (Node.js), Electron, and React Native for the three front ends. Read more

Open Source OS Still supporting 32-bit Architecture and Why it’s Important

One after the other, Linux distributions are dropping 32-bit support. Or, to be accurate, they drop support for the Intel x86 32-bit architecture (IA-32). Indeed, computers based on x86_64 hardware (IA-64) are superior in every way to their 32-bits counterpart: they are more powerful, run faster, are more compact, and more energy efficient. Not mentioning their price has considerably decreased in just a few years. If you have the opportunity to switch to 64 bits, do it. But, to quote a mail I received recently from Peter Tribble, author of Tribblix: “[… ] in the developed world we assume that we can replace things; in some parts of the developing world older IA-32 systems are still the norm, with 64-bit being rare.” Read more

KDE Applications 17.12 Lands with Dolphin Enhancements, HiDPI Support for Okular

KDE Applications 17.12 has been in development for the past several months and it's now available as a drop-in replacement for the previous series of the software suite, KDE Applications 17.08, which reached end of life in early November. As expected, several of the included apps received various enhancements and new features in this release. Among these, we can mention that the Dolphin file manager is now capable of saving searches, can limit the search only to folders, makes renaming of files easier by allowing the user to simply double-click on the file name, displays extra information about files like origin URL of downloaded file or modification date, and introduces new Bitrate, Genre, and Release Year columns. Read more Also: KDE Applications 17.12 Brings HiDPI Improvements, Rest Of KDE Games Ported To KF5 KDE Ships KDE Applications 17.12.0

Stable kernels 4.14.6 and 4.9.69

Two new stable kernels have been released by Greg Kroah-Hartman: 4.14.6 and 4.9.69. As usual, they contain fixes all over the kernel tree; users of those series should upgrade. Read more See: Linux 4.14.6 and Linux 4.9.69