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Linux

Systemd Gets An Fsck Daemon/Service

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Linux

The newest addition to systemd just a day after landing its new EFI boot manager is systemd-fsckd. This new addition was done by Ubuntu developers.

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Raspberry Pi Sells Over 5 Million Units to Date

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Development
Linux

It is hard to believe that the Raspberry Pi has been around for three years already. Launched back in 2012, the credit card-sized PC attracted quite a bit of attention due to its $35 price and potential ability to encourage programming with children. Today, it was revealed that over 5 million units of Raspberry Pi have been sold to date.

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Sony taps Linux robot car tech for self-driving car project

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Linux

Sony is developing self-driving car technologies with ZMP, which sells autonomous RoboCar development platforms with Linux-based control and sensor systems.

Sony has turned to fellow Japanese company ZMP to develop a self-driving car, says the Financial Times (FT). Sony also invested 100 million yen ($842,000) in ZMP for a 2 percent share. The partners are not necessarily building a commercial self-driving car — FT says they will develop “self-driving car technologies.” But whether it’s a full car or an autonomous automotive imaging system, it will likely run on Linux. Since 2009, ZMP has been selling autonomous plug-in hybrid RoboCar development platforms that integrate Linux control and sensing systems.

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Bloomberg Joins the Linux Foundation as Gold Member

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Linux

Bloomberg, the global business and financial information company, has joined the Linux Foundation as a Gold member.

Bloomberg offers a lot of services which require state-of-the-art technologies and they are increasing the consumption of, and contribution to, Open Source technologies. Some of the major open source technologies they use include Linux, Hadoop, OpenStack and Solr.

“Bloomberg is a big supporter of open innovation and open source initiatives that align with our software development and business priorities,” said Shawn Edwards, Chief Technology Officer at Bloomberg LP.

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Should Linux distro developers expect to be paid for their work?

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Linux

I wrote a column a while back called “Distro developers need dollars” where I included links to distro donation pages. My thought then was that it was a good idea for distro developers to get financial support from users whenever possible. I still feel that way, however, there’s a flip side to that idea too.

What happens when a distro developer solicits financial support in a way that some people think is obnoxious? Is it possible for developers to go too far in trying to make money from their distribution? The recent situation with Elementary OS is a good example of what happens when distro developers do things in what can charitably be called an undiplomatic way.

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Intel now No. 1 sponsor of Linux contributions

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Development
Linux
Hardware

Intel, one of the world's largest computer hardware companies, is now also among the biggest contributors to open-source software.

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New ARM Platform Support For The Linux 3.20 Kernel

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Linux

With the next kernel -- regardless of whether it be known as Linux 3.20 or Linux 4.0 -- it will contain support for new ARM platforms.

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Also: Enea Linux and System Management on the ARMv8-Based AMD Embedded R-Series Processor

Gorgeous Ozon OS "Hydrogen" to Get a Beta Very Soon

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Linux
Red Hat

Ozon OS "Hydrogen" is a new Linux distribution based on Fedora 21 developed by a team from Nitrux and Numix. It's been in the works for quite some time and it looks like a new Beta release is almost here.

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Linux kernel development has gone CORPORATE – report

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Linux

The Linux kernel is growing and changing faster than ever, but its development is increasingly being supported by a select group of companies, rather than by volunteer developers.

That's according to the latest survey of Linux kernel of development by the Linux Foundation, which it published to coincide with the kickoff of this year's Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit on Wednesday.

The survey found that coders who claimed no company affiliation, or for whom an affiliation could not be determined, accounted for just 16.4 per cent of the total number of contributions to the kernel. Independent consultants made up another 2.5 per cent.

The rest all came from coders working on behalf of companies large and small. And while individual contributors seldom made a huge impact on the kernel – most made ten or few changes to the kernel over the last three years – their combined efforts made a huge difference.

The latest version of the Linux kernel to be released before the report was compiled, version 3.18, comprised some 18,997,848 lines of code.

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CrunchBang: The Rest of the Story

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Here’s the rest of the story regarding successors, spins or forks of CrunchBang. The tech media is falling over itself reporting that the “successor” to CrunchBang is something called #!++ which, to many CrunchBang insiders, is nothing more than one — but not “the resurrection” — project based on CrunchBang. It’s a project that appears, in the opinion of many CrunchBang contributors, as one that is trying to capitalize on the name, now that it’s “available,” in a manner of speaking.

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More in Tux Machines

LXQt 0.12.0 Desktop Environment Released with Better Support for HiDPI Displays

The developers of the Lightweight Qt Desktop Environment (LXQt) were proud to announce today the release and immediate availability for download of the LXQt 0.12.0 desktop environment. Read more Also: LXQt 0.12 released With Better HiDPI Support, More Robust

GNOME 3.27.1 RELEASED

GNOME 3.25.1, the first unstable release in the 3.28 development cycle, is now available. The porting of more modules to meson continues (which is great!), but It's still causing some problems for some modules. See below. If you want to compile GNOME 3.27.1 by yourself, you can use the JHBuild modulesets available here: Read more Also: GNOME 3.27.1 Released

today's leftovers

  • Another Million Learn About GNU/Linux
    Ordinarily, I would not notice or even recommend a brief article in a magazine but this is Popular Science, the Bible of DIY types especially the young and restless who might actually take the plunge into FLOSS (Free/Libre Open Source Software). It’s a general magazine with a million subscribers.
  • Chromium 62 ready for download
    chromium_iconEarlier this week, Google released a security update for its chrome/chromium browser. The new version 62.0.3202.62 plugs the holes of 35 more or less serious issues, several of them have a CVE rating. When the topic of Chromium 62 came up in the comments section of a previous post, I mentioned that I was unable to compile it on Slackware 14.2. Errors like “error: static assertion failed: Bound argument |i| of type |Arg| cannot be converted and bound as |Storage|” yield some results when looked up on the Internet, and they indicate that Slackware’s own gcc-5.3.0 package is too old to compile chromium 62.
  • Playing with the pine64
     

    So I went for OpenBSD because I know the stuff and who to har^Wkindly ask for help. Spoiler alert, it's boring because it just works.

  • PrismTech Moves Market-Leading Proven DDS Solution to Open Source as Eclipse Cyclone
  • Nana Oforiatta Ayim’s Open-Source Encyclopedia of African History Starts With Ghana
    It is a rare kind of woman who enjoys a project so vast that it’s practically unfinishable, but Nana Oforiatta Ayim, a Ghanaian gallerist, writer, and historian, never quits what she has started. She’s discussing her work on the "Cultural Encyclopaedia", an attempt to “facilitate the re/ordering of knowledge, narratives, and representations from and about the African continent” through an online resource that includes an A-to-Z index and vertices of clickable images for entries. Eventually, a 54-volume book series—one for each country on the continent—will be published with selections from the encyclopedia's long, long list. Oforiatta Ayim is working with a small team of editors, and, starting with her native country, she has taken on the task of documenting all significant cultural touchstones in the thousands of years of African history. Plus, it will be open source to prevent it from having a top-down logic. “I’m a little bit crazy to take it on,” she says. “But if I’m not going to do it, who is going to be as crazy as me?”
  • The Only Person I’ll Pair Program with is my Cat
     

    I could argue (to varying degrees of success) that pair programming isn’t productive. Productivity of a practice is an easy thing to attack because, in our capitalist dystopia, it’s the end-all-be-all metric. But I hate pair programming, and it’s not just because I don’t feel productive. It’s a lot more than that.

  • Reaper: IoT botnet 'worse than Mirai' infects one million organisations worldwide
     

    Check Point first unearthed the botnet, codenamed 'IoT_reaper', at the beginning of September and claims that, since, it's already enslaved millions of IoT devices including routers and IP cameras from firms including GoAhead, D-Link, TP-Link, Avtech, Netgear, MikroTik, Linksys and Synology.

  • Google will pay out bounties for bad Android app flaws
     

    "Google Play is working with the independent bug bounty platform, HackerOne, and the developers of popular Android apps to implement the Google Play Security Reward Program. Developers of popular Android apps are invited to opt-in to the program, which will incentivize security research in a bug bounty model," says HackerOne.

today's howtos