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Parallels to line up with Linux containers

Filed under
Linux

Parallels is working to bring its automation, security and management wares to the burgeoning world of Linux containerisation.

The junior virtualiser finds itself in an interesting position vis a vis Linux containers and Docker, because it has long described its own Virtuozzo product as offering containers. But Virtuozzo is closer to conventional virtualisation than containerisation, because it wraps an operating system rather than just an application.

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Simplicity Linux 14.10 Alpha Is an OS Based on Slacko 5.9.3 and Linux kernel 3.15.4

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux
Slack

The developers of Simplicity Linux have based their system on Slacko 5.9.3 and they are using the 3.15.4 Linux kernel. This kernel is one of the newest available and should provide adequate hardware support for the latest devices. Also, unlike previous releases in the series, the new version covers only two flavors, Netbook and Desktop.

The Netbook flavor is a simpler operating system, with fewer default applications and an accessible desktop experience. It's also a smaller ISO, so users won't need too much space for the actual size of the Linux distribution.

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Fanning the Flames of the Systemd Inferno

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Linux

They say art imitates life, but it's surprising how often the same can be said of the Linux blogs.

Case in point: Just as the world at large is filled today with fiery strife -- Gaza, Ukraine, Syria, Ferguson -- so, too, is the Linux blogosphere. Of course, it's not political, social or racial struggles tearing the FOSS community apart. Rather, the dividing issue here is none other than Systemd.

Systemd is a topic that's been discussed in heated terms many times before, of course -- including a lively debate here in the Linux Blog Safari back in May.

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Trying Intel OpenCL On Linux For Video Encoding

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
OSS

The open-source x264 program does support OpenCL acceleration -- when building x264 it will check for the presence of OpenCL development support and then at runtime the --opencl switch must be passed for exploiting the potential of any OpenCL hardware. The x264 test profile part of the Phoronix Test Suite is strictly intended for CPU-based testing so this weekend I added a x264-opencl test profile that uses the same revision of x264 and the same media file, but the only difference is that it forces OpenCL support. So now with the Phoronix Test Suite it's as easy as running phoronix-test-suite benchmark x264 x264-opencl to run the CPU-bound x264 and the OpenCL version for easy comparison purposes.

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Sony Joins AllSeen Internet of Things Alliance

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Linux

The Linux Foundation's Allseen Alliance has a new member today. Sony has announced that it is joining AllSeen in a bid to bolster its Internet of Things (IoT) presence.

The AllSeen project got started in December of 2013 as an effort to build an open standards based approach to IoT. The big initial core code contribution that started the project is open-source technology first built by Qualcomm, known as the AllJoyn project.

By June of this year, Allseen had already grown to 50 members and now Sony will expand that number further.

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Camera Pi – How Raspberry Pi can see

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Linux

Robots provided with autonomous operation capabilities and, particularly, those sporting sense organs similar to the human ones, have always tickled the fancy of science fiction writers and screenwriters.

As always happens, from a certain point in history, even official science has started to deal with the subject, at first with the so-called “strong theses”, whose objective was to reproduce, to substitute, the capabilities that are typical of humans.

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The Companies That Support Linux: SanDisk Advances Storage Industry

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Linux
Interviews

A growing dependency on digital data has spurred new interest in flash storage technologies along with cloud-based services and storage. With the broadest portfolio of flash-memory based solutions in the industry, SanDisk is on the leading edge of this transformation, with Linux and open source at the heart of its innovation. By working with hundreds of open source projects in compute, storage, and networking, SanDisk can help enable software stacks to take advantage of flash’s behavior and performance, says Nithya Ruff, director of the SanDisk Open Source Strategy Office.

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boycott systemd

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

systemd0 is a replacement for the sysvinit daemon used in GNU/Linux and Unix systems, originally authored by Lennart Poettering of Red Hat. It represents a monumental increase in complexity, an abhorrent and violent slap in the face to the Unix philosophy, and its inherent domineering and viral nature turns it into something akin to a "second kernel" that is spreading all across the Linux ecosystem.

This site aims to serve as a rundown and a wake-up call to take a stand against the widespread proliferation of systemd, to detail why it is harmful, and to persuade users to reject its use.

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Tails 1.1.1 is out

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
Debian

The next Tails release is scheduled for October 14.

Have a look to our roadmap to see where we are heading to.

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You have your Windows in my Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Although there are those who think the systemd debate has been decided in favor of systemd, the exceedingly loud protests on message boards, forums, and the posts I wrote over the past two weeks would indicate otherwise. I've seen many declarations of victory for systemd, now that Red Hat has forced it into the enterprise with the release of RHEL 7. I don't think it's that easy.

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Development News

Security Leftovers

  • How To Improve The Linux System’s Security Using Firejail
    As you already know, Linux kernel is secure by default. But, it doesn’t mean that the softwares on the Linux system are completely secure. Say for example, there is a possibility that any add-ons on your web browser may cause some serious security issues. While doing financial transactions over internet, some key logger may be active in browser which you are not aware of. Even though, we can’t completely give the bullet-proof security to our Linux box, we still can add an extra pinch of security using an application called Firejail. It is a security utility which can sandbox any such application and let it to run in a controlled environment. To put this simply, Firejail is a SUID (Set owner User ID up on execution) program that reduces the risk of security breaches by restricting the running environment of untrusted applications.
  • “Httpd and Relayd Mastery” off to copyedit
  • Kalyna Block Cipher

Containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs

  • Setting the Record Straight: containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs
    I’m tired of having the same conversation over and over again with people so I figured I would put it into a blog post. Many people ask me if I have tried or what I think of Solaris Zones / BSD Jails. The answer is simply: I have tried them and I definitely like them. The conversation then heads towards them telling me how Zones and Jails are far superior to containers and that I should basically just give up with Linux containers and use VMs. Which to be honest is a bit forward to someone who has spent a large portion of her career working with containers and trying to make containers more secure. Here is what I tell them:
  • [Old] Hadoop Has Failed Us, Tech Experts Say

    The Hadoop community has so far failed to account for the poor performance and high complexity of Hadoop, Johnson says. “The Hadoop ecosystem is still basically in the hands of a small number of experts,” he says. “If you have that power and you’ve learned know how to use these tools and you’re programmer, then this thing is super powerful. But there aren’t a lot of those people. I’ve read all these things how we need another million data scientists in the world, which I think means our tools aren’t very good.”