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Linux Graphics and Benchmarks

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Linux
  • Mesa 17.0.4's Release Is imminent

    Mesa 17.0.4 will be released as soon as this weekend with more than two dozen fixes.

    While preparing for the Mesa 17.1 branching, Mesa release manager Emil Velikov is concurrently working to get Mesa 17.0's latest point release.

  • Intel Vulkan Driver Preps External Memory Extensions For Mesa 17.2

    Intel's Jason Ekstrand has posted 21 new Mesa patches for adding the VK_KHX_external extensions to their ANV Vulkan driver. He believes the patches are now ready for merging and plans to land them for what will become Mesa 17.2.

  • MSAA Support Added To The OpenSWR Software Rasterizer

    Intel's OpenSWR graphics software rasterizer living within Mesa now has experimental support for MSAA.

  • AMD Ryzen 5 1600X Linux Benchmarks and Review: Good CPU Poor Value

    Finally, we have the top model of the AMD Ryzen 5 launch series, the AMD Ryzen 7 1600X. This is a really interesting CPU. In terms of specs, it is a 6 core 12 thread part with 16MB L3 cache and a 95W TDP. Immediately that gives it an advantage in a market where the average consumer space PC has, at most, 4 cores and 8 threads. While a lot of sites are pitting the AMD Ryzen 5 1600X against competition from Intel, we have the full Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 7 lineups to pit the CPU against. In our view, the AMD Ryzen 5 1600X is a great CPU, but it struggles in the value department against AMD’s other CPU offerings. With a dozen test systems set up, mostly for DemoEval, and running and over a month worth of hours on the clock with Ryzen, we have a good idea regarding where value lies in the continuum.

  • Blender Cycles: OpenCL now is on par with CUDA

    AMD videocard owners rejoice! With the work on the split Cycles OpenCL Kernel, the performance of AMD GPU's has increased dramatically.

Desktop GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Galago Pro Available for Preorder

    Today Denver-based System76 allowed for preorder of the new Galago Pro. The Galago Pro is a 13” aluminum-body laptop, weighing in at 2.87lbs (1.3kg). The new laptop is very thin, but despite its size sports up to 32GB of RAM, 6TB of storage, and a 7 th Gen Intel i5 or i7 CPU. On top of that, the Galago Pro has many ports missing from modern ultra-thin laptops, such as an ethernet port. The starting price is $899.

  • Old Vista Laptop Into A Linux ZFS File Server Part 2

    In the previous Linux ZFS File Server article I put forth a list of parts that allowed me to utilize an old Vista laptop as a Linux+ZFS fileserver. In this article, I will detail how to put all the pieces together, from installing the Linux OS to connecting all the hard drives.

    First, we need to connect all the hardware. The eSATA card needs to be plugged into the slot, the USB3 Ethernet adapter needs to go in an available USB2 slot and connected with a CAT5 or better (CAT5e, CAT6) Ethernet cord to your existing router.

  • Old Vista Laptop Into A Linux ZFS File Server Part 3

    In the previous article, I showed you how to install Lubuntu 14.04 64-bit and install the important bits of Samba and the ZFS filesystem. In this article, I will give you the interesting details on how to get your Probox-connected disks up and running as a ZFS RAID10, starting with (1) disk and growing to a full 4-disk RAID10 in real-time. Please note: Follow these steps at your own risk. I take no responsibility for data loss! You will need to be careful and make sure you are using the right disks when entering administration commands.

[Stable] OpenELEC 8.0.1 released

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GNU
Linux
Movies

OpenELEC 8.0.1 release has been published. Users running OpenELEC 8.0.0 or later with auto-update enabled will be prompted on-screen to reboot and apply the update once it has been downloaded and enabled in some hours. Users running older OpenELEC releases or with auto-update disabled will need to manually update. If you would like to update from an older OpenELEC release please read update instructions/advice on the Wiki before updating. Manual update files can be obtained from the downloads page.

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Capsule8 Building Container-Aware Security Platform for Linux

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Linux
Security

Security startup Capsule8 emerged from its stealth mode in February with a plan to help provide a new model for application container security. In a video interview with eWEEK, Capsule8 CTO Dino Dai Zovi and CEO John Viega explain what's missing from container security today and what they are building to help fill the gap.

"Capsule8 is container-aware, real-time threat protection for Linux-based production environments," Dai Zovi said.

Dai Zovi explained that the company name Capsule8 is a pun on what it does—which is encapsulates security knowledge in software, providing a secure approach to application delivery and deployment.

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An Important Linux Kernel Security Patch Is Available for CentOS 7, Update Now

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Linux
Red Hat
Security

CentOS maintainer Johnny Hughes has informed the community about the availability of yet another important kernel security update, this time for users of the CentOS Linux 7 operating system series.

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Cloud-enabled WiFi router adds VPN and Dynamic DNS

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Linux
Hardware

Roqos has upgraded its Linux-based “Roqos Core” dual-band WiFi-ac router with a v.16 upgrade that adds VPN connections and Dynamic DNS.

The Debian Linux driven Roqos Core router is now available with a v.1.6 upgrade that adds Virtual Private Network (VPN) and Dynamic DNS features. With the VPN feature, users can make a secure VPN connection from anywhere in the world, says Virginia based Roqos.

The Roqos VPN feature supports Android devices with a new Android app. iOS users can initially use OpenVPNConnect based on the open source OpenVPN technology, but this will be replaced later this year with a more customized iOS app. Desktop and laptop users running Linux, Windows, or Mac can use the open source OpenConnect app.

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The Future of Desktop Ubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

There hasn’t been this much news about a single Linux distro in like forever. Well, maybe when Caldera, operating under the name SCO, sued IBM for a cool billion, but other than that…nada. One thing’s for sure, the announcements that have been coming out of the Isle of Man for the last couple of weeks mean that Canonical has forever changed its course.

It also indicates that Mark Shuttleworth has decided that it’s now do or die time — you know, put up or shut up, money talks and bullcrap walks and all that. This means that from this point forward, Canonical will no longer be a company focused on the desktop. From here on out, it’s enterprise all the way, baby.

That’s probably going to work out well for enterprise users of Linux — time will tell. It doesn’t bode well for down in the trenches users of desktop Linux. From here on out, at Canonical, desktop Linux will be job number two. If that.

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Big Linux bug, low security concerns

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Linux
Security

This Linux/Android bug sure sounded bad.

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Symantec announced a LinuxKernel ipv4/udp.c bug that made the LinuxKernel 4.4 and earlier vulnerable to remote code-execution. In turn, an attacker could exploit this issue to execute arbitrary code. Worse still, even failed exploits might cause denial-of-service attacks.

There's only one problem with this analysis and the resulting uproar: It's wrong.

Yes, the bug existed. NIST described it as a "critical" bug, and its description makes it sound like it can open Linux and Android-powered devices to attacks via UDP network traffic. The important phrase is "sound like."

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Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • A Linux-friendly DAC and headphone amplifier for listening to music

    One of my favorite manufacturers of high-quality, reasonably priced, Linux-friendly audio equipment is Schiit Audio. I recently noticed they have a new gizmo at the low end of their product line, the Fulla 2, and I decided to purchase it. Basically, this is a DAC and headphone amplifier all in one unit, meaning it covers Step 2 and a part of Step 3 as I mentioned previously, and also adds some interesting additional features. I start with the DAC+headphones part. To get it going, you plug the USB cable into a laptop's USB2 or USB3 port and the other end into the Fulla 2's "USB Power and Data Input" port, set up your music player to send output to that device, plug in your headphones, and away you go.

  • Lattice iCE40 FPGA Configured by Linux Kernel

    The example uses a Raspberry Pi connected to an evaluation board. A cheap Sigrok-based logic analyzer let him troubleshoot and debug. If you think FPGA development is expensive, think again. The board used here is well under $50 and the software is free. An iCEStick is even cheaper, and would probably work here, too. You are likely to have the other bits, but even if you need to buy a Pi and the logic analyzer, the whole thing is way under $100.

  • Candy Camera App finally launched in Tizen Store

    Great news for our photography lovers as the Candy Camera app has finally hit the Tizen Store. I say finally, as this is one of the most requested camera apps for the Tizen platform. It has already been a success on Android and iOS for selfies and now JP Brothers Inc. have made it compatible with Tizen Smartphones. Candy Camera has many great features and below I will describe some highlighted features-

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat After Graphics People

GNOME News

  • Desk Changer is a Wallpaper Slideshow Extension for GNOME
    Have you been looking for a GNOME wallpaper slideshow extension? If so, you can stop. In the comments to our recent post on the way GNOME handles wallpapers a number of readers asked whether GNOME had an image slideshow feature built in, without the need for third-party apps and the like. The answer is yes, GNOME does. Sort of.
  • Minwaita: A Compact Version of Theme Adwaita for Gnome Desktop
    As you may already know that Ubuntu is switching back to Gnome, this is the transition time for Ubuntu to switch back. Some creators are motivated and creating themes for Gnome desktop, which is a good thing and hopefully we shall see plenty of Gnome themes and icons around soon. As its name shows "Minwaita" it is minimal/compact version of Adwaita theme, the theme is available after some enhancements to make Gnome more sleek and more vanilla Gnome experience without moving to away from Adwaita's design. This theme is compatible with Gnome 3.20 and up versions. This theme was released back in November, 2016 and still in continuous development that means if you find any problem or bug in the theme then report it to get it fixed in the next update. Obsidian-1 icons used in the following screenshots.
  • Gnome Pomodoro Timer Can Help You Increase Productivity
    If you are struggling with focus on something, it could be your work or study then try Pomodoro technique, this method developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s. The technique uses a timer to break down work into intervals, traditionally 25 minutes in length, separated by short breaks. You can read more about Pomodoro here.
  • Widget hierarchies in GTK+ 4.0
    In GTK+3, only GtkContainer subclasses can have child widgets. This makes a lot of sense for “public” container children like we know them, e.g. GtkBox — i.e. the developer can add, remove and reorder child widgets arbitrarily and the container just does layout.

Red Hat News

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian