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Zafiro Icon – A New Set Of Flat Icon Theme Pack With Light Colors For Linux Desktops

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Zafiro icons is minimalist icons created with the flat-desing technique, utilizing washed out colors and always accompanied by white.

This icon set looks good and awesome.

It’s a new set of flat icon pack and it’s not based on any other product.

I felt it’s similar to Paper Icon and you can get that by navigation to the corresponding link.

Since it’s new set of icon and the developer is requesting us to report for any missing application related icons and not for other categories.

If any one fork this icon pack then the developer would feel that his work got recognized.

This icons are compatible with most of the Linux desktop environments such as Gnome, Unity, Cinnamon, Mate, Lxde, Xfce and others.

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Linux 4.20 and LF Leftovers

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Linux
  • Revised High Resolution Scroll Wheel Support For Logitech/Microsoft Mice On Linux

    Originally slated for the current Linux 4.20 kernel cycle was high-resolution scroll wheel support for Logitech mice. Just a short time after merging, the support was reverted as it ended up breaking support for some existing devices. Fortunately, the revised implementation is progressing and perhaps will be ready for Linux 4.21.

  • OpenChain Project Gains Facebook, Google and Uber as Platinum Members

    The OpenChain Project, which builds trust in open source by making open source license compliance simpler and more consistent, announced today at Open Compliance Summit that Facebook, Google and Uber have joined as platinum members.  The only standard for open source compliance in the supply chain, OpenChain provides a specification as well as overarching processes, policies and training that companies need to be successful.

    Every day companies consume billions of lines of open source software through their supply chains as they build exciting new products and services. One key challenge as  code flows between companies is ensuring the relevant license requirements are met in a timely and effective manner. Many organizations seek to address similar compliance issues in a similar manner, providing an excellent opportunity for consolidation and harmonization.

    The OpenChain Project provides companies with a consistent way to address these challenges. At the heart of the project is a specification, an overarching standard for how companies of all sizes, whether in physical products, in the cloud or internally, can deal with open source compliance.

    Running some of the largest data centers, platforms and cloud infrastructure in the world, Facebook, Google and Uber use a considerable amount of open source software in their businesses and are joining the OpenChain project to proactively manage open source across their supply chains.

Another Linux 4.20 Performance Regression Has Now Been Addressed (THP)

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Linux

The bumpy Linux 4.19~4.20 road continues but at least another performance regression is now crossed off.

Google's David Rientjes has landed a patch in mainline Linux 4.20 Git as of yesterday that restores node-locale hugepage allocations. Changes to Transparent Huge-Pages, which THP itself was designed to improve performance and make it easier to utilize huge-pages, had caused a performance regression to be introduced back during the 4.20 merge window.

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On Linus' Return to Kernel Development

Filed under
Development
Linux

On October 23, 2018, Linus Torvalds came out of his self-imposed isolation, pulling a lot of patches from the git trees of various developers. It was his first appearance on the Linux Kernel Mailing List since September 16, 2018, when he announced he would take a break from kernel development to address his sometimes harsh behavior toward developers. On the 23rd, he announced his return, which I cover here after summarizing some of his pull activities.

For most of his pulls, he just replied with an email that said, "pulled". But in one of them, he noticed that Ingo Molnar had some issues with his email, in particular that Ingo's mail client used the iso-8859-1 character set instead of the more usual UTF-8. Linus said, "using iso-8859-1 instead of utf-8 in this day and age is just all kinds of odd. It looks like it was all fine, but if Mutt has an option to just send as utf-8, I encourage everybody to just use that and try to just have utf-8 everywhere. We've had too many silly issues when people mix locales etc and some point in the chain gets it wrong."

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Linux Mint 19.1 “Tessa” Xfce, MATE and Cinnamon

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GNU
Linux
  • Linux Mint 19.1 “Tessa” Xfce – BETA Release

    Linux Mint 19.1 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2023. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

  • Linux Mint 19.1 “Tessa” MATE – BETA Release

    Linux Mint 19.1 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2023. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

  • Linux Mint 19.1 “Tessa” Cinnamon – BETA Release

    Linux Mint 19.1 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2023. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

6 of the Best Linux Distros for Gaming

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Not that many people associate Linux with gaming, but the times are changing and big dogs in the industry are coming up with clever ways to make games tick on the platforms. Wine is compatible with more games than ever these days, and Valve may be on the verge of a Linux gaming revolution with Proton – which lets you run native Windows games in Linux via Steam.

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Take a break at the Linux command line with Nyan Cat

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Linux

We're now on day six of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar, where we explore some of the fun, entertaining, and in some cases, utterly useless toys available for your Linux terminal. All are available under an open source license.

Will they all be unique? Yes. Will they all be unique to you? I don't know, but, chances are you'll find at least one new toy to play with by the time our advent calendar is done.

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Linux Plumbers Conference 2018 Coverage by LWN

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Linux
  • Bringing the Android kernel back to the mainline

    Android devices are based on the Linux kernel but, since the beginning, those devices have not run mainline kernels. The amount of out-of-tree code shipped on those devices has been seen as a problem for most of this time, and significant resources have been dedicated to reducing it. At the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference, Sandeep Patil talked about this problem and what is being done to address it. The dream of running mainline kernels on Android devices has not yet been achieved, but it may be closer than many people think.

    Android kernels, he said, start their life as a long-term stable (LTS) release from the mainline; those releases are combined with core Android-specific code to make the Android Common Kernel releases. Vendors will pick a common kernel and add a bunch more out-of-tree code to create a kernel specific to a system-on-chip (SoC) and ship that to device manufacturers. Eventually one of those SoC kernels is frozen, perhaps with yet another pile of out-of-tree code tossed in, and used as the kernel for a specific device model. It now only takes a few weeks to merge an LTS release into the Android Common Kernel, but it's still a couple of years before that kernel shows up as a device kernel. That is why Android devices are always running ancient kernels.

  • A panel discussion on the kernel's code of conduct

    There has been a great deal of discussion around the kernel project's recently adopted code of conduct (CoC), but little of that has happened in an open setting. That changed to an extent when a panel discussion was held during the Kernel Summit track at the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference. Panelists Mishi Choudhary, Olof Johansson, Greg Kroah-Hartman, and Chris Mason took on a number of issues surrounding the CoC in a generally calm and informative session.

    Kroah-Hartman began by apologizing for the process by which the code was adopted. Linus Torvalds wanted something quickly, Kroah-Hartman said, so the process was rushed and a lot of political capital was burned to get the code into the kernel. He has since been trying to make up for things by talking to a lot of people; while he apologized for how things happened, he also insisted that it was necessary to take that path. The "code of conflict" that preceded the current code was also pushed into the kernel over a period of about three weeks; "we have been here before", he said.

  • The kernel developer panel at LPC

    The closing event at the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) was a panel of kernel developers. The participants were Laura Abbott, Anna-Maria Gleixner, Shuah Khan, Julia Lawall, and Anna Schumaker; moderation was provided by Kate Stewart. This fast-moving discussion covered the challenges of kernel development, hardware vulnerabilities, scaling the kernel, and more.

    The initial topic was entry into kernel development, and the panelists' experience in particular. Khan, who got started around seven years ago, said that her early experience was quite positive; she named Tim Bird as a developer who gave her a lot of good advice at the beginning. Abbott started by tracking down a bug that was causing trouble internally; after getting some feedback, she was able to get that work merged into the mainline — an exciting event. Schumaker started with a relatively easy project at work. Lawall, instead, started by creating the Coccinelle project back around 2004. Her experience was initially somewhat painful, since the patches she was creating had to go through a lot of different maintainers.

    It had been a busy week at LPC, Stewart said, asking the panelists what stood out for them. Khan called out the networking track as a place where she learned a lot, but also said that the conference helped her to catch up with what is going on with the kernel as a whole, which is not an easy thing to do. She mentioned the sessions on the kernel's code of conduct and the creation of a maintainer's handbook.

  • Toward a kernel maintainer's guide

    "Who's on Team Xmas Tree?" asked Dan Williams at the beginning of his talk in the Kernel Summit track of the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference. He was referring to a rule for the ordering of local variable declarations within functions that is enforced by a minority of kernel subsystem maintainers — one of many examples of "local customs" that can surprise developers when they submit patches to subsystems where they are not accustomed to working. Documenting these varying practices is a small part of Williams's project to create a kernel maintainer's manual, but it seems to be where the effort is likely to start.

    In theory, Williams said, kernel maintenance is a straightforward task. All it takes is accumulating patches and sending a pull request or two to Linus Torvalds during the merge window. In this ideal world, subsystems are the same and there is plenty of backup to provide continuity when a maintainer takes a vacation. In the real world, though, the merge window is a stressful time for maintainers. It involves a lot of work juggling topic branches, a lot of talking to people (which is an annoying distraction), and the fact that Torvalds can instinctively smell a patch that is not yet fully cooked. Maintenance practices vary between subsystems, and there is no backup for the maintainers in many of them. It is hard for a maintainer to take a break.

  • Updates on the KernelCI project

    The kernelci.org project develops and operates a distributed testing infrastructure for the kernel. It continuously builds, boots, and tests multiple kernel trees on various types of boards. Kevin Hilman and Gustavo Padovan led a session in the Testing & Fuzzing microconference at the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) to describe the project, its goals, and its future.

    KernelCI is a testing framework that is focused on actual hardware. Hilman is one of the developers of the project and he showed a picture of his shed where he has 80 different embedded boards all wired up as part of the framework. KernelCI came out of the embedded space and the Arm community; there are so many different hardware platforms, it became clear there was a need to ensure that the code being merged would actually work on all of them. Since then, it has expanded to more architectures.

  • Filesystems and case-insensitivity

    A recurring topic in filesystem-developer circles is on handling case-insensitive file names. Filesystems for other operating systems do so but, by and large, Linux filesystems do not. In the Kernel Summit track of the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC), Gabriel Krisman Bertazi described his plans for making Linux filesystems encoding-aware as part of an effort to make ext4, and possibly other filesystems, interoperable with case-insensitivity in Android, Windows, and macOS.

    Case-insensitive file names for Linux have been discussed for a long time. The oldest reference he could find was from 2002, but it has come up at several Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summits (LSFMM), including in 2016 and in Krisman's presentation this year. It has languished so long without a real solution because the problem has many corner cases and it is "tricky to get it right".

Devices: Texas Instruments, Old Computer That Can be Paired With Raspberry Pi, and More

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • TI’s first 64-bit SoC debuts on Linux-driven Phytec module

    Phytec’s “phyCore-AM65x SOM” and dev kit runs Linux on TI’s new AM65x SoC, which combines 4x Cortex-A53 cores, a PowerVR GPU, 2x Cortex-R5F MCUs, and 6x real-time PRU chips that support up to 6x TSN capable GbE ports.

    Texas Instruments recently began sampling its first 64-bit ARMv8 SoC. The dual- or quad-core Cortex-A53 based Sitara AM65x will first appear on two TI evaluation module kits, as well as Phytec’s phyCore-AM65x SOM module and development kit, which will arrive in Q1 2019 (see farther below).

  • Yet Another Restomod Of The Greatest Computer Ever

    The current plans are to attach a modem to this SE/30, have it ring into a Raspberry Pi, and surf the web over a very slow connection. There is another option, though: You can get a WiFi adapter for the SE/30, and there’s a System 7 extension to make it work. Yes, we’re living in the future, in the past. It’s awesome.

  • Valve wants you to turn your Raspberry Pi into a makeshift Steam Link box

    Gaming giant Valve has revealed a Steam Link app that's in beta for both the Raspberry Pi 3 and Pi 3+, which can turn the microcomputer into a rough take on the Steam Link box that allows for Steam games to be streamed from a PC to a TV if the box is connected to the same network.

Growing Your Small Business With An Affordable OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If we're talking in terms of the Linux OS here, which we usually are, you're going to be able to unwrap a business server as soon as the box is delivered to your office. Ready made for your needs, available to upload whatever kind of data and security onto, a Linux operated network for your small company could just be the very thing to kickstart your operations. After all, you need to take the time to get your entire network and company policy set up, and that could be a good week or even a month out of your timeframe!

And if you've got something ready to be operated off of immediately, all of the employees you work with can set up their accounts and get to logging on with this network as soon as they're required to. It's a streamlined process that might just be invaluable to your deadline of opening up your doors for the first time.

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Five-Way Linux OS Comparison On Amazon's ARM Graviton CPU

Last month Amazon rolled out their "Graviton" ARM processors in the Elastic Compute Cloud. Those first-generation Graviton ARMv8 processors are based on the ARM Cortex-A72 cores and designed to offer better pricing than traditional x86_64 EC2 instances. However, our initial testing of the Amazon Graviton EC2 "A1" instances didn't reveal significant performance-per-dollar benefits for these new instances. In this second round of Graviton CPU benchmarking we are seeing what is the fastest of five of the leading ARM Linux distributions. An Amazon EC2 a1.4xlarge instance with 16 cores / 32GB RAM was used for this round of benchmarking across the five most common ARM Linux distributions that were available at the time of testing on the Elastic Compute Cloud. The tests included: Amazon Linux 2 - The reference Amazon Linux machine image with the Linux 4.14 kernel and GCC 7.3. Read more

Take a swim at your Linux terminal with asciiquarium

We're now nearing the end of our 24-day-long Linux command-line toys advent calendar. Just one week left after today! If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. We’re figuring that out as we go, but generally, it could be a game, or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal. Read more

Photography and Linux

So, as you can see, except for the printing step, pretty much the whole workflow is handled very easily by Linux and open-source photography software. Could I have done the whole thing in Linux? Yes and no. Depending on your printing needs, you could forego the printer entirely and use a local professional printing service. Many of those shops use the ROES system for the uploading and management of images to be printed. The ROES client is written in Java and is compatible with Linux. If you invest in a large format printer, you may have to investigate using a solution similar to what I have set up. Open-source software RIPs exist, but they have not been updated for more than a decade. Some commercial Linux solutions are available, but they are prohibitively expensive. Read more

Linux 3.18.130

I'm announcing the release of the 3.18.130 kernel. All users of the 3.18 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 3.18.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-3.18.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more