Linux

Kernel or distros

Starting Vector Linux

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Linux

Welcome to part five of a series for beginners explaining what Linux is, where it came from, where it's going, how to use it and why you should. This article gives an overview of Vector Linux, what it can do, and how it works...

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The first three books every Linux user should read

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Linux

Anyone proficient with Linux had to climb the steep learning curve. Part of getting over the top for me was reading a hundred different Linux and Unix related books. From that list, three books stand out as the most useful and influential. I can't promise easy sledding; it will take some work, but mastering this material will demystify Linux and make you appreciate it more.

Debian Etch: Solid, Crufty, Some Assembly Required

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Linux

Debian is the the quietest big Linux distro. I see hourly posts on Distrowatch, Slashdot and Digg about the latest builds of Ubuntu and SUSE, and even Mark Shuttleworth’s wearing of a KDE t-shirt is considered news. I presume that things are fine inside Debian and that no gnus is good gnus, but also I believe, as Oscar Wilde said: “What’s worse than being talked about is not being talked about.”

Wizard's Kid-Safe LiveCD Version .20- beta Released

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Linux

If you saw my review of Wizard's Kid-Safe Livecd and thought it sounded like a good idea, but had a few concerns, perhaps they are addressed in Version .20-beta.

Hands on: 3D eye candy for Linux

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Linux

There have been some significant developments lately on the Linux desktop front.

For a long time, X.org has supported 3D rendering in applications and games, but the desktops themselves have not.

Puppy Linux 1.0.9 CE

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Linux
Reviews
-s

It'd been quite a while since we reported on Puppy Linux, so with the release of 1.0.9ce, we thought it was about time. However, since the developers are concentrating on the 2.0 branch, this release is a community developed update. Featuring Firefox 1.5.0.3, xdg dynamically generated menus, enhanced and simplified interface, and many bugfixes, we were anxious to see how Puppy turned out.

Stable Linux Kernel 2.6.16.17 Released

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Linux

Chris Wright and the -stable folks have released Linux Kernel update 2.6.16.17. It contains mostly security patches with a few other interesting notes. The PCI quirk fix for VIA southbridges and udev device creation fix look interesting.

A Rebuttal To Mark Golden's Wall Street Journal Article

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Linux

On May 15th Mark Golden wrote an article for the Wall Street Journal titled Out The Window where he posed the question: “Can the ordinary user ditch Windows for Linux?” His conclusion, in most cases, is a resounding no. Sadly Mr. Golden’s methodology in trying out Linux for his article bears little resemblance to what an ordinary user trying out Linux would likely do. Indeed, his approach almost guaranteed his results.

City finds big savings in Linux

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Linux

Ruth Schall remembers when vendors and fellow IT directors would look at her network and scratch their heads. Now, instead of expressing surprise at the broad use of Linux , Kenosha's peers are calling for advice.

Linux Is Capitalist!

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Linux

In 2000, Microsoft's Steve Ballmer made a questionable remark: he referred to Linux (and the open source/free software community) and its development process as "communist." Just because a product is free of charge it does not mean that it is communist.

Linux goes after the desktop

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Linux

A WIDELY backed effort is under way to create a standard Linux desktop to help break Microsoft's stranglehold.

The Free Standards Group, which is backed by at least 14 software makers, aims to make it easier for developers to write applications that will work on different versions of Linux.

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Linux System Administration in the New ERA

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Linux

The success of Mozilla's Firefox and Openoffice.org's productivity suite has breathed life into people's aspirations about Desktop Linux. As a result, the vast majority of articles published today focus there and ignore the strides made on the Linux server. Unlike the Linux server of the past, today's version supports rocket science and its gains far exceed those of the Desktop.

Reclusive Linux founder opens up

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Linux
Interviews

Portland, Oregon is the unlikely capital of a global software revolution. The revolution is called Open Source. And its leader? Linus Torvalds, the reclusive founder of Linux.

Red Hat: Java Linux license does not go far enough

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Linux

Sun Microsystems' new GNU/Linux-friendly Java license does not go far enough for Red Hat. It says Sun should have open-sourced Java instead.

Cuba to switch computers to Linux, dumping Windows

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Linux

Cuba will gradually switch to the open-source Linux operating system for its state computers, eliminating its exclusive use of Microsoft Windows, the government daily Juventud Rebelde reported Tuesday.

Burning or Writing DVDs Under Debian

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Linux
Ubuntu

If you want to burn DVD's in debian you need to install the "dvd+rw-tools" package.

dvd+rw-tools makes it possible to burn DVD images created by dvdauthor or mkisofs to DVD+R, DVD+RW, DVD-R, and DVD-RW disks, replacing cdrecord-proDVD in many cases.

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Symphony OS 2006-05 Beta (act 5)

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Linux
Reviews
-s

I've always followed SymphonyOS with great enthusiam. I admire folks who march to a different, or even moreso, their own beat. Symphony has always done that. They have few rivals for the title of Most Unique Desktop. Each release builds more and more excitement as things begin to shape up and improve. Symphony OS 2006-05 BETA is upon us and just like its predecessors, it's still different and ever improving. This time they have some great new features to introduce as well as some underlying code changes to announce. All this comes together to provide the greatest Symphony OS yet.

Emu Software to Sponsor Red Hat Summit 2006

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Linux

Emu Software, a commercial open source configuration management vendor and sponsor of the Second Annual Red Hat Summit, will use the Summit to unveil the soon-to-be-released Red Hat Network (RHN) module for their NetDirector product. The module provides seamless integration between RHN's patching and provisioning and NetDirector's multi-server configuration management capabilities.

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