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Linux

The only remaining barrier to entry for Linux

Filed under
Linux

The only reason more people aren't using Linux is because they can't go to a big box store and purchase a computer with Linux pre-installed. If the masses could head over to Best Buy or Target and drop a few hundred dollars for a PC running Linux, they'd be using Linux. Why? Because they'd discover an operating system that includes the one tool they mostly use and won't be plagued with the same tired issues they've faced over the last couple of decades.

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Samsung says data-eating TRIM bug is a Linux kernel problem

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Linux

Algolia says Samsung has developed a patch for the Linux kernel that solves the problem. The patch was set to be released to the Linux community on July 18, along with Samsung's official statement on the matter and details of the issue, but as of today (July 21), the patch has apparently not been released. We'll try and get our hands on a copy of the statement to see what's up when it arrives.

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Shashlik - a Tasty New Android Simulator

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux

Although the Linux kernel forms the beating heart of the Android operating system, it's still a very different platform from most distros. In fact, beyond the kernel, most of the libraries, services and applications are completely different. While there are hundreds of different Linux distros out there, they all share components from the GNU project. Android, on the other hand, has taken a completely different route, tailored to the requirements of mobile devices.

As a result, it's not been possible to run Android apps natively on GNU Linux systems without using a virtual machine. Obviously running a VM and the complete Android stack adds a lot of overhead, and as a result, Android apps tend to run much slower. This is bad news for developers, who must run their apps thousands of times over during development and testing, and although it is possible to run tests through a device via a USB connection, it's still clumsy.

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Linux Kernel 4.1.3 LTS Is Now the Most Advanced Version Available

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Linux

The latest version of the stable Linux kernel, 4.1.3, has been made available by Greg Kroah-Hartman, which means that this is now the most advanced version released.

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Tiny Yocto-ready ARM COM supports industrial temps

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Linux

Gumstix launched a Linux-ready Overo COM with an 800MHz TI DM3730 SoC, 1GB of flash,, a microSD slot, a camera input, and support for -40 to 85°C temperatures.

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7 Current Trends on the Linux Desktop

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Linux

Desktop environments are supposed to be yesterday's technology, gradually being replaced by mobile devices. Yet someone apparently forgot to tell the developers of Linux desktops. At a time when desktops are supposed to be obsolete, Linux offers more alternatives than ever. Apparently, Linux users are not prepared to give up their workstations and laptops for tablets or phones.

Of course, the modern Linux desktop is not the Linux desktop of five years. If you look at the Linux desktop today, at least seven development trends are visible, including several that are reversals of popular past trends.

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Black Lab Linux Xfce 15.7 is out now. Distro Review and Installation Guide

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
HowTos

Black Lab Linux is all about power; it is a complete operating system and should work perfectly fine for all kind of Linux lovers. It is lightweight, boot time is pretty impressive, user interface is charming and working of the operating system is quick. Try it out now, our verdict; you will not be disappointed.

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Linux Foundation unboxes another container consortium

Filed under
Linux
Server

A mere month after Docker and other companies formed the Open Container Project, which placed their software-containerization concepts under the control of the Linux Foundation, another major initiative involving containers is taking off -- and many of the same people are in the driver's seat and riding along.

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ADAS dev board runs Yocto Linux on octa-core SoC

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Linux

Renesas unveiled a Linux-based Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) starter kit based on its R-Car H2 SoC, supporting PCIe, HDMI, and multiple cameras.

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My Linux Story

Filed under
Linux
OSS

I am Technical Trainer and Consultant specializing in Open Source technologies. The majority of my career has centered around Linux operating system deployment, configuration, and interoperability. I mostly work with Red Hat products and their upstream and downstream projects. For the past two years I have also worked with Cloudera and projects related to the Apache Hadoop ecosystem. I also have a particular interest in security topics.

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More in Tux Machines

Best Linux apps of 2018

While everyone knows that most Linux distributions (distros) are free to download, not everybody is aware that you also have access to thousands of cost-free applications through your operating system’s package manager. Many of the more user-friendly distros will come with a selection of software preinstalled to help you get started, but there are many more apps out in the wild, under continuous development. Read more

today's leftovers

  • CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes
    Harry (Lei) Zhang, together with the CTO of HyperHQ, Xu Wang, will present “CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes” at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU 2018, May 2-4 in Copenhagen, Denmark. The presentation will clarify about more about CRI, container runtimes, KataContainers and where they are going. Please join them if you are interested in learning more.
  • Meet Gloo, the ‘Function Gateway’ That Unifies Legacy APIs, Microservices, and Serverless
    Gloo, a single binary file written in Go, can be deployed as a Kubernetes pod, in a Docker container, and now also on Cloud Foundry. The setup also requires a copy of Envoy, though the installation process can be greatly simplified through additional software developed by the company, TheTool. The user then writes configuration objects to capture the workflow logic.
  • Why is the kernel community replacing iptables with BPF?

    The Linux kernel community recently announced bpfilter, which will replace the long-standing in-kernel implementation of iptables with high-performance network filtering powered by Linux BPF, all while guaranteeing a non-disruptive transition for Linux users.

  • The developer of Helium Rain gave an update on their sales, low overall sales but a high Linux percentage
    Helium Rain [Steam, Official Site], the gorgeous space sim from Deimos Games is really quite good so it's a shame they've seen such low overall sales. In total, they've had around 14,000€ (~$17,000) in sales which is not a lot for a game at all. The good news, is that out of the two thousand copies they say they've sold, a huge 14% of them have come from Linux. It's worth noting, that number has actually gone up since we last spoke to them, where they gave us a figure of 11% sales on Linux.
  • Want to try Wild Terra Online? We have another load of keys to give away (update: all gone)
    Wild Terra Online [Steam], the MMO from Juvty Worlds has a small but dedicated following, now is your chance to see if it's for you.
  • Arch Linux Finally Rolling Out Glibc 2.27
    Arch Linux is finally transitioning to glibc 2.27, which may make for a faster system. Glibc 2.27 was released at the start of February. This updated GNU C Library shipped with many performance optimizations particularly for Intel/x86_64 but also some ARM tuning and more. Glibc 2.27 also has memory protection keys support and other feature additions, but the performance potential has been most interesting to us.
  • Installed nvidia driver
  • Stephen Smoogen: Fedora Infrastructure Hackathon (day 1-5)
  • Design and Web team summary – 20 April 2018
    The team manages all web projects across Canonical. From www.ubuntu.com to the Juju GUI we help to bring beauty and consistency to all the web projects.
  • Costales: UbuCon Europe 2018 | 1 Week to go!!
    We'll have an awesome weekend of conferences (with 4 parallel talks), podcasts, stands, social events... Most of them are in English, but there will be in Spanish & Asturian too.
  • Tough, modular embedded PCs start at $875
    Advantech has launched two rugged, Linux-ready embedded DIN-rail computers with Intel Bay Trail SoCs and iDoor expansion: an “UNO-1372G-E” with 3x GbE ports and a smaller UNO-1372G-J with only 2x GbE, but with more serial and USB ports.

OSS Leftovers

  • IRS Website Crash Reminder of HealthCare.gov Debacle as OMB Pushes Open Source
    OMB is increasingly pushing agencies to adopt open source solutions, and in 2016 launched a pilot project requiring at least 20 percent of custom developed code to be released as open source – partly to strengthen and help maintain it by tapping a community of developers. OMB memo M-16-21 further asks agencies to make any code they develop available throughout the federal government in order to encourage its reuse. “Open source solutions give agencies access to a broad community of developers and the latest advancements in technology, which can help alleviate the issues of stagnated or out-dated systems while increasing flexibility as agency missions evolve over time,” says Henry Sowell, chief information security officer at Hortonworks Federal. “Enterprise open source also allows government agencies to reduce the risk of vendor lock-in and the vulnerabilities of un-supported software,” he adds.
  • Migrations: the sole scalable fix to tech debt.

    Migrations are both essential and frustratingly frequent as your codebase ages and your business grows: most tools and processes only support about one order of magnitude of growth before becoming ineffective, so rapid growth makes them a way of life. This isn't because they're bad processes or poor tools, quite the opposite: the fact that something stops working at significantly increased scale is a sign that it was designed appropriately to the previous constraints rather than being over designed.

  • Gui development is broken

    Why is this so hard? I just want low-level access to write a simple graphical interface in a somewhat obscure language.

OpenBSD and NetBSD