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Linux

Plasma Team Gathers in Barcelona

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Linux

In the second week of January, KDE's Plasma team gathered in the Blue Systems office in Barcelona, Spain, to discuss and work on the next generation of KDE's popular workspace products. The meeting comes just at the right time, as the Plasma team has just finished a first technology preview, which puts the base technology in place and allows for an evaluation of the current progress. It also gives an opportunity for more refined plans for a first stable release.

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rbash – A Restricted Bash Shell Explained with Practical Examples

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Linux
HowTos

Linux Shell is one of the most fascinating and powerful GNU/Linux powered tool. All the application, including X, is built over shell and Linux shell is so powerful that the whole Linux system can be controlled precisely, using it. The other aspect of Linux shell is that, it can be potentially harmful, when you executed a system command, without knowing its consequence or unknowingly.

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Fedora.next in 2014 -- Big Picture and Themes

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OS
Linux

The main reason for that: Fedora.next is a huge effort that seems to make everything even more complicated. It imho is also sold pretty badly right now, as you have to invest quite a lot of time to understand what Fedora.next actually is. And Fedora.next to me seems like something the core contributors push forward without having really abort those Fedora contributors who don't have Fedora as one of their top priorities in life.

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UberWriter, a beautiful Markdown editor

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Linux

lf is correct — I did find him via UberWriter, a beautiful Markdown editor. There are lots of Linux tools that work well and there are lots of Linux tools that look great, but there’s not always a lot of overlap between the two. UberWriter looks great and works great. Wolf uses Synapse, an application launcher, within GNOME, which has some built-in launcher functionality, but that lacks the depth and finesse Synapse offers. Wolf’s other ideas for how to enhance GNOME are very interesting, too.

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SimpleDRM Driver Gets A Major Rewrite

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Linux

SimpleDRM is aiming to be a rather generic and simple DRM driver for the mainline Linux kernel. SimpleDRM doesn't do hardware acceleration but can replace multiple existing frame-buffer drivers like efifb, vesafb, simplefb, and other code. This basic DRM driver can then work with the xf86-video-modesetting X.Org driver but there isn't yet any support for using this DRM driver on Wayland-based systems.

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Sword Of The Stars: The Pit & Ground Pounders Soon To Arrive On Linux

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Linux
Gaming

We are currently approaching completion of porting The Pit to Linux (as well as Mac and mobile pads.) Ground Pounders is also nearing completion. It's was designed with multiplatform multiplay in mind, so it will go out the door with Linux hot on its heels, whereas The Pit started with enough manpower for one SKU and we opted for PC. Then over the last few months, we worked on expanding it as well as working towards the ports as things progressed. It's gone a bit longer than we'd hoped, but we'll be done pretty soon. The Pit is coming to Linux!

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3 Reasons Why Ubuntu Smartphone Will Succeed

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Linux
Ubuntu

This year we should see the first Ubuntu smartphone launched with demo devices most likely being on display at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. As far as we know, China’s Meizu may be just one of the launch partners with more OEMs likely to join the party in no time at all. Here we want to explain why we think Ubuntu smartphone(s) will change the game for good.

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Raspberry Pi: Extending the life of the SD card

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Linux
Hardware

SD cards are said to have a finite life. If you are planning on running a Raspberry Pi 24x7x365, there are some steps that you can take with GNU/Linux to extend the life of the card: here are some ideas.

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Kali Linux 1.0.6, hands-on

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Linux

Exploring this Debian GNU/Linux derivative that is tightly focused on security analysis and penetration testing - and it comes with a mind-boggling array of utilities for that purpose.

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Rifles powered by Linux purchased by US Army

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Linux

TweakTown is reporting that the US Army has purchased Linux-powered rifles from TrackingPoint.

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More in Tux Machines

How Google Does Open Source

Marc Merlin has been working as an engineer at Google since 2002 and has seen (and done) a lot of open source and Linux work during that time. Speaking at the LinuxCon North America event this week, Merlin provided a standing room only audience with an overview how Google uses and contributes to open source. "Google wouldn't be around today without open source software," Merlin said. Read more

High-end music player has a Raspberry Pi running Raspbian inside

Bryston has launched a high-end, compact “BDP-π” digital music player built on a Raspberry Pi running Raspbian, plus a HifiBerry “Digi+” audio HAT add-on. Bryston’s new Raspberry Pi-based BDP-π digital music player costs a hefty $1,295. Yet that’s less than half the cost of the highly acclaimed Bryston BDP-2 player, while offering many of these same features and much of the same high-end sound quality. The BDP-π is faster and more capable than the BDP-1, says the company. Read more

Leftovers: Gaming (Mighty No. 9 and Wine)

  • “Mighty No. 9” Mac & Linux Versions Released on Steam
    The creators of the Kickstarter-funded video game, Mighty No. 9, announced on Thursday they released the Mac and Linux versions of the game. This announcement comes just a little over two months after the game was delivered to North American and Asian backers via PS4, Xbox One, and PC. The team revealed that both Mac and Linux versions are now available on Steam.
  • Mac and Linux Versions of Mighty No. 9 Released
  • The Wine Stable Release 1.8.4 Is Now Available
    The Wine team released today fifth stable release of 1.8 branch of Wine. Version 1.8.4 has many small changes including 50 bugfixes. This stable release contains bugfixes, new cards were added to GPU description table, new features are included in development releases from 1.9 branch.

Android Leftovers

  • iPhones are much more likely to 'fail' than Androids
    Apple's once glittering reputation for quality took quite a few hits during the last few years, especially when it comes to iOS, the software that runs on iPhones. In some cases, recurrent software bugs have plagued users with issues such as the inability to use Wi-Fi, frequent crashes, and ridiculously short battery life. This week reports surfaced about a hardware flaw that makes some iPhone 6 screens inoperable. (Apple hasn't confirmed any related problems.) It's hard to tell how widespread some of these issues are, but a new report from a company that monitors smartphone quality suggests iPhones are far more likely to "fail" or suffer serious glitches than Android phones. The Blancco Technology Group says it collected performance data from millions of mobile phones during the second quarter of 2016, and it found that iPhones had an overall failure rate of 58 percent, compared to just 35 percent failure for Android devices. The term "failure" doesn’t necessarily mean that the phone has become a brick, according to Blancco. Instead, it means the device or software running on the device suffered some serious problem.
  • Maru OS is now open source (Turns Android phones into Linux desktops)
    Maru OS is a software project that lets you plug an Android phone into an external display to run desktop Linux software. First unveiled earlier this year, the software is very much a work-in-progress. Initially it only supported one phone: the Google Nexus 5. But things could get a lot more interesting soon, because the developer behind Maru OS has finished open sourcing the project and a group of developers are planning to start porting the software to run on additional devices.
  • Maru OS wants to turn your phone into a desktop with its latest open source build
    Not to be confused with Maru the adorable YouTube cat, Maru OS, the bite-sized Android add-on that turns your phone into a desktop, just went open source. Maru OS doesn’t change much about the way your phone operates on its own, but once you connect a desktop monitor via a slimport cable, Maru really comes to life. When connected to a display, Maru OS allows you to run a desktop Linux environment straight from your phone. Your phone is still a phone, it’ll take calls, send texts and do everything else it normally does, even while it’s connected to a desktop monitor running Linux on the side. It’s an interesting concept, but it’s still very much a work in progress. Today’s announcement could help move things along for Maru.