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Zenwalk 7: Shall We DANCE?

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Linux

mandrivachronicles.blogspot: Five days ago, I wrote about my epic fail trying to install Zenwalk 7 to my netbook, a system already running several Linux distros. I was not prepared to face the install but, as I promised, after doing some reading, I am ready to give it another go. Zenwalk 7, shall we dance?

Adventures in Chakra Linux

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Linux

linuxblog.darkduck: My previous post was devoted to my attempts to run Chakra Linux on my laptop in Live mode. Neither CD nor Unetbootin'ed flash drive worked. Then decided to look for an answer to my doubts on Chakra Linux's official web page. Did it work?

Slacking the South African Way: Meeting Kongoni GNU/Linux!

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Linux

linuxmigrante.blogspot: I had been wanting to try some Slackware based distro for some time. Why? If you say you like Linux and haven't tried Slackware, the oldest GNU/Linux alive (yes! Ubuntu is NOT the oldest, for the record! Tongue), you are missing your roots. Not enough reason, you say?

Winning: Q&A with Jim Whitehurst, Red Hat CEO

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Linux
Interviews

cbronline.com: Red Hat's CEO Jim Whitehurst is on track to see the company pass the billion-dollar annual revenue marker. Jason Stamper speaks to him.

What's new in Linux 2.6.39

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Linux

h-online.com: The latest Linux kernel offers drivers for AMD's current high-end graphics chips and ipsets that simplify firewall implementation and maintenance. The Ext4 file system and the block layer are now said to work faster and offer improved scalability. Hundreds of new or improved drivers enhance the kernel's hardware support.

Red Hat releases Enterprise Linux 6.1

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Linux

theinquirer.net: CORPORATE LINUX VENDOR Red Hat has released Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 6.1 with numerous security updates and patches.

Fedora 15 Goes Gold

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Linux
  • Fedora 15 Goes Gold, and That's Not All
  • My Fedora 15 Pre-release experience
  • Red Hat Recognized as Top Support Website

Kernel bloat, the responsibility lies with the distribution vendor

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Linux

linuxtweaking.blogspot: It seems as time goes by the Linux Kernel is supporting more hardware and delivering more functionality. This is great but it introduces the problem of bloat. Bloat is bad but the fact of the matter is bloat cannot be avoided although it can be reduced.

Introduction to Pulp

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Linux
Software
  • Introduction to Pulp
  • Content Delivery Server Basics
  • Pulp Protected Repositories

The Linux Kernel Is Still On A Power Binge

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Linux

phoronix.com: It's been about three weeks since last mentioning the major power consumption problem in the Linux kernel (actually, there's more than one power regression) and it's affecting distributions like Ubuntu 11.04. The lack of mentioning the power regression in recent weeks isn't though because the regressions are addressed, they are still outstanding with the about to be released Linux 2.6.39 kernel.

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Red Hat

An Introduction to Linux Containers

Linux container technology is the latest computing trend sweeping the computing world. A lot of financial and technical investors, Linux software programmers, and customers are betting that containers will change the way businesses manage their computer systems—from deployment to maintenance. Container technology has become its own ecosystem with no less than 60 companies supporting some aspect of the technology. But what exactly are Linux containers, and how can they help you? Read more

Speech recognition and synthesis shield runs Linux

A startup called Audeme has crossed the halfway mark on a $12,000 Kickstarter project for its MOVI (My Own Voice Interface) speech I/O shield for Arduino single board computers. An $80 early bird package ships in Feb. 2016, and a $100 package ships in Dec. 2015. The fundraising project ends on Aug. 10. The packages include access to low level serial interfaces that will enable developers to use MOVI with other SBCs such as the Raspberry Pi, says Audeme. Read more