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Dell Launches Cheap Ubuntu-Powered Inspiron 15 3000 Series

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GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Dell is one of the most important providers of Ubuntu-powered hardware, and the company has just released a new laptop called Inspiron 15 3000 Series Laptop Ubuntu Edition.

Companies like Dell or IBM have helped to make Ubuntu much more popular because they sell a lot of hardware, and they are shipping that hardware with Ubuntu preinstalled. It might not seem like a big deal. After all, you can always install something else, but many customers don't switch to a different OS and Ubuntu remains installed.

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Master Linux with this great bundle of courses

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GNU
Linux

Master Linux quickly and efficiently with the next great courseware offer from TNW Deals. The Linux Learner Bundle puts you in command of the basics with 6 elite courses and 50+ hours of interactive learning content.

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Take Our Survey: Best Linux Hacker SBCs for Under $200

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Development
Linux

The 2015 Linux hacker board survey has arrived. In its second year, this collaboration between Linux.com and LinuxGizmos.com has collected 53 open-spec, community backed SBCs that run Linux and/or Android. Please take a few minutes to fill out our short SurveyMonkey SBC Survey, and select your favorite SBCs, then enter a drawing to become one of 20 randomly chosen participants who receive a free Linux SBC. Farther below, we offer brief summaries of the 53 boards, with links to product pages.

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How Design Philosophy Influences GNOME and KDE

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux desktop users have two main sets of utilities: KDE's and GNOME's. The GNOME utilities are found in GNOME, MATE, Cinnamon and Unity. Neither KDE nor GNOME has any objective advantage over the other, but the user experiences are so different that they could almost be two different operating systems.

Both utility sets have the same basic features, but each starts with its own concept of what users want. As I have said before, GNOME's utilities are exercises in minimalism, generally designed only for the most common use cases. By contrast, KDE's utilities are completist, typically cramming every possibly related feature into their windows, as well as every possible opportunity for customization.

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Also: GNOME's WebKitGTK+ Reaches Version 2.4.9 with HiDPI Support

LFA (Linux For ALL) Distro Is Now Based on Ubuntu 15.04 and Debian 8 Jessie

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

Arne Exton, the creator of several distributions of GNU/Linux and Android-x86 Live CDs, has updated his LFA (Linux For ALL) distribution recently with a new, custom kernel package and various under-the-hood improvements.

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Canonical Patches Four Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

On May 20, Canonical published a new Ubuntu security notice where they've informed users about the immediate availability of a new kernel update for its Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system.

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Also: Canonical Fixes Linux Kernel Vulnerability in Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin)

TrackingPoint, the Linux-powered rifle manufacturer, may be bankrupt

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Linux

When TrackingPoint first showcased its Linux-powered scopes with tracking assistance that substantially improved rifle accuracy, even in the hands of untrained hunters, it kicked off a controversy over what level of technology was appropriate for hunting or home defense, and whether the company encouraged irresponsible behavior. Now, it seems that debate is coming to an end thanks to imminent financial failure. While the company’s website remains online for now, there’s a new header that notes: “Due to financial difficulty, TrackingPoint will no longer be accepting orders. Thank you to our customers and loyal followers for sharing our vision.”

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Security News

Filed under
Linux
Security
  • Oracle Patches the Venom Security Issue in All Supported VirtualBox Branches
  • Is SELinux good anti-venom?

    Dan Berrange, creator of libvirt, sums it up nicely on the Fedora Devel list:

    "While you might be able to crash the QEMU process associated with your own guest, you should not be able to escalate from there to take over the host, nor be able to compromise other guests on the same host. The attacker would need to find a second independent security flaw to let them escape SELinux in some manner, or some way to trick libvirt via its QEMU monitor connection. Nothing is guaranteed 100% foolproof, but in absence of other known bugs, sVirt provides good anti-venom for this flaw IMHO."

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • DDoS reflection attacks are back – and this time, it's personal

    At the start of 2014, attackers' favorite distributed denial of service attack strategy was to send messages to misconfigured servers with a spoofed return address – the servers would keep trying to reply to those messages, allowing the attackers to magnify the impact of their traffic.

  • Another HTTPS Vulnerability Rattles The Internet

    Another HTTPS vulnerability has started to make its rounds earlier this morning. Dubbed Logjam by its researchers, the vulnerability stems from the US's encryption export mandate back in the 1990s. This particular vulnerability, in the transport-layer security layer protocol, breaks the Diffie-Hellman perfect forward-secrecy. Susceptibility to the vulnerability is depended on servers and clients supporting the DHE_EXPORT encryption scheme, or using a key less-than-or-equal to 1024 bits.

Linux Containers: A new IaaS opportunity?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux containers have been around for several years, but have come back into vogue recently with the growing popularity of Docker containers.

Docker containers launched with the aim of making it easy for developers to test and distribute applications and have taken off with a bang: Amazon, Google, Microsoft and Joyent have all announced ways to integrate and manage multiple Docker containers into their offerings.

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Initializing and Managing Services in Linux: Past, Present and Future

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Linux

One of the most crucial pieces of any UNIX-like operating system is the init dæmon process. In Linux, this process is started by the kernel, and it's the first userspace process to spawn and the last one to die during shutdown.

During the history of UNIX and Linux, many init systems have gained popularity and then faded away. In this article, I focus on the history of the init system as it relates to Linux, and I talk about the role of init in a modern Linux system. I also relate some of the history of the System V Init (SysV) scheme, which was the de facto standard for many Linux distributions for a long time. Then I cover a couple more modern approaches to system initialization, such as Upstart and systemd. Finally, I pay some attention to how things work in systemd, as this seems to be the popular choice at the moment for several of the largest distributions.

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Android Leftovers

Raspberry Pi 101 – An Introduction to the Raspberry Pi GPIO

An important feature of the Raspberry Pi is the row of GPIO pins, where GPIO stands for general purpose input/output. It will allow us to communicate between Pi and the outside world. We have 40pins on Pi, we count these pins from left to right out of which seventeen pins are GPIO pins. Different pins are used for the different functions and can be connected to a number of external peripherals such as buttons, lights, relays, sensors, etc. Read more

Intel Pentium vs. AMD Ryzen 3 Performance For Linux Gaming

For those that may be looking to assemble a new low-end Linux gaming system in early 2018, here is a look at the Linux gaming performance of an Intel Pentium (Kabylake) processor to an AMD Ryzen 3 while testing with the GeForce GTX 1050 and Radeon RX 560 graphics cards. Read more

Containers, the GPL, and copyleft: No reason for concern

Though open source is thoroughly mainstream, new software technologies and old technologies that get newly popularized sometimes inspire hand-wringing about open source licenses. Most often the concern is about the GNU General Public License (GPL), and specifically the scope of its copyleft requirement, which is often described (somewhat misleadingly) as the GPL’s derivative work issue. One imperfect way of framing the question is whether GPL-licensed code, when combined in some sense with proprietary code, forms a single modified work such that the proprietary code could be interpreted as being subject to the terms of the GPL. While we haven’t yet seen much of that concern directed to Linux containers, we expect more questions to be raised as adoption of containers continues to grow. But it’s fairly straightforward to show that containers do not raise new or concerning GPL scope issues. Read more