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Linux

Create a game with Scratch on Raspberry Pi

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming
HowTos

While Scratch may seem like a very simplistic programming language that’s just for kids, you’d be wrong to overlook it as an excellent first step into coding for all age levels. One aspect of learning to code is understanding the underlying logic that makes up all programs; comparing two systems, learning to work with loops and general decision-making within the code.

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Did Blue Pup jump the shark with its Windows 8 Metro interface?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

When Windows 8 was first released many people were shocked and even horrified by the garish Metro interface. Some even left Windows for Linux or shifted back to Windows 7. Now you can experience some of the...er...magic of the Metro interface in the Blue Pup distro (a Puppy Linux spin), according to LinuxInsider.

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Linux Becoming a ‘First Class Member’ of the Unreal Engine Family

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Unreal Engine developers Epic Games hope to make Linux a “first class member” of the Unreal Engine family for both gamers and developers.

While Unreal Tournament’s return to Linux was good news for gamers, developers could’ve been left with subpar tooling that would make it harder for indie developers and large game studios alike to justify the effort to adapt their complex workflows to our favourite OS.

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How FOSS Brought New Life To My Once Linux-Unfriendly Laptop

Filed under
Linux

Many of you can probably relate to this: that machine, whether it be a laptop or a desktop computer, that just seems to hate any Linux operating system you throw at it. Poor performance, inefficiency or non-working bits of hardware or functionalities seem the norm whenever you try your favourite Linux distro on it to the point where you reluctantly accept this machine may only ever be usable on it's factory installed OS (often Windows, of course). I too had this experience but it turns out sometimes a little patience and the fast moving nature of FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) can turn things around.

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Linux-based eyewear tracks eye movements

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Tobii announced a Linux-based eyewear device with advanced eye-tracking software that lets market researchers see what’s capturing the viewer’s attention.

At first glance, Tobii Glasses 2 may look like another Google Glass competitor, but there’s more — and less — here than meets the eye. First, this is not a casual date: the glasses cost a whopping $14,900, and the Premium Analytics package goes for $29,900. Second, the eyewear is not designed for snapping photos of checking the Internet on the move. Instead, it lets researchers see what is captivating a test subject’s interest. The device can be used to watch what you’re looking at on a website, a TV screen, or signage, or when walking into a store or restaurant. They can analyze how you drive a car, train on equipment, or even play sports.

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Test driving NVIDIA GRID Workspace (Windows client). Linux client is in the works

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

NVIDIA GRID Workspace is a virtualized desktop environment from NVIDIA that offers “cloud-delivered graphics acceleration for enterprise applications.” The NVIDIA GRID Windows client was released yesterday for a limited time only. Linux and Mac OS X are said to be in the works, so while I’m waiting for the Linux client to be released, I decided to test-drive the Windows client on an installation of Windows 7 Pro in a (VirtualBox) virtual environment.

Yes, that’s running a virtual desktop on a virtual desktop. I didn’t know how responsive the system will be, especially when I allocated only 1.3 GB of RAM to Windows 7 and it did not have hardware acceleration enabled.

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With Valve On Linux, Has LGP Lost All Relevance?

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Most Linux gamers don't want to spend $30+ USD for some game that's several years old where they may already own the Linux copy, they could buy the Windows copy for just a few dollars, and where it runs fine under Wine/CrossOver software. With Valve on Linux, we'll be getting fresh games and if you have the game already on Mac OS X or Windows, it should be available from the Steam Linux client (assuming it's been ported to Linux).

The old titles from LGP also aren't anything that were even really compelling when originally released, with most Windows gamers likely never even having heard of them, like Gorky 17, Hyperspace Delivery Boy, and Gorky 17. The few worthwhile games out of Linux Game Publishing were Shadowgrounds, X2/X3, Postal II, and Cold War.

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Netrunner 14 RC1 Is Based on Kubuntu 14.04 LTS, but It Looks Much Better

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Netrunner 14 RC1, a GNU/Linux distribution based on Kubuntu 14.04 LTS, featuring KDE as the default desktop environment and integrating many GNOME/GTK+ programs to make it Ubuntu-compatible, has been released and is now available for testing.

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AMD “Bald Eagle” APUs target high-end embedded Linux

Filed under
Linux
Server
Hardware

AMD’s “Bald Eagle” R-Series processors offer four 3.6GHz “Steamroller” cores with Heterogeneous System Architecture support, plus Mentor Embedded Linux.

AMD has a dual-platform strategy for embedded: G-Series on the low end and R-Series on the high end. Now, the chipmaker has launched a second generation of AMD Embedded R-series processors in both CPU and APU (accelerated processing unit) variants, with the latter offering integrated, rather than optional discrete AMD Radeon graphics. AMD tipped its Bald Eagle R-Series processors last September, and has launched sales for five new variants. The new R-Series CPUs are designed for gaming machines, digital signage, medical imaging, industrial control and automation, and communications and networking infrastructure, says AMD.

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Browsers will Flash Linux into the future or drag it into the past

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

The announcement has gone out. The gist? Flash will no longer work with Chromium on Linux. Many of you are probably wondering, "What is Chromium?" Essentially, Chromium is the open-source version of Google's massively popular browser, Chrome. The big Flash debacle is simple: the old way of handling Flash (within a browser) is insecure. It was driven by the Netscape Plugin API (NPAPI) -- an architecture that dates back to Netscape Navigator 2.0. NPAI that's insecure, obsolete, and doesn't work well on smartphones and tablets -- which is a death knell in and of itself.

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