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Microsoft-Friendly Media Prematurely Announces Death of GNU/Linux (Old Tactics) to Market Vista 10

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Kernel Space/Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Automotive Grade Linux Continues Rapid Growth

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative open source project developing a Linux-based, open platform for the connected car, today announced that six new members have joined Automotive Grade Linux and The Linux Foundation. DrimAES joins AGL at the Silver level while ARM, Elektrobit, RealVNC, Telenav and Tuxera join AGL at the Bronze level.

  • Why Microsoft Won’t Use the Linux Kernel for Windows

    There are a number of reasons why Microsoft won’t use the Linux kernel for Windows. For one there is a huge difference in the technical aspects of the Linux Kernel and the NT kernel.

    Another reason would be the issues of licensing involved if Microsoft has to switch over to using the Linux kernel for windows. Thirdly, there are things done on Windows that can’t be done on any other operating system.

  • Linux Enhanced BPF (eBPF) Tracing Tools

    This page shows examples of performance analysis tools using enhancements to BPF (Berkeley Packet Filter) which were added to the Linux 4.x series kernels, allowing BPF to do much more than just filtering packets. These enhancements allow custom analysis programs to be executed on Linux dynamic tracing, static tracing, and profiling events.

  • Mesa 17.0.0 Released

    It’s been a busy few week for Mesa related news, and today is no exception as Mesa 17.0 is now officially available. Mesa 17.0.0 is the first release with the new year-based versioning system (it would’ve been Mesa 13.1.0 otherwise).

Phones: Fake News, Tizen, and Android Lawsuit

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Android
Linux
  • Of iPhones and Fake News - We have rare opportunity to discover bastard lying deceptive journalists and writers in tech

    The past week had a rare ‘perfect test’ for any tech reader, to evaluate most tech writers they follow. It was a test of journalistic integrity (and of competence, and possibly of deliberate intent to deceive you, the reader).

    This is the test. Did your writer report about iPhone latest Quarter sales data, vs Samsung’s Galaxy series of smartphones, correctly and honestly, or did your writer try to mislead you. Were you actually a victim of ‘Fake News’ (as many US voters were when voting for Donald Trump). This is really a simple test and it will tell you categorically, is you preferred tech writer honest and fair, or is the writer biased and peddling fake news at you.

  • Smartphone Game: PaperFlick in Tizen Store for Samsung Z1, Z2 and Z3

    PaperFlick is a game much like Paper Toss, which is a game that is already on the Android and IOS platforms. This game is just like it but you can’t change what you throw into the bin, but I hope in future updates that the developer will add that feature. Basically, what you have is a paper ball and you have to throw it in the bin, but it isn’t that easy. In paperflick, the fan will blow the ball in a different direction and away from the bin so you don’t get any points. You need to throw the paper ball at the right angle to get it in the bin.

  • Oracle Files Its Opening Brief As It Tries (Again) To Overturn Google's Fair Use Win On Java APIs

10 Best Linux Terminals For Ubuntu And Fedora

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Linux
Reviews

One of the most important applications for Linux users is the terminal emulator. It allows every user to get access to the shell. Bash is the most common shell for Linux and UNIX distributions, it’s powerful and very necessary for newbies and advanced users. So, in this article, you are going to know the great alternatives that you have to use an excellent terminal emulator.

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13 weird and wonderful niche Linux distros of 2017

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GNU
Linux

Fed up with the bog-standard Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora and so on? Looking for a distro that reflects your individuality? In this roundup we've discovered no less than 13 of the best, oddest and most useful distributions that Linux has to offer.

They include one distro which is the official, sanctioned OS of North Korea, no less, along with a Satanic Edition of Ubuntu (yes, you read that correctly), and also a distro which is so light it will run on a PC from the mid-80s.

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Also: Linux: The best distros for gaming?

[Older] 5 of the most popular Linux gaming distros

Meet The New Linux Desktop Environment Inspired by Windows 7

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

UKUI is developed by Ubuntu Kylin, the official Chinese-language spin of Ubuntu. It aims to provide ‘a simpler and more enjoyable experience for browsing, searching, and managing your computer’.

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Also: Ubuntu smart home platform for Raspberry Pi

The best Linux distributions for any purpose

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GNU
Linux

Whether it's for desktop, server or security, there's bound to be a Linux distro for you.

While it may not be as popular as Windows or MacOS, Linux is often the operating system of choice for those in the know. A combination of power and versatility has made Linux a firm favourite among developers and self-professed tech geeks over the years.

Contrary to popular belief, however, you don't need to be a programmer or a lifelong tech head to start using Linux. Most of the more popular distros are exceedingly easy to use, with heaps of documentation and guides available online. Best of all, Linux is classed as 'open source' software, meaning that it's completely free!

One brief disclaimer before we dive in; due to the nature of open source development, most of these distros are available in multiple different flavours - each of which will have various strengths and weaknesses. They'll all be broadly similar, but it's worth having a quick look at the specifics to decide which particular variant is best for you.

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Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Almost A Decade Later, RadeonHD Stories Still Coming To Light

    This September will mark 10 years since the public launch of the RadeonHD DDX driver (xf86-video-radeonhd) that was developed by SUSE during the Radeon X1000 and HD 2000/3000 days in conjunction with ATI/AMD. While we've talked about what started AMD's open-source strategy in the past and dozens of other RadeonHD articles, new stories are still coming to light.

  • R600/RadeonSI GLSL/TGSI On-Disk Shader Cache Revised

    Last week Collabora's Timothy Arceri posted TGSI shader cache patches for Mesa that so far benefit the R600g and RadeonSI Gallium3D drivers but could also help out the other Gallium3D drivers too. The second version of those patches have now been published.

  • RADV Gets More Improvements For Mesa 17.1-dev, Lower Dota 2 CPU Usage

    While Mesa 17.0 was just released, new feature development continues building up for Mesa 17.1.

    David Airlie landed a few more RADV patches into mainline Mesa Git. One of the changes is for detecting command buffers that don't do any work and then discard them. Airlie mentioned, "If a buffer is just full of flushes we flush things on command buffer submission, so don't bother submitting these. This will reduce some CPU overhead on dota2, which submits a fair few command streams that don't end up drawing anything.

  • Mesa 17.0 Officially Released with OpenGL 4.5 Capability for Intel Haswell, More

    Today is a great day for Linux gamers as Collabora's Emil Velikov proudly announced the general availability of the Mesa 17.0.0 3D Graphics Library for all GNU/Linux operating systems.

    Yes, Mesa 17, not Mesa 14, nor 15 or 16, as the development team has decided to skip them all and jump from the Mesa 13 series straight to version 17 according to a newly adopted versioning scheme based on the current year, something that will happen at the beginning of each new year.

  • Mesa 17.0.0 has officially released and it's well worth updating

    The Mesa developers have announced the release of Mesa 17.0.0 and it's a truly incredible release. You should probably update as soon as possible.

    For those that don't know what Mesa is: you will be using Mesa if you're on Intel graphics, most likely with an AMD GPU and also some older NVIDIA models. You are not using Mesa if you install AMD/NVIDIA proprietary drivers.

DEFT Zero (2017.1) ready for download

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We can finally announce that the stable version of DEFT Zero is available!
DEFT Zero is a light version of Deft specifically designed to the forensic acquisition of the digital evidence.

Among the biggest features: the support to NVMExpress memories (Mac Book ed. 2015), the eMMC memories and the UEFI support.
For the full list of new features please refer to the manual available by clicking on the link below.

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In the news: DEFT Linux Forensic Operating System Is Kicking Off 2017 with New Zero Edition

TheSSS 21.0 Live Linux Server OS Arrives with MariaDB 10.1.21 and Apache 2.4.25

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Linux

Softpedia was informed today by 4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki about the immediate availability of version 21.0 of his TheSSS (The Smallest Server Suite) Linux-based server-oriented operating system.

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More in Tux Machines

Radeon vs. NVIDIA Performance For HITMAN On Linux With 17 GPUs

Last week Feral Interactive released the much anticipated Linux port of HITMAN, which debuted for Windows last year. Now that there's benchmark support for HITMAN on Linux, I have been running a number of tests for this game that's powered by the Glacier Engine and making use of OpenGL for rendering on Linux. In this article are our initial AMD Radeon performance figures making use of the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver compared to NVIDIA's driver and the assortment of GeForce results published yesterday. Read more

How China Mobile Is Using Linux and Open Source

China Mobile is one of the biggest telecom companies in the world, with more than 800 million users in China -- all of whom are served with open source technologies. During the 2016 Mobile World Congress, China Mobile declared that the operational support system running their massive network would be based on open source software. China Mobile is not alone; many major networking vendors are moving to open source technologies. For example, AT&T is building their future network on top of OpenStack, and they have invested in software-defined technology so significantly that they now call themselves a software company. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • [elementaryOS] AppCenter: Funded
    A few moments ago, we hit 100% funded for our AppCenter campaign on Indiegogo. Thank you, backers! More than 300 people backed us over just two weeks to help bring our pay-what-you-want indie app store to life.
  • Linux Lite To Have These New Features In The Next Release Linux Lite 3.4
    ...we contacted the creator of the Linux Lite “Jerry Bezencon” and enquired the upcoming new features in the latest version of the Linux Lite. We have also done a review of the latest available distro i.e. 3.2 (32 bit) so that the readers can understand easily where are the new features headed towards.
  • Buy or Sell? What Analysts Recommends: CMS Energy Corporation (CMS), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • What Does The Chart For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell Us Presently?
  • LEDE-17.01 is coming [Ed: it has actually just come out, just like LWN's paywall]
    For some years, OpenWrt has arguably been the most active router-oriented distribution. Things changed in May of last year, though, when a group of OpenWrt developers split off to form the competing LEDE project. While the LEDE developers have been busy, the project has yet to make its first release. That situation is about to change, though, as evidenced by the LEDE v17.01.0-rc1 release candidate, which came out on February 1. Many of the changes made in LEDE since the 2015 OpenWrt "Chaos Calmer" release will not be immediately visible to most users. The core software has been updated, of course, including a move to the 4.4.42 kernel. There are a number of security-oriented enhancements, including a switch to SHA256 for package verification, the disabling of support for several old and insecure protocols, compilation with stack-overwrite detection, and more. There is support for a number of new devices. Perhaps the most anticipated new feature, though, is the improved smart queue management and the WiFi fairness work that has been done as part of the bufferbloat project. It has been clear for some time that WiFi should work far better than it does; the work that has found its way into the LEDE release candidate should be a significant step in that direction. Your editor decided that it was time to give LEDE a try, but there was some shopping to be done first. Getting the full benefit from the bufferbloat and airtime fairness work requires the right chipset; most of this work has been done on the Atheros ath9k driver. So the first step was to go out and pick up a new router with ath9k wireless. That is where the things turned out to be harder than one might expect.
  • Microsoft Faces European Privacy Probes Over Windows 10
    Microsoft Corp. faces a coordinated investigation by European privacy regulators after it failed to do enough to address their concerns about the collection and processing of user data with a series of changes to Windows 10 last month. European Union data-protection officials sent a letter to Microsoft saying they remain “concerned about the level of protection of users’ personal data,” according to a copy of the document posted by the Dutch watchdog Tuesday. Regulators from seven countries are concerned that even after the announced changes, “Microsoft does not comply with fundamental privacy rules.”