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Voice boards run Linux on Cortex-A35 based RK3308

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Linux

Hangzhou Wild Chip Tech has launched two open-spec “MDK3308” dev kits with 6-mic arrays that extend a Linux-driven “Mcuzone MDK3308 Coreboard” module running a quad -A35 Rockchip RK3308.

Over on AliExpress, there’s a new Mcuzone MDK3308 Coreboard module featuring a Cortex-A35 based Rockchip RK3308 SoC. The Mcuzone MDK3308 Coreboard sells for $23 (256MB RAM) or $26 (512MB) with 256MB NAND flash and 8GB eMMC. The module is also available in two open-spec, sandwich-style evaluation kits starting at $35.

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Canonical's Linux Snap Store Adds 10 Distro-Specific Installation Pages For Every App

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Linux
Ubuntu

Canonical's Snap Store -- a fairly distro-agnostic solution for easily installing a wide variety of apps -- is loaded up and ready to go in Linux distributions like Zorin OS and Ubuntu. It's also supported on dozens of others including Arch, Linux Mint, Manjaro and elementary OS, provided you install the Snapd service first. Now it looks like Canonical is striving to make the entire experience more user-friendly by serving up distro-specific landing pages for every single app in the Snap Store.

They look pretty slick, too.

For example, if you want to install something like Telegram, the Snap Store is ready to serve up a unique page, complete with an appropriately colored and logo-laden background explaining how to install both the required Snapd service and the app for the distro you're using. In the screenshot below, you'll notice commands to pull Snapd from the AUR (Arch User Repository), enable the service and then install Telegram Desktop.

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Nebra AnyBeam: A Raspberry Pi powered home cinema projector you can fit in your pocket [Review]

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Linux
Reviews

Before large screen televisions and 4K content became a thing, I used to enjoy watching films projected onto a white wall at home. I had a Canon projector hooked up to my PC with surround sound, and it was like having a personal cinema.

Technology has moved on quite some way since then, and you can now buy reasonable quality projectors for a fraction of the price. Case in point is Nebra AnyBeam, a Raspberry Pi powered pocket sized projector.

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Use Albert Launcher On Linux To Boost Your Productivity

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GNU
Linux

Albert is a productivity app inspired by Quicksilver, Alfred and other similar tools, that runs on Linux. Written in C++ / Qt5, this free and open source launcher uses a plugin-based architecture that makes it very flexible and powerful.

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GNU/Linux on Chrome OS and on Lenovo's 2019 ThinkPad P Series

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GNU
Linux
Google
Ubuntu
  • Best Linux-Centric File Managers for Chrome OS

    I recently covered how to install Linux on Chromebook and you can check it out here. Today, let’s divert our attention to the File Manager in Chrome OS.

    Chrome OS is a beautiful Operating System (as is expected of all Google products) and it houses a responsive file manager for navigating its file trees.

    While it works excellently on Chrome OS which it was designed for, navigating Linux directories with it doesn’t feel as “Linuxy” and it can be helpful to install a Linux-centric file manager to eliminate that need.

  • Proposed Chrome OS 78 change will use the Files app to restore Linux containers on Chromebooks

    Chrome OS 74 brought the ability to backup and restore Linux containers on a Chromebook. It’s handy and it works. However, to use it, you have to go to the Linux settings in Chrome OS, which isn’t ideal.

  • Lenovo's 2019 ThinkPad P Series Lineup: OLED, RTX Quadro, Ubuntu, and More

    All P Series mobile workstations can also be configured with either Windows (up to Windows 10 Pro) or Ubuntu, making these a powerful mobile option for Linux users.

Banana Pi M4 launches for $38 with M.2, 40-pin, and PoE

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Linux
Hardware

SinoVoip has launched its previously revealed “Banana Pi BPI-M4” SBC for $38. The Raspberry Pi-like board runs Linux on a quad -A53 Realtek RTD1395 and offers HDMI, M.2, WiFi/BT, 40-pin GPIO, PoE, and 5x USB ports.

When SinoVoip announced its Banana Pi BPI-M4 in February, it suggested the board would be coming soon. As it turned out, four months have passed, but the BPI-M4 is now available for $38 with 1GB RAM and 8GB eMMC on AliExpress.

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Also: Mini Type 10 and Compact Type 6 modules tap Apollo Lake

System76's supercharged Linux-powered Gazelle laptop is finally available

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Linux

Today is Thursday, which is one of the worst days of the week. I mean, I suppose it is better than Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, but it can't hold a candle to Friday, Saturday, or Sunday -- otherwise known as the weekend. So, yeah, Thursday is typically not something to get excited about.

With all of that said, today is a pretty special Thursday for the Linux community. Why? Well, the System76 Gazelle laptop is finally available! This is a laptop we reported on last month, and at the time, System76 only promised it would be available in June 2019. Well, June 13 of 2019 is apparently the exact day it goes on sale, as you can get it now.

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Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 is Available Now

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Linux

The famous Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL2) begins roll out via Windows Insider previews.

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4-channel temp measurement HAT can be stacked eight high per Pi

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Linux

MCC has released a stackable, $149 “MCC 134 Thermocouple Measurement HAT” for the Raspberry Pi with 4x isolated, 24-bit thermocouple inputs and a thermocouple detection feature.

Measurement Computing Corp. (MCC) has launched its third DAQ HAT for the Raspberry Pi, this time taking on temperature measurement. The $149 MCC 134 Thermocouple Measurement HAT follows its MCC 118 voltage measurement DAQ HAT with eight ±10 V inputs and sample rates up to 100 kS/s and its MCC 152 voltage output and digital I/O HAT with dual 0-5 V analog outputs at up to 5 kS/s and 8x configurable DIO.

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Kernel: Nouveau, ACRN, and RADV Vulkan Driver

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Linux
  • Linux Kernel Set To Expose Hidden NVIDIA HDA Controllers, Helping Laptop Users

    If you are a user of the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" Linux graphics driver on laptops and have found no audio support, that is likely to be fixed by an upcoming kernel patch that should make its way to the Linux 5.3 kernel.

    Modern NVIDIA GPUs have an onboard HDA controller but primarily in the case of recent notebooks, they tend to be hidden -- depending upon a bit in the GPU configuration space it's possible to "hide" the controller. When it's hidden, the controller won't get initialized and you'll lose out on functionality like HDMI audio.

  • Linux 5.3 Kernel Picking Up Support For ACRN Guest Hypervisor Support

    The Linux 5.3 mainline kernel will be picking up support for enabling Linux guests on the ACRN hypervisor.

    ACRN is the lightweight hypervisor announced by Intel last year during the Embedded Linux Conference. ACRN is a lightweight hypervisor focused on real-time and safety-critical workloads and optimized with IoT deployments in mind. Those unfamiliar with ACRN can learn more at ProjectACRN.org.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Picks Up Fixes For Vega M Hardware

    While Vega M has been on the market for several months as the Radeon graphics processor found on Intel Kabylake-G chips, interestingly in the past few days have been a number of improvements for using the open-source Linux graphics stack on this hardware.

    A few days ago I reported on Vega M support coming to the ROCm compute stack. The latest improvement now for Vega M with Linux graphics are some practical RADV Radeon Vulkan driver fixes.

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More in Tux Machines

AMD Releases Firmware Update To Address SEV Vulnerability

A new security vulnerability has been made public over AMD's Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV) having insecure cryptographic implementations. Fortunately, this AMD SEV issue is addressed by a firmware update. CVE-2019-9836 has been made pulic as the AMD Secure Processor / Secure Encrypted Virtualization having an insecure cryptographic implementation. Read more

today's howtos and programming bits

  • How to get the latest Wine on Linux Mint 19
  • How to Install KDE Plasma in Arch Linux (Guide)
  • 0 bytes left

    Around 2003–2004, a friend and I wrote a softsynth that was used in a 64 kB intro. Now, 14 years later, cTrix and Pselodux picked it up and made a really cool 32 kB tune with it! Who would have thought.

  • A month full of learning with Gnome-GSoC

    In this month I was able to work with Libgit2-glib where Albfan mentored me on how to port functions from Libgit2 to Libgit2-glib. Libgit2-glib now has functionality to compare two-buffers. This feature I think can now benefit other projects also which requires diff from buffers, for example Builder for it’s diff-view and gedit.

  • Google Developers Are Looking At Creating A New libc For LLVM

    As part of Google's consolidating their different toolchains around LLVM, they are exploring the possibility of writing a new C library "libc" implementation.  Google is looking to develop a new C standard library within LLVM that will better suit their use-cases and likely others within the community too. 

  • How We Made Conda Faster in 4.7

    We’ve witnessed a lot of community grumbling about Conda’s speed, and we’ve experienced it ourselves. Thanks to a contract from NASA via the SBIR program, we’ve been able to dedicate a lot of time recently to optimizing Conda.  We’d like to take this opportunity to discuss what we did, and what we think is left to do.

  • TensorFlow CPU optimizations in Anaconda

    By Stan Seibert, Anaconda, Inc. & Nathan Greeneltch, Intel Corporation TensorFlow is one of the most commonly used frameworks for large-scale machine learning, especially deep learning (we’ll call it “DL” for short). This popular framework has been increasingly used to solve a variety of complex research, business and social problems. Since 2016, Intel and Google have worked together to optimize TensorFlow for DL training and inference speed performance on CPUs. The Anaconda Distribution has included this CPU-optimized TensorFlow as the default for the past several TensorFlow releases. Performance optimizations for CPUs are provided by both software-layer graph optimizations and hardware-specific code paths. In particular, the software-layer graph optimizations use the Intel Math Kernel Library for Deep Neural Networks (Intel MKL-DNN), an open source performance library for DL applications on Intel architecture. Hardware specific code paths are further accelerated with advanced x86 processor instruction set, specifically, Intel Advanced Vector Extensions 512 (Intel AVX-512) and new instructions found in the Intel Deep Learning Boost (Intel DL Boost) feature on 2nd generation Intel Xeon Scalable processors. Let’s take a closer look at both optimization approaches and how to get these accelerations from Anaconda.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #374 (June 25, 2019)

VIdeo/Audio: Linux in the Ham Shack, How to install OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 and "Debian Package of the Day"

  • LHS Episode #290: Where the Wild Things Are

    Welcome to Episode 290 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this short format show, the hosts discuss the recent ARRL Field Day, LIDs getting theirs, vandalism in Oregon, a Canonical flip-flop, satellite reception with SDR and much more. Thank you for tuning in and we hope you have a wonderful week.

  • How to install OpenMandriva Lx 4.0

    In this video, I am going to show how to Install OpenMandriva Lx 4.0.

  • Jonathan Carter: PeerTube and LBRY

    I have many problems with YouTube, who doesn’t these days, right? I’m not going to go into all the nitty gritty of it in this post, but here’s a video from a LBRY advocate that does a good job of summarizing some of the issues by using clips from YouTube creators: I have a channel on YouTube for which I have lots of plans for. I started making videos last year and created 59 episodes for Debian Package of the Day. I’m proud that I got so far because I tend to lose interest in things after I figure out how it works or how to do it. I suppose some people have assumed that my video channel is dead because I haven’t uploaded recently, but I’ve just been really busy and in recent weeks, also a bit tired as a result. Things should pick up again soon.

Games: Steam Summer Sale, Last Moon, Ubuntu-Valve-Canonical Faceoff

  • Steam Summer Sale 2019 is live, here’s what to look out for Linux fans

    Another year, another massive sale is now live on Steam. Let’s take a look at what Valve are doing this year and what you should be looking out for. This time around, Valve aren’t doing any special trading cards. They’re trying something a little different! You will be entering the "Steam Grand Prix" by joining a team (go team Hare!), earning points for rewards and having a shot at winning some free games in the process. Sounds like a good bit of fun, the specific-game challenges are a nice touch.

  • Last Moon, a 2D action-RPG with a gorgeous vibrant style will be coming to Linux next year

    Sköll Studio managed to capture my attention recently, with some early footage of their action-RPG 'Last Moon' popping up in my feed and it looks gorgeous. Taking inspiration from classics like Legend of Zelda: A link to the past, Secret of Mana, Chrono Trigger and a ton more you can see it quite clearly. Last Moon takes in place in a once peaceful kingdom, where an ancient and powerful mage put a curse on the moon, as Lunar Knight you need to stop all this insanity and bring back peace.

  • Ubuntu Takes A U-Turn with 32-Bit Support

    Canonical will continue to support legacy applications and libraries. Canonical, the maker of the world’s most popular Linux-based distribution Ubuntu, has revived support for 32-bit libraries after feedback from WINE, Ubuntu Studio and Steam communities. Last week Canonical announced that its engineering teams decided that Ubuntu should not continue to carry i386 forward as an architecture. “Consequently, i386 will not be included as an architecture for the 19.10 release, and we will shortly begin the process of disabling it for the eoan series across Ubuntu infrastructure,” wrote Will Cooke, Director of Ubuntu Desktop at Canonical.

  • Steam and Ubuntu clash over 32-bit libs

    It has been a tumultuous week for gaming on Linux. Last Tuesday afternoon, Canonical's Steve Langasek announced that 32-bit libs would be frozen (kept as-is, with no new builds or updates) as of this October's interim 19.10 release, codenamed "Eoan Ermine." Langasek was pretty clear that this did not mean abandoning support for running 32-bit applications, however.

  • Linux gamers take note: Steam won’t support the next version of Ubuntu

    Valve has announced that from the next version of Ubuntu (19.10), it will no longer support Steam on Ubuntu, the most popular flavor of Linux, due to the distro dropping support for 32-bit packages, This all kicked off when Canonical, developer of Ubuntu, announced that it was seemingly completely dropping support for 32-bit in Ubuntu 19.10. However, following a major outcry, a further clarification (or indeed, change of heart) came from the firm stating that there will actually be limited support for 32-bit going forward (although updates for 32-bit libraries will no longer be delivered, effectively leaving them in a frozen state).

  • Valve killing Steam Support for some Ubuntu users

    A few years ago the announcement that Steam would begin supporting Linux was a big deal: it meant that anyone who preferred to rock an open-source operating system over Mac OS or Windows 10 would have instant buy-it-and-play-it access to a large catalog of game titles that would have otherwise taken a whole lot of tweaking to get up and running or wouldn't have worked for them at all. For some, at least, the party may be coming to an end.

  • Steam is dropping support for Ubuntu, but not Linux entirely

    The availability of Steam on Linux has been a boom for gaming on the platform, especially with the recent addition of the Steam Play compatibility layer for running Windows-only games. Valve has always recommended that gamers run Ubuntu Linux, the most popular desktop Linux distribution, but that's now changing.

  • Canonical (sort of) backtracks: Ubuntu will continue to support (some) 32-bit software

    A few days after announcing it would effectively drop support for 32-bit software in future versions of the Ubuntu operating system, Canonical has decided to “change our plan and build selected 32-bit i386 packages.” The company’s original decision sparked some backlash when it became clear that some existing apps and games would no longer run on Ubuntu 19.10 if the change were to proceed as planned. Valve, for example, announced it would continue to support older versions of Ubuntu, allowing users to continue running its popular Steam game client. But moving forward, the company said it would be focusing its Steam for Linux efforts on a different GNU/Linux distribution.

  • Just kidding? Ubuntu 32-bit moving forward, no word yet from Valve

    Due in part to the feedback given to the group over the weekend and because of their connections with Valve, Canonical did an about-face today. They’ve suggested that feedback from gamers, Ubuntu Studio, and the WINE community led them to change their plan and will “build selected 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS. Whether this will change Valve’s future with Ubuntu Steam, we’ll see.

  • Canonical backtracks on 32-bit Ubuntu cull, but warns that on your head be it

    CANONICAL HAS CONFIRMED a U-Turn on the controversial decision to drop 32-bit support for Ubuntu users later this year. The company has faced criticism from users who aren't happy with the plan to make Ubuntu purely 64-bit, which culminated at the weekend with Steam announcing it would pull support for Ubuntu. Many Steam games were never made in 64-bit and it would, therefore, devalue the offer. However, Canonical confirmed on Monday that following feedback from the community, it was clear that there is still a demand, and indeed a need for 32-bit binaries, and as such, it will provide "selected" builds for both Ubuntu 19.10 and the forthcoming Ubuntu 20.04. Canonical's announcement spoke of the highly passionate arguments from those who are in favour of maintaining both versions, thus forcing the team to take notice. However, it has made it clear that it's doing so under the weight of expectation, not because it agrees. "There is a real risk to anybody who is running a body of software that gets little testing. The facts are that most 32-bit x86 packages are hardly used at all," the firm said.