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SalentOS 14.04.2 released!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

With pleasure SalentOS Team announces the release of SalentOS 14.04.2.

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Jolla Communicator for Ubuntu Helps Users Control Their Jolla Smartphones

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OS
Linux

The Jolla community has put together an application called Jolla Communicator that allows users to send and receive messages on Ubuntu, which connected to a Sailfish OS-powered smartphone.

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Material Design Inspired Papyros Still Alive, Looks Gorgeous

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Linux

Papyros is a new Linux distribution designed around a Material Design framework, and it promises to be one of the most interesting releases in the Linux ecosystem. After a month that brought no news about its progress, the devs explained that the project is not dead, but alive and kicking.

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Linux Mint 17.2 to Be Named "Rafaela"

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Linux

The name of the next Linux Mint 17.2 release has been chosen and it's going to be "Rafaela." The project continues with the feminine names, so the new code name should be no surprise.

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Enlightenment EFL 1.14.0 Alpha 1

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GNU
Linux

The Enlightenment crew at Samsung have released their first alpha version of the upcoming EFL 1.14.0 library set.

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Looking into the Void distribution

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

Void is an independent distribution and offers a rolling release approach to package management. There are many Void editions we can download. There are Void images for the BeagleBone and Raspberry Pi computers along with builds for 32-bit and 64-bit x86 machines. In addition, there are spins of Void for specific desktop environments and we can download images for Cinnamon, Enlightenment, MATE and Xfce flavours. I decided to begin my trial with the 64-bit Cinnamon build of Void. The download for the Cinnamon image is 454MB in size.

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Top 5 Linux First Person Shooter Games Play On Steam

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Linux
Reviews
Gaming


top 5 Linux First person shooter games

Among many Games categories 'First Person Shooter' FPS for short has been choice of majority of gamers. If you were using Windows in past then you would've heard of FPS games Halo, Titalfall, Call Of Duty, Blackshot and many more. But.. Do we have such exciting First Person Shooter games for Linux. Well, there are many. Here I am going to list Top 5 Linux First Person Shooter games. Check them out and have fun on Linux.

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

The Linux Setup - Carla Schroder, OwnCloud/Writer

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

I adore Linux because I can do what I want on it. My first PC way back in 1994ish was an Apple something. It was fun, and then I got an IBM PC running Windows 3,1 and DOS 5. Windows was useless, so I spent a lot of time in DOS. Then I learned about Linux and never looked back. And Windows is still useless, and Apple is too confining. They both have their little walled gardens, and their primary purpose is lock-in and to keep selling you junk whether you want it or not, and whether or not it’s any good. They think they retain ownership of your stuff that you have purchased, which is a concept that needs to die.

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Scientific Linux 7.1 to Be Unveiled on April 13, Release Candidate 2 Out Now

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Linux

Pat Riehecky from the Scientific Linux development team has announced today, April 7, the immediate availability for download and testing of the second and last Release Candidate (RC) version of the forthcoming Scientific Linux 7.1 operating system.

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SMARC module runs Linux on i.MX6, runs hot and cold

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Linux

Embedian has launched a SMARC COM that runs Linux on a Freescale i.MX6, and offers up to 2GB RAM, 4GB eMMC, -40 to 85°C operation, and a Mini-ITX baseboard.

Embedian’s SMARC (Smart Mobility ARChitecture) form-factor SMARC-FiMX6 computer-on-module follows Embedian’s earlier SMARC-T335X, which integrates a TI AM335x Sitara system-on-chip. The SMARC-T335X module also formed the basis for a pair of Embedian sandwich-style Smart SBCs. The similarly SODIMM-style SMARC-FiMX6 instead showcases Freescale’s Cortex-A9-based i.MX6 SoC.

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Android Leftovers

FreeBSD-Based TrueOS 17.12 Released

The FreeBSD-based operating system TrueOS that's formerly known as PC-BSD has put out their last stable update of 2017. TrueOS 17.12 is now available as the latest six-month stable update for this desktop-focused FreeBSD distribution that also offers a server flavor. TrueOS continues using OpenRC as its init system and this cycle they have continued improving their Qt5-based Lumina desktop environment, the Bhyve hypervisor is now supported in the TrueOS server install, improved removable device support, and more. Read more

An introduction to Joplin, an open source Evernote alternative

Joplin is an open source cross-platform note-taking and to-do application. It can handle a large number of notes, organized into notebooks, and can synchronize them across multiple devices. The notes can be edited in Markdown, either from within the app or with your own text editor, and each application has an option to render Markdown with formatting, images, URLs, and more. Any number of files, such as images and PDFs, can be attached to a note, and notes can also be tagged. I started developing Joplin when Evernote changed its pricing model and because I wanted my 4,000+ notes to be stored in a more open format, free of any proprietary solution. To that end, I have developed three Joplin applications, all under the MIT License: for desktop (Windows, MacOS, and Linux), for mobile (Android and iOS), and for the terminal (Windows, MacOS, and Linux). All the applications have similar user interfaces and can synchronize with each other. They are based on open standards and technologies including SQLite and JavaScript for the backend, and Terminal Kit (Node.js), Electron, and React Native for the three front ends. Read more

Open Source OS Still supporting 32-bit Architecture and Why it’s Important

One after the other, Linux distributions are dropping 32-bit support. Or, to be accurate, they drop support for the Intel x86 32-bit architecture (IA-32). Indeed, computers based on x86_64 hardware (IA-64) are superior in every way to their 32-bits counterpart: they are more powerful, run faster, are more compact, and more energy efficient. Not mentioning their price has considerably decreased in just a few years. If you have the opportunity to switch to 64 bits, do it. But, to quote a mail I received recently from Peter Tribble, author of Tribblix: “[… ] in the developed world we assume that we can replace things; in some parts of the developing world older IA-32 systems are still the norm, with 64-bit being rare.” Read more