Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

Microsoft silently kills dev backdoor that boots Linux on locked-down Windows RT slabs

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft has quietly killed a vulnerability that can be exploited to unlock ARM-powered Windows RT tablets and boot non-Redmond-approved operating systems.

The Register has learned that one of the security holes addressed this week in the July edition of Microsoft's Patch Tuesday closes a backdoor left in Windows RT by its programmers during its development.

That backdoor can be exploited to unlock the slab's bootloader and start up an operating system of your choice, such as GNU/Linux or Android, provided it supports the underlying hardware.

Read more [Ed: Microsoft LOOOOOOOVES Linux]

Automotive Grade Linux spec v2.0 arrives, adoption grows

Filed under
Linux

The Automotive Grade Linux project released v2 of its open platform for connected cars, and added support for Raspberry Pi, DragonBoard, and Wandboard SBCs.

The Linux Foundation’s Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) project, which is developing a “Linux-based, open platform for the connected car,” announced the release of the second version of its Unified Code Base (UCB) distribution for in-vehicle infotainment (IVI). The latest version adds features like audio routing, rear seat display support, the beginnings of an app platform, and support for development boards including the DragonBoard, Wandboard, and Raspberry Pi.

Read more

Low power Sitara SBC has dual GbE’s and M.2 for WiFi/BT

Filed under
Android
Linux

Advantech’s 3.5-inch “RSB-4221” SBC runs Android or Linux on a TI Sitara AM3358 SoC and features dual GbE, USB and serial I/O, and an M.2 slot for wireless.

Here at HackerBoards.com (previously LinuxGizmos), we have covered numerous Sitara AM335x-based SBCs and also a lot of 3.5-inch SBCs, so it’s surprising that Advantech’s RSB-4221 is the only AM335x-based 3.5-inch SBC we’ve seen aside from Embedian’s SBC-SMART-BEE and SBC-SMART-MEM. The Embedian boards aren’t even fully comparable since they’re sandwich style COM-plus-carrier combos rather than integrated SBCs, and they have lower-end AM3352 and AM3354 models instead of the RSB-4221’s AM3358, which adds a PowerVR SGX 530 3D GPU and dual PRU-ICSS chips.

Read more

Watch: Security Researchers Use Ubuntu Linux to Hack ROS-Powered Surgical Robots

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Today we're continuing our "Watch" series of articles with a new one where you'll be able to see a group of security researchers attempting to hack a surgical robot, courtesy of Motherboard.

Read more

You Can Now Upgrade from Linux Mint 17.3 Cinnamon and MATE to Linux Mint 18

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" computer operating system arrived two weeks ago, on June 30, with the usual Cinnamon and MATE editions, but an upgrade patch was not available for users running Linux Mint 17.3 "Rosa".

Today, July 14, 2016, Linux Mint project leader Clement Lefebvre informs the community that the upgrade path from Linux Mint 17.3 "Rosa" to Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" is now open and they can start upgrading their operating systems as we speak, following the instructions provided below.

Read more

Samsung Gear Manager updated for Tizen Smartwatches to Version 2.2.16070451

Filed under
Linux

Today, the Gear Manager app, which is used to connect a Smartphone with the Gear Smartwatches, has received another update, taking it to version 2.2.16070451. There is no changelog at the moment so this possibly the usual bug-fixes and performance improvements.

Read more

Ubuntu MATE, Pithos and the Sounds of Popcorn

Filed under
GNU
Linux

My trusty old Sony Vaio laptop has been saddled up with Ubuntu MATE for a little over a month now. For the most part, it’s running just as smoothly as it ever did on Windows XP — and definitely better than it ran with the lovingly installed bloatware that came included with it shiny and new from the factory.

Upon the suggestion of FOSS Force reader Jeff, I invested in a recent upgrade of RAM that fulfills its maximum potential of a single gigabyte. Compared to its performance in the past, it’s definitely noticeable. But compared to my main work computer with a humble (by modern standards) 4 GB RAM, it can feel a little sluggish if I try to do do something unreasonable — like having two programs open at once.

Read more

Devices and Hardware (Linux and Hacker-Friendly)

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
OSS
  • 8 open source point of sale systems

    Running a small business isn't easy, and especially so for retailers, restaurant owners, and others who have a brick-and-mortar storefront. Managing purchases and cash flow, keeping inventory stocked, making sure your employees are happy, and above all else serving your customers needs requires dedication, a solid business plan, and a bit of luck to be successful.

  • ELC video explains the mystery of modern caches

    In his recent ELC talk, ARM kernel developer Mark Rutland traced the evolution of caches over the last decade or so, and explained how to manage them.

    “If you’re a bit tired, this is a presentation on cache maintenance, so there will be plenty of opportunity to sleep,” began Rutland. Despite this warning, Rutland’s presentation, titled Embedded Linux Conference presentation titled Stale Data, or How We (Mis-)manage Modern Caches, was actually kind of an eye opener — at least as far as cache management presentations go.

  • This open source CNC system integrates high-tech automation into backyard farming

    This story might more properly belong on RobotHugger, but with its open source DIY approach to small-scale food production, FarmBot is worth a look.

    The old-school gardener in me is battling my high-tech early adopter side over whether or not this robotic farming device is a step toward greater food sovereignty or toward a dystopian future where robot overlords rule backyard farms. Sure, it's easy enough to learn to garden the old fashioned way, on your hands and knees with your hands in the soil, but considering that one of the excuses for not growing some our own food is lack of time and lack of skills and knowledge, perhaps this automated and optimized small-scale farming approach could be a feasible solution for the techie foodies who would like homegrown food without having to have a green thumb.

  • Tropical Labs Offers a Powerful Open Source Servo for Makers

    Joe Church from Tropical Labs wanted low cost, accurate servo motors for a project but was unable to find the right parts for his need. The team began to develop motors and recording their progress on hackaday.io. The motor project eventually turned into Mechaduino, and Tropical Labs is running a highly successful Kickstarter campaign to fund the first run of production motors.

  • SiFive – the open-source hardware company

    Customisation periods end with ICs becoming complex and expensive and, at that point, standardisation comes in and returns ICs to affordability.

    Or that’s the theory.

    Over the years there have been many ways to bring the cost of custom silicon down – MPW, ASIC, P-SOC, FPGAs and, latterly, ARM’s offer of free access to Cortex-M0 processor IP through DesignStart which aims to deliver test chips for $16,000.

Kernel Space: Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Linux
  • Automotive Grade Linux Releases 2.0 Spec Amid Growing Support
  • Linux Has Seen 30k+ Commits So Far This Year

    Being half-way now through the year and Linux 4.7 coming later this month, I figured it would be fun to run some statistics on the Linux kernel Git repository to see how this year is stacking up compared to past years.

    When running GitStats on the mainline kernel tree as of yesterday, there were 21,718,865 lines of code reported across 603,345 commits by 15,430 different authors.

  • Thunderbolt Networking Support Is Still Being Worked On For Linux

    Thunderbolt networking support is still being worked on for the mainline Linux kernel.

    The set of patches for implementing Thunderbolt networking for Linux is up to its third revision. These patches are for enabling networking of computer-to-computer over a Thunderbolt cable for non-Apple hardware. This adds the Thunderbolt networking support for hardware with a firmware-based controller, namely the Intel Connection Manager (ICM). These Linux kernel patches continue to be worked on by Intel with Amir Levy sending them out.

  • NVIDIA Releases "The World's Most Advanced VR Game", Will Be Open-Sourced
  • Why We Made the World’s Most Advanced VR Game – NVIDIA VR Funhouse

    Today’s release of NVIDIA VR Funhouse extends our role in the gaming ecosystem to that of a game creator.

    Our first game, NVIDIA VR Funhouse is built on Epic’s Unreal Engine 4, and is the brainchild of NVIDIA’s LightSpeed Studios. It was created with a dual-purpose.

    First, we wanted it to be fun. To be enjoyed by people of all ages, whether or not they’ve tried VR, whether or not they’re an early adopter.

    Second, it was created to show how immersive VR can be when physics simulation is fully integrated into an experience.

  • Intel Has A Final Round Of Graphics Updates For Linux 4.8, Broxton Is Ready

    Daniel Vetter of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has submitted the final round of feature updates for the i915 DRM driver for DRM-Next to in turn target the Linux 4.8 kernel.

    The Intel DRM code already had some pull requests of material in DRM-Next for Linux 4.8. The previous pulls included work on DisplayPort++ dongles, more GuC stuff, panel-related work and one end-user feature that's new is the GVT-g para-virtualization support for Broadwell and newer.

  • The Founder Of Wayland Has Joined Google

    Last week we reported on Kristian Høgsberg, the founder of Wayland and a long-time Linux graphics developer, leaving his position at Intel. We now know he headed off to Google.

    Through his LinkedIn profile he has confirmed that he's now working for Google in the Portland area as a software engineer.

GNU/Linux Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux 2017 – The Road to Hell

    The Year of Linux is the year that you look at your distribution, compare to the year before, and you have that sense of stability, the knowledge that no matter what you do, you can rely on your operating system. Which is definitely not the case today. If anything, the issues are worsening and multiplying. You don’t need a degree in math to see the problem.

    I find the lack of consistency to be the public enemy no. 1 in the open-source world. In the long run, it will be the one deciding factor that will determine the success of Linux. Sure, applications, but if the operating system is not transparent, people will not choose it. They will seek simpler, possibly less glamorous, but ultimately more stable solutions, because no one wants to install a patch and dread what will happen after a reboot. It’s very PTSD. And we know Linux can do better than that. We’ve seen it. Not that long ago. That’s all.

  • Voice of the Masses: How did you discover Linux?

    For our next podcast, we want to hear how you got into GNU/Linux. Where did your journey begin? Maybe you saw it on the coverdisc of a magazine somewhere, or a friend recommended that you try it. Perhaps your company switched to Linux which encouraged you to install it at home, or you simply became so enraged with Windows that you had to find something else.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

ura and the Challenges of Open Source Design

Elio Qoshi is the person behind ura, a fascinating design studio dedicated to improving design in free and open source projects. As part of that mission, ura works with projects of all budgets. When we talk about open source, we’re usually talking code first and then—maybe—documentation second. Design is often an after-thought. But as designers like Elio get involved in open source culture, that order could eventually change. Read more

GNOME 3.21.4 Desktop Arrives for Testing As GUADEC Conference Approaches

Frederic Peters has been happy to inform Softpedia about the availability of the fourth development release for the upcoming GNOME 3.22 "Karlsruhe" desktop environment for GNU/Linux operating systems. Read more

Ubuntu Budgie Remix 16.04.1 Released with Full-Disk Encryption, Snap Support

David Mohammed has been extremely happy to inform Softpedia about the availability of the Ubuntu Budgie Remix 16.04.1 operating system, as part of the recent Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) release. Read more

Bodhi 4.0.0 Alpha Release

Not only is our first 4.0.0 alpha release here – but it is here relatively on schedule. If all goes according to plan we will have something stamped as stable before September hits. I would just like to be clear that this is far from a polished / finished product. I would encourage anyone wanting to write a review to wait to do so until our stable release. If you are not someone who is interested in helping find issues please wait as well. Read more