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Breaking: Netflix now runs on Linux without tweaks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

Netflix now runs on Linux without any tweaks or work-around what so ever. I just noticed it when I installed a new Ubuntu system (14.10), with Chrome Beta 39.x and out of curiosity opened Netflix. It worked flawlessly. No agent switcher required anymore

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Fedora 21 Alpha Release Has Three Flavors

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

Over at the Fedora Project, we recently released the alpha version of Fedora 21. (And if the rest of this is all tl;dr, no problem – skip right to the pre-release download page, and there you are.)

Looking for a silly code name like in previous years? Sorry to disappoint – this is the first release to be just called by its number. That's not all we're doing differently, though. Last year, Fedora reached its 10-year anniversary, and as went into our second decade, we decided to take a step back and reflect on what changes it will take to continue to be a leading Free and Open Source Linux distribution over the next ten years.

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How the open-source community should respond to Adobe pulling Linux support

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

So, what's the big deal? Adobe has clearly shown it has zero interest in supporting our platform of choice. This is not new news. In fact, Reader hadn't been updated for Linux since May, 2013. And what about the rest of Adobe products? Need I say more? And Reader for Linux has been in a pathetic state for a long time (even the Windows version is a mess). There are also other, better alternatives for Linux (such as Evince and Ocular).

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The Limitations Of Wayland On Fedora 21

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat

Following last month's release of Fedora 21 Alpha I played around with the GNOME Wayland session and shared my thoughts and ran some XWayland benchmarks. The Fedora Project Magazine has also now put the Fedora 21 gnome-session-wayland-session through its paces and delivered a brief write-up. In their write-up they cover a partial list of applications known to break under Wayland some shortcomings. They also do a brief overview of the Wayland architecture and other facts, if you've been living under a rock the past few years, or just not reading enough Phoronix.

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Want A Mac OS Look With Linux Power? Have It All With Zukimac, A GTK Theme

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac
GNOME

One of the great benefits of Linux is that you can customize it however you’d like. And while some customizations can be completely unique, others can be oddly familiar to other operating systems. We’ve already shown you how you can make a Lubuntu installation look like Windows XP.

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No interest in Poettering's problems, says Torvalds

Filed under
Linux

Linux creator Linus Torvalds has indicated that he has no interest in the problems faced by chief systemd developer Lennart Poettering that led to the latter blaming Torvalds for the negative feedback he (Poettering) has faced.

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Also: Systemd backlash: Poettering blames Linus Torvalds

Systemd developer and Red Hat employee Lennart Poettering has taken aim at Linux creator Linus Torvalds in a rant on his blog, in which he blames Torvalds for the extent of enmity directed at him (Poettering).

In a long, rambling outburst, Poettering, who is well known for being precious, has squarely put the blame for the negative feedback he has received - which, he claims, extended to death threats - "on a certain circle of folks that play a major role in kernel development, and first and foremost Linus Torvalds himself".

[...]

Despite all his justifications, Poettering comes across as a cry-baby. And he has not heard of the old saying that people in glass houses should not throw stones. He has had plenty of memorable things to say on mailing lists himself. He appears to think he is without fault.

SparkyLinux 3.5.1 E19 is out

Filed under
GNU
Linux

SparkyLinux 3.5.1 “Annagerman” Enlightenment 19 is ready to go.

Not so long ago, just three years I started my adventure with Enlightenment and Ubuntu.
At the beginning the name of the system was ue17r (Ubuntu E17 Remix) and it was far away from the current version of SparkyLinux. ue17r was a kind of experiment and I was trying to prove (myself) that a man such me, non-programmer, is able to do something what theoretically shouldn’t does.

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What's CoreOS? An existential threat to Linux vendors

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Linux Foundation Expands International Membership

Filed under
Linux

Altera, Chelsio Communications, DataCentred, Imagination Technologies, and Travelping Are Latest Companies to Support Linux

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Phoronix on AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • AMD's Carrizo Gets Temperature Monitoring On Linux

    The Linux 3.18 kernel will bring support for reading the core temperature of AMD's forthcoming "Carrizo" APUs.

  • New ARM Hardware Support For Linux 3.18 Kernel

    New ARM platform coverage with this next major Linux kernel series include support for the SAMA5D4, BCM63XX family of DSL SOCs, the HiP04 server-class SoC, Amlogic Meson6 (8726MX) platform support, and support for the R-Car E2 r8a7794 SoC. The Atmel SAMA5D4 is an ARM Cortex-A5 based design, the BCM63XX has been known to OpenWRT fans, the Hisilicon HiP04 was enabled by the Linaro crew, and the r8a7794 is an automotive-geared SoC.

  • A Look Back: When Everyone Had Problems With ATI/AMD On Linux

    If you go back more than seven years ago, lots of people took easy aim at the state of ATI/AMD's Linux graphics drivers. Back then, they didn't even have an open-source strategy... How times have changed.

  • AMD Has A CEO Shake-Up Again
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming