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Linux

Linux Mint 17 “Quiana” RC released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux Mint is an open source operating system based on Ubuntu, but with an emphasis on ease of use, simple installation of proprietary media codecs, and a choice of desktop environments that look a bit more like classic Windows than the Unity UI used in recent versions of Ubuntu.

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Hiring Linux to Run Your Small Business

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GNU
Linux

Individuals and businesses migrate to Linux for a variety of reasons. Disgust with Microsoft or Apple regimentation and software limitations are but two of them.

For some, the greater flexibility that comes from open source software, as well as better cost and productivity controls, are the driving factors for a move to the Linux OS. The benefits vary depending on the use case and the desktop or server configurations employed.

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5 Linux Gadgets Every Geek Should Have

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Linux

Some people really love the Linux operating system that is why the gadgets are rightly named as “Linux Nerds”. Many machines now use Linux as the base to develop their other operating systems.

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Opera for Linux release imminent?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

When Norwegian company Opera Software announced that it would switch its trusted Presto engine to Chromium, it caused quite the stir among users.

Some congratulated Opera Software for the move as it improved web standards compatibility and speed among other things.

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Enlightenment Linux: It's not What You Think

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Learning how to navigate within the Enlightenment shell is where the learning curve occurs. A second, steeper curve involves figuring out how to massage the seemingly endless options to customize the desktop functionality. If you have lots of time to devote to learning something new within something old, check out Enlightenment -- but do it through a distro built around it.

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Multi-wireless module runs Linux, targets IoT gateways

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Linux

ConnectBlue announced a tiny multi-wireless COM with Bluetooth 4.0, dual-band WiFi, and dual-Ethernet connectivity, and running Linux on a TI Sitara SoC.

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Snapdragon-based COM supports extreme temperatures

Filed under
Android
Linux

Variscite announced a COM based on Qualcomm’s 1.7GHz quad-core Snapdragon APQ8064 SoC, supported with Android and Linux, and usable from -40 to 85°C.

The VAR-SOM-SD600 builds upon the same Snapdragon APQ8064 system-on-chip as another computer-on-module announced this week: CompuLab’s CM-QS600. Qualcomm’s 1.7GHz, quad-core SoC is also known as the S4 Pro, and Variscite refers to it under the broader Snapdragon 600 nomenclature. The Snapdragon APQ8064 is equivalent to a quad-core Cortex-A15-based SoC, featuring a quartet of 28nm-fabricated 1.7GHz “Krait” cores with 11-stage pipeline and out-of-order execution. The Krait cores are accommodated by 2MB of L2 cache, an integrated Adreno 320 GPU, and a 500MHz “Hexagon” QDSP6V4 DSP (digital signal processor).

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Linux Kernel 3.10.40 Is Out with Multiple Fixes and Improvements

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Linux

The amount of changes and fixes for this branch of the Linux kernel is large, considering the build number. This is, after all, an LTS release and it has been around for quite some time. There is no sign that the maintenance for 3.10.x is stopping anytime soon, so you should make the best of it.

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Interview With Jennifer Cloer, Director of Communications at The Linux Foundation

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Linux
Interviews

Jennifer Cloer

TUX MACHINES has caught up with Jennifer Cloer, who is the director of communications at The Linux Foundation. Our short interview focuses on Linux in devices and some of the existing challenges.


Tux Machines: As the growth of Linux accelerates, especially on devices, patent pressure intensifies. Short of patent reform, which is seemingly too slow to arrive, how can one counter threats to the zero-cost advantage of Linux?

Jennifer Cloer: Certainly, we have to be mindful of patent issues, as does anyone working in the software industry, whether they work on open source or proprietary software. It is an issue. But given the massive community that supports and depends on Linux, there are hundreds of companies and thousands of developers invested in Linux and prepared to defend the operating system every day.

TM: Android is becoming the de facto standard platform in several areas, but it is also the carrier of many proprietary apps. How do the mobile Linux platforms backed by the Linux Foundation distinguish themselves from this?

JC: The Linux Foundation supports and “backs” all Linux-based platforms. The more people building with Linux and contributing back to the kernel, the better for everyone. Platforms will distinguish themselves in a number of ways but that will be determined by the communities, developers and companies supporting those platforms.

TM: Short of lobbying, how can one help politicians or CIOs grasp the advantages of software that they have full control over?

JC: Governments and CIOs understand the advantages now more than ever. Governments around the world are embracing open source and have been for years now. CIOs are increasingly using Linux and open source as the building blocks for their enterprises, especially as the cloud has become so prominent. In our latest Enterprise End User Report, 80 percent of users said they would increase their use of Linux over the next five years; just 20 percent said they would increase their use of Windows during the same time period.

TM: The Linux Foundation recently organised events in Europe, including the UK. Are there plans of expanding such initiatives?

JC: The Linux Foundation hosts LinuxCon and CloudOpen in Europe every year. This year we’ll be in Dusseldorf October 13-15, 2014. We will continue to host other events in Europe, too, such as Embedded Linux Conference and KVM Forum. We’ll also host ApacheCon and CloudStack Conference in Europe in Budapest on November 17-21, 2014.

Raspberry Pi software updates - what's new

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Linux

It has been pretty quiet on the Raspberry Pi operating system since the rash of updates around Christmas/New Year.

Not that there hasn't been plenty of other interesting things going on, of course, but the basic operating systems themselves had been stable. Not so any more, suddenly there is a rash of new releases, so it's time to take a fresh look at my favourite little computer!

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