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TI spins Cortex-A9 Sitara SoC

Filed under
Development
Linux
Hardware

TI unveiled a 1GHz, Cortex-A9 Sitara “AM437x” SoC with a 3D GPU, a Linux SDK, and an updated PRU module for dual simultaneous control of fieldbus protocols.

The Sitara AM437x is a major upgrade to the Texas Instruments Sitara AM335x, as well as the related Sitara AM3715 and Sitara AM3874. The Sitara AM437x is said to offer up to 40 percent more processing power than previous Sitara processors.

The Sitara AM437x begins sampling in July, and is available as part of a Linux-ready, $599 TMDXEVM437X evaluation kit (see farther below). Like other Sitara SoCs, the AM437x is aimed primarily at industrial applications. Suggested pairings include factory automation, Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), home automation gateways, Internet of Things (IoT) gateways, and human machine interface (HMI).

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digiKam Software Collection 4.1.0 released

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

digiKam is the closest thing you can get in GNU/Linux based systems (also on proprietary operating systems) which costs nothing. It’s one of the many extremely polished and feature rich open source applications developed by the KDE community. The digiKam community has announced the release of version 4.1.0 which include many bug fixes for the 4.0.0 release.

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Peppermint Five Linux Brings the Cloud to Linux Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

As the world increasingly moves to cloud-based infrastructure and software-as-a-service (SaaS) applications, the needs of traditional desktop users are changing. The Peppermint OS Linux platform is an effort to integrate the cloud SaaS world with the desktop in a seamless hybrid approach. Peppermint had its 1.0 release back in 2010, and the technology has been steadily updated ever since. The Peppermint Five Linux distribution was officially released on June 23, providing an updated software base and new features for Peppermint OS users. Peppermint Five is based on the recent Ubuntu 14.04 Long Term Support (LTS) Linux release that debuted on April 17.

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The People Who Support Linux: Hacking on Linux Since Age 16

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Pretty much all of the projects in software developer Yitao Li's GitHub repository were developed on his Linux machine. None of them are necessarily Linux-specific, he says, but he uses Linux for “everything.”

For example: “coding / scripting, web browsing, web hosting, anything cloud-related, sending / receiving PGP signed emails, tweaking IP table rules, flashing OpenWrt image into routers, running one version of Linux kernel while compiling another version, doing research, doing homework (e.g., typing math equations in Tex), and many others...” Li said via email.

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CoreOS Unveils Linux Containers As A Service

Filed under
GNU
Linux

CoreOS is considered by some observers to be a fork of Google's Chrome OS system, customized for Linux server management. The system is so small because container workloads contain part of the Linux operating system themselves, the user-space parts needed by the application. But all kernel functions, such as scheduling processes and memory management, are the function of the host system and shared by whatever number of containers is running on the host. Containers also leave each workload isolated from the others in a manner that's sometimes described as "lightweight virtualization."

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LXQt Now Has Full Qt5 Support

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

The "LXQt" desktop that's a Qt version of the lightweight LXDE desktop can now be compiled using Qt5 where as previously there were still Qt4 dependencies.

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Linux 3.16-rc3

Filed under
Linux

We're back on a Sunday release schedule, and things are looking
reasonably normal.

There's perhaps relatively less driver updates than usual, with most
of them being pretty small, but that is probably just a timing thing
(ie Greg didn't send his USB/staging changes this week, so driver
changes are mostly gpu, networking and sound).

As a result misc architecture updates (mips, powerpc, x86, arm)
dominate the diff, and there are various random other updates. We've
got filesystem updates (aio, nfs and ocfs2), a small batch of mm fixes
from Andrew, some networking stuff.etc.

The shortlog gives a feel for the changes. The most noticeable to
actual users are probably the unbreaking of direct block device read
accesses on 32-bit targets, and some x86 vdso regression fixes that
caused problems. The rest probably didn't end up affecting very many
people, but it's all proper fixes..

Linus

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Robolinux 7.5.4 Wants to Be the Ultimate Windows Replacement

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Robolinux uses a piece of technology called Stealth VM Software, which allows users to create a clone of a Windows Operating System with all the installed programs and updates. It should work, in theory, but there isn't enough feedback to see how good this particular solution really is.

Besides this important feature that is one of the most important ones implemented in this distribution, the developer has also made a few other major changes and he has added quite a few new packages.

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Linux Mint 17 "Qiana" Cinnamon and MATE Flavors Get Second Release with Major Fixes

Filed under
Linux

Linux Mint 17 "Qiana" was released only a month ago, but in all that time some important issues have been fixed by the developers. In order to make the life of the users a little bit easier, the Linux mint devs have decided to regenerate the ISO images with the new fixes.

According to the changelog made available today, MDM no longer crashes with non-xrandr compatible GPUs, an option in the installer which stated "Replace $OS and install Linux Mint"has been removed because it was considered ambiguous, and the Driver Manager has been fixed because it assumed the user was running a manually installed driver when in the presence of a device which required the installation of "linux-firmware-nonfree".

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Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed Until February 2, Will Bring Linux 4.8, Newer Mesa

If you've been waiting to upgrade your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system to the 16.04.2 point release, which should have hit the streets a couple of days ago, you'll have to wait until February 2. We hate to give you guys bad news, but Canonical's engineers are still working hard these days to port all the goodies from the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) repositories to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which is a long-term supported version, until 2019. These include the Linux 4.8 kernel packages and an updated graphics stack based on a newer X.Org Server version and Mesa 3D Graphics Library. Read more