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Russia kicks out IBM, Microsoft and Oracle

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

The State Duma, the lower house of Russia's Federal Assembly, is working on a law to reduce government dependence on IBM, Microsoft and Oracle. According to Bloomberg, Russian government agencies will be restricted in buying proprietary software, and will have to prefer open source software instead.

This step further pushes proprietary vendors out of Russia. Russian companies are increasingly buying software from domestic providers like Diasoft and New Cloud technologies, or deploying open source packages like PostgreSQL and Linux, instead of purchasing licensed packages from companies like Oracle, Autodesk and Siemens.

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Also: Russia Makes The Right Moves For The Wrong Reasons

Raspberry Pi IoT HAT starts at $21

Filed under
Linux

The “RabbitMax Flex” is a RPi HAT board for IoT with an IR transceiver, relays, 5x cable slots for I2C sensors, and optional dev kits with LCDs and sensors.

A growing number of Internet of Things add-ons are available for the Raspberry Pi SBC, including HAT add-on boards and other development kits, but most are aimed at more experienced developers. An Indiegogo project from Bulgaria called RabbitMax Flex is targeting the more casual DIY prototyper with a completely open source HAT board that doesn’t require soldering. As the name suggests, the board relies on flexi cables.

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Linux-y things I am thankful for

Filed under
Linux

Thanksgiving is in a few days, and talking about “things I am thankful for” is pretty traditional this time of year.

So, here we go. Here’s my list of Linux-y (and free software-y) things I am thankful for in 2016. (At least the ones I could remember when I sat down to write this list.)

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Radio Free Linux

Filed under
Linux

Do a web search for "Linux radio station", and the pickings are slim indeed, with most sites promoting instead ham radio software or streaming audio players, and a handful devoted to setting up a streaming web radio station—including one such optimistic article in Linux Journal some 15 years ago (see "Running a Net Radio Station with Open-Source Software", January 2001).

Unfortunately, much of this documented interest took place a decade or more in the past via domains like opensourceradio.com that are no longer with us. A few projects persevere, but a good number of postings are similarly dated. The fact is, there are more Linux-based ways to stream and listen to radio stations than there actually are the means to broadcast and control them.

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25 years of Linux in 5 minutes

Filed under
Linux
Movies

Jeremy Garcia of LinuxQuestions.org and Bad Voltage (a podcast) delivers 25 years of Linux in five minutes: starting with Linux's first steps as "just a hobby" for creator Linus Torvalds, to its staggering popularity today with 135,000 developers from more than 1,300 companies and 22 million lines of code .

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Also: Watch now: 5 minute videos on Linux and more

Linux Kernels 4.8.10 and 4.4.34 LTS Out Now, Add SPARC64 and Networking Fixes

Linux Kernel 3.2.84 LTS Released, Adds over 200 Improvements and Bug Fixes

Filed under
Linux
Security

On November 20, 2016, Linux kernel maintainer Ben Hutchings announced the release of the eighty-fourth maintenance update to the long-term supported Linux 3.2 kernel series.

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Also: Linux Kernel 3.16.39 LTS Is a Massive Maintenance Update with 420 Improvements

Cinnamon 3.2 released!

Filed under
Linux

On behalf of the team and all the developers who contributed to this build, I am proud to announce the release of Cinnamon 3.2!

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Also: Cinnamon 3.2 Desktop Officially Released

DVEO's Jitter Box IP/IP

Filed under
Linux

Telco TV/OTT and IPTV operators must deal with the fact that many IP transport streams are asynchronous. This makes the streams prone to poor video quality due to jitter if they are sent to Program Clock Reference (PCR)-compliant devices. A new corrective solution for this challenge is DVEO's Jitter Box IP/IP, a low-power, Linux-based IP PCR jitter-correction appliance.

Designed for telco TV/OTT and IPTV operators, the Jitter Box IP/IP corrects the PCR in IP video transport streams so IP streams can be jitter-free and interoperate with PCR-sensitive devices, such as modulators, muxers, decoders and encapsulators. If an IP stream is not compliant, the Jitter Box IP/IP can make it so. Jitter Box IP/IP also features a web-based GUI that is manageable from anywhere, adds DVEO.

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Linux and FOSS Events

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • Speak at The Linux Foundation’s Invite-Only Open Source Leadership Summit

    The Linux Foundation Open Source Leadership Summit (formerly known as Collaboration Summit) is where the world’s thought leaders in open source software and collaborative development convene to share best practices and learn how to create and advance the open source infrastructure that runs our lives.

    The Linux Foundation is now seeking executives, business and technical leaders, open source program office leaders, and open source foundation and project leaders to share your knowledge, best practices and strategies with fellow leaders at OSLS, to be held Feb. 14-16, 2017, in Lake Tahoe, CA.

  • LLVM Developer Meeting 2016 Videos Posted

    The videos from the LLVM Developer Meeting 2016 conference that took place at the beginning of November are now online.

  • Outreachy Winter 2016 Projects/Participants Announced

    The accepted participants and their projects for the Outreachy Winter 2016 session were announced earlier this month for helping females and other under-represented groups engage in free software development.

Microsoft 'Love' of Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

SUSE Leftovers

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/48
    After releasing daily snapshots without interruption for 17 days, Tumbleweed did slow down a bit during the last week. As already mentioned in my last review, 1124 had been canceled due to an issue with sddm installing strange branding configurations. And later on, we ‘broke’ our own staging setup and needed to bootstrap a few of them, making the throughput much lower than you were used to. So, we ended up with 3 snapshots since my last review: 1125, 1128 and 1129.
  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 28
    November is over, Santa Claus elves start to stress and the YaST team brings you one of the last reports of 2016. Let’s see what’s new in YaSTland.

OSS: AI and Machine Learning

Ubuntu and Derivatives

  • Canonical Sues Cloud Provider, Mint Beta, Devuan Tour
    Ubuntu parent-company, Canonical, today posted that they've been in a dispute with "a European cloud provider" over their use of their own homespun version of Ubuntu on their cloud servers. Their implementation disables even the most basic of security features and Canonical is worried something bad could happen and it'd reflect badly back on them. The post read, "The home-grown images of this provider disable fundamental security mechanisms and modify the system in ways that are unsupportable. They are likely to behave unpredictably on update in weirdly creative and mysterious ways." They said they've spent months trying to get the unnamed provider to use the standard Ubuntu as delivered to other commercial operations to no avail. Canonical feels they have no choice but to "take legal steps to remove these images." They're sure Red Hat and Microsoft wouldn't be treated like this.
  • Taking a stand against unofficial Ubuntu images
    Ubuntu is amazing on the cloud because we work with cloud providers to ensure crisp, consistent and secure images which you can auto-update safely. On every major cloud—AWS, Azure, Google, Rackspace, SoftLayer and many more—you can be confident that ‘Ubuntu’ is Ubuntu, with the same commitment to quality that you can expect when you install it yourself, and we can guarantee that to you because we require that clouds offer only certified Ubuntu images.
  • Canonical Takes Stand Against Unofficial Ubuntu Images, Reportedly Risky & Insecure
    Mark Shuttleworth has written a new blog post where he's outlining a dispute Canonical is having with a European cloud provider over a breach of contract and "publishing insecure, broken images of Ubuntu" for its cloud customers. With these Ubuntu Cloud unofficial images reportedly being buggy, users are complaining to Canonical/Ubuntu, assuming it's an upstream issue. Having enough of that, they are now preparing for legal steps to remove the unofficial Ubuntu images from the particular cloud provider.
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” MATE – BETA Release
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” Cinnamon – BETA Release