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Linux

Netrunner 13.12 released

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Linux

The Netrunner Team is proud to release Netrunner 13.12 – 32bit and 64bit stable.

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Tiny ARM9 box-PC adds wireless options

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Linux

Artila Electronics announced a tiny control computer running Linux on ARM9, and featuring mini-PCIe sockets for options including WiFi, Bluetooth, cellular, and GPS.

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Apache Foundation and Linux Foundation join forces for ApacheCon

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Linux

No, it's not a joke. The Linux Foundation has joined forces with the Apache Software Foundation, the grandfather of open-source development groups, to help run ApacheCon.

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DA223 HQL: Acer’s all-in-one Android PC has a Snapdragon 600 inside

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Linux

The DA223 HQL is the newest Android all-in-one computer announced at the just-concluded 2014 edition of the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada.

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Homemade Raspberry Pi tablet, PiPad, with wood finish and Linux OS will set your sweet tooth tingling

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Linux

Meet the Raspberry Pi tablet, named PiPad by its owner and creator Michael Castor.

The tablet was built by maker-enthusiast Castor as a Maker Faire project. He used a 12V, 10-inch touchscreen with a 5V HDMI to LVDS adapter, since the Raspberry Pi runs off 5V. He also managed to squeeze in a 10,000mAh battery that gives a good six hours of use.

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Steam Dev Days show plan for Valve-owned future, and Microsoft should be terrified

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Linux
Microsoft

It's also another data point that suggests 2014 could be a big year for virtual reality. Developers have put out games and demos that operate in virtual reality since the release of the Oculus Rift development kit, but there are few tools available to launch each game without taking off the headset and interacting with a standard screen. User interface, the place you spend your time between games, is an unsolved problem.

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Canonical posts a $21 million loss – is Ubuntu’s future doomed?

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Linux
Ubuntu

The financial result for the Ubuntu maker is out. The company posted a loss of $21.3 million in fiscal year 2013, a straight fall of $10.2 million from the loss posted in fiscal year 2012, which was $11.1 million. The revenue earned in 2013 however, was $65.7 million, up from $56.8 million reported a year earlier.

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What I Saw on the CES Show Floor: Your Work on Display

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Linux

From 3D printers to drones, phones, tablets, TVs and even crockpots, Linux is running almost everything on display on the CES show floor. One of my favorite picks is Makerbot. These Linux-based 3D printers are creating everything from mechanical hands to clothing to dinosaur skulls. Originally introduced at SXSW with the founders hanging out in bars around Austin making shot glasses with their printers, this company was white hot this week at CES. It introduced three new printers, a digital store that is being referred to as the iTunes of 3D printing and a variety of new apps. All built on Linux.

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Non-Linux FOSS: Persistence of Vision Raytracer (POV-Ray)

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Linux

Back in the mid-1990s, a college friend (hi Russ!) and I would put our old 8088 computers to work rendering ray-traced images for days—literally. The end result would be, by today's standards, incredibly low resolution and not terribly interesting. Still, the thought of a computer system creating realistic photos from nothing more than math equations was fascinating. As you probably already guessed, Russ and I weren't terribly popular.

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Red Hat Academy Expands Training, Includes OpenStack Coursework

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Linux

While many people are familiar with Red Hat's experience and expertise at providing support for open source software, the company has also been diving deeper into training and education. As just one example, the company recently announced its Red Hat Certificate of Expertise in Infrastructure-as-a-Service and expanded training in support of its OpenStack technology.

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More in Tux Machines

FOSS Events: LCA and systemd.conf

  • 5 great linux.conf.au talks (that aren't about Linux)
    linux.conf.au, otherwise known as LCA, is one of the world's longest-running open source events. LCA has been held in a different city around Australia and New Zealand almost every year since 1999. Despite the name, linux.conf.au is a generalist open source conference. LCA hasn't been just about Linux for a long time. Rather, the conference focuses on everything to do with open source: the software, hardware, and network protocols that underly it. LCA also has a strong track on free and open culture, exploring how open source interacts with science, government, and the law.
  • FINAL REMINDER! systemd.conf 2016 CfP Ends on Monday!
    Please note that the systemd.conf 2016 Call for Participation ends on Monday, on Aug. 1st! Please send in your talk proposal by then! We’ve already got a good number of excellent submissions, but we are very interested in yours, too!

OSS Leftovers

Programming

Security News

  • Security advisories for Thursday
  • Please save GMane!
  • The End of Gmane?
    In 2002, I grew annoyed with not finding the obscure technical information I was looking for, so I started Gmane, the mailing list archive. All technical discussion took place on mailing lists those days, and archiving those were, at best, spotty and with horrible web interfaces. The past few weeks, the Gmane machines (and more importantly, the company I work for, who are graciously hosting the servers) have been the target of a number of distributed denial of service attacks. Our upstream have been good about helping us filter out the DDoS traffic, but it’s meant serious downtime where we’ve been completely off the Internet.
  • Pwnie Express makes IoT, Android security arsenal open source
    Pwnie Express has given the keys to software used to secure the Internet of Things (IoT) and Android software to the open-source community. The Internet of Things (IoT), the emergence of devices ranging from lighting to fridges and embedded systems which are connected to the web, has paved an avenue for cyberattackers to exploit.
  • The Software Supply Chain Is Bedeviled by Bad Open-Source Code [Ed: again, trace this back to FUD firms like Sonatype in this case]
    Open-source components play a key role in the software supply chain. By reducing the amount of code that development organizations need to write, open source enables companies to deliver software more efficiently — but not without significant risks, including defective and outdated components and security vulnerabilities.
  • Securing a Virtual World [Ed: paywall, undated (no year but reposted)]
  • Google tells Android's Linux kernel to toughen up and fight off those horrible hacker bullies
    In a blog post, Jeff Vander Stoep of the mobile operating system's security team said that in the next build of the OS, named Nougat, Google is going to be addressing two key areas of the Linux kernel that reside at the heart of most of the world's smartphones: memory protection and reducing areas available for attack by hackers.