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Debian Project at several conferences and trade fairs

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Linux

debian.org: The Debian Project is pleased to announce that it will be present at several events in the coming weeks, ranging from developer oriented conferences to user oriented trade fairs. As usual, upcoming events are also listed on our website.

Red Hat Mogul Sued for $30 Million

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Linux
  • Red Hat Mogul Sued for $30 Million
  • Red Hat Pops On Upgrade
  • sellers abandoning shares of red hat on 1.2x above-average volume
  • TBJ poll: Red Hat should move HQ to downtown Raleigh

Linux is a win-win for education

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Linux

zdnet.co.uk: Articles on the use of Linux for educational purposes have come up frequently, some focus on the use of Linux in educational institutions. Often times, these institutions are looking to save as much money as possible, and using Linux can be a good option for just that reason.

Pardus 2011 review

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Linux

linuxbsdos.com: Pardus is a desktop-oriented Linux distribution with roots in the National Research Institute of Electronics and Cryptology (UEKAE), Turkey. This article is a review of Pardus 2011, the latest stable release, which was made available for download on January 20, 2011.

Also: My Netbook running Pardus 2011

Review: Linux Mint 10 Julia Gnome

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Linux

g33q.co.za: Linux Mint 10 Julia has been around for a while now, but I have not gotten around to reviewing it. Now after using it for a while and getting to know it I decided to write up and post a review of this, arguably the best Linux Distro available.

Bodhi Linux is a Lightweight Linux Distribution

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Linux

ubuntuvibes.com: Bodhi Linux is a light weight and minimalistic distribution in development that is based on Enlightenment 'E 17' Desktop Environment. At its core, Bodhi Linux is based on Ubuntu 10.04.

Quick Look: Dreamlinux 3.5 GNOME

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Linux

eyeonlinux.com: Dreamlinux has been requested a number of times since the blog launched, and this week I’ve finally gotten around to taking a peek at it. Dreamlinux is based on Debian and it comes with Xfce or GNOME as the default desktop. I picked the GNOME version for this quick look.

Eight Completely Free Linux Distros (And One More)

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Linux

earthweb.com: All Linux distributions are supposed to be free, but some distributions are freer than others. Because some gaps remain in free software functionality, many distributions, including Ubuntu, include proprietary applications. Here are brief descriptions of each of them to help you make up your mind:

Fedora Linux suffers a security incident - compromise risk is minimal

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Linux

internetnews.com: "At this time, the Infrastructure Team has evidence that indicates the account credentials were compromised externally, and that the Fedora Infrastructure was not subject to any code vulnerability or exploit," Fedora Project Leader Jared Smith stated.

One Package Manager for them All

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Linux
Software

ostatic.com: The idea of one universal package format for all distributions has been batted around a few times over the years. One of the most notable was Ryan C. Gordon's idea of FatELF files. Well, it seems a new team from major distributions is coming together to implement a "common application installer API and infrastructure."

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Chromixium – An Ubuntu Based Google’s Chrome OS Clone

Today, We have come up with an interesting news for both Ubuntu and Chrome OS users. Meet Chromixium – the new modern desktop operating system based on Ubuntu that has the functionality, look and feel of Google’s “Chrome OS”. Chromixium has brought the elegant simplicity of Chromebook and flexibility and stability of Ubuntu together. Chromixium puts the web front and center of the user experience. Web and Chrome apps work straight out of the browser to connect you to all your personal, work and education networks. Sign into Chromium to sync all your apps and bookmarks. When you are offline or when you need more power, you can install any number of applications for work or play, including LibreOffice, Skype, Steam and a whole lot more. Security updates are installed seamlessly and effortlessly in the background and will be supplied until 2019. You can install Chromixium in place of any existing operating system, or alongside Windows or Linux. Read more

BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review: A promising start

The first 'production' smartphone running the Ubuntu operating system is finally here. Designed and marketed by the Spanish company BQ (not to be confused with the Chinese company BQ Mobile) and made in China, the first Ubuntu Phone is based on the 4.5-inch BQ Aquaris E4.5, which normally ships with Android 4.4. Included with the BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition are two copies of the quick-start guide (in four languages each, one of the eight being English), a charger (with a built-in two-pin continental mains plug) and a 1-metre USB-to-Micro-USB cable. A comprehensive User Manual is available for download from the BQ website. The list price for the Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition, which is only available in the EU, is €169.90 (~£125). Read more Also: Ubuntu and Windows set to contest desktop/smartphone hybrid market Ubuntu phone that works as a desktop PC coming in 2015

Enabling Open Source SDN and NFV in the Enterprise

I recently attended the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) in Shenzhen, China, to promote Intel’s software defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) software solutions. During this year’s IDF, Intel has made several announcements and our CEO Brian Krzanich showcased Intel’s innovation leadership across a wide range of technologies with our local partners in China. On the heel of Krzanich’s announcements, Intel Software & Services Group Senior VP Doug Fisher extended Krzanich’s message to stress the importance of open source collaboration to drive industry innovation and transformation, citing OpenStack and Hadoop as prime examples. Read more Also: Myth-Busting the Open-Source Cloud Part 2