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Linux

Mageia 5 GNU/Linux Operating System to Reach End of Life on New Year's Eve

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Linux
MDV

In the blog announcement, the Mageia developer explains that the team decided to postpone the EOL (End-of-Life) for the Mageia 5 release, which was supposed to reach end of life on October 31, until New Year's Eve, because many Mageia 5 users haven't upgraded to Mageia 6.

Announced on July 16, 2017, Mageia 6 is the latest stable release of the GNU/Linux distribution, incorporating some of the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source applications, including the KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment, AppStream support, GRUB2 as default bootloader, a new Xfce Live edition, and much more.

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The Best PCB Design Software For Linux

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Linux

PCB design software is a piece of open source CAD software for use in a number of different engineering industries. PCB design software benefits manufacturing and engineering companies so much because you can run thorough tests on products without having to make a prototype first. This saves no end of time and money and avoids repeated attempts at prototypes because of small errors. It allows you to fix multiple products at a time and most importantly, it is viable for use by smaller businesses as well. Traditionally PCB software has been run on Mac or Windows but there are plenty of programs that are optimized for Linux. If you’re struggling to find the best Linux optimized PCB software, here are some of the best ones on the market at the moment.

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Ubuntu and OpenWRT Linux, Tizen News

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Linux

Complete Guide for Using GNOME Shell Extensions

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Linux

Step-by-step detailed guide shows you how to install and manage GNOME Shell Extensions manually or easily via a web browser.
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LWN Coverage From Realtime Summit, Kernel Summit, GStreamer Conference and More

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Linux
  • The state of the realtime union

    The 2017 Realtime Summit was held October 21 at Czech Technical University in Prague to discuss all manner of topics related to realtime Linux. Nearly two years ago, a collaborative project was formed with the goal of mainlining the realtime patch set. At the summit, project lead Thomas Gleixner reported on the progress that has been made and the plans for the future.

  • The 2017 Kernel and Maintainers Summits

    The 2017 Kernel and Maintainers Summits were held in Prague, Czechia, in late October, co-located with the Open-Source Summit Europe. As usual, LWN was there, and has put together coverage of the topics that were discussed at these meetings.

    The format of the Kernel Summit was changed significantly for this year. The bulk of the schedule has been moved into an completely open set of talks that ran alongside the rest of the OSS tracks; as a result, the attendance at these discussions was larger than in past years and included more people outside of the core kernel community. The invitation-only discussion has been made much smaller (about 30 core maintainers) and turned into a half-day event.

  • Another attempt to address the tracepoint ABI problem

    Tracepoints provide a great deal of visibility into the inner workings of the kernel, which is both a blessing and a curse. The advantages of knowing what the kernel is doing are obvious; the disadvantage is that tracepoints risk becoming a part of the kernel's ABI if applications start to depend on them. The need to maintain tracepoints could impede the ongoing development of the kernel. Ways of avoiding this problem have been discussed for years; at the 2017 Kernel Summit, Steve Rostedt talked about yet another scheme.

    The risk of creating a new ABI has made some maintainers reluctant to add instrumentation to their parts of the kernel, he said. They might be willing to add new interfaces to provide access to specific information but, in the absence of tools that use this information, it is hard to figure out which information is needed or what a proper interface would be. The solution might be to adopt an approach that is similar to the staging tree, where not-ready-for-prime-time drivers can go until they are brought up to the necessary level of quality.

  • Restartable sequences and ops vectors

    Some technologies find their way into the kernel almost immediately; others need to go through multiple iterations over a number of years first. Restartable sequences, a mechanism for lockless concurrency control in user space, fall into the latter category. At the 2017 Kernel Summit, Mathieu Desnoyers discussed yet another implementation of this concept — but this one may not be the last word either.

    The core idea behind restartable sequences has not changed. An application defines a special region of code that, it is hoped, will run without interruption. This code performs some operation of interest on a per-CPU data structure that can be committed with a single instruction at the end. For example, it may prepare to remove an item from a list, with the final instruction setting a pointer that actually effects this change and makes it visible to other threads running on the same CPU. If the thread is preempted in the middle of this work, it may contend with another thread working on the same data structure. In this case, the kernel will cause the thread to jump to an abort sequence once it runs again; the thread can then clean up and try again (the "restart" part of the name). Most of the time, though, preemption does not happen, and the restartable sequence will implement a per-CPU, atomic operation at high speed.

  • Kernel regression tracking, part 1

    The kernel development community has run for some years without anybody tracking regressions; that changed one year ago when Thorsten Leemhuis stepped up to the task. Two conversations were held on the topic at the 2017 Kernel and Maintainers summits in Prague; this article covers the first of those, held during the open Kernel-Summit track.

    Leemhuis begin by pointing out that he started doing this work even though he does not work for a Linux company; he is, instead, a journalist for the largest computer magazine in Germany. He saw a mention of the gap that was left after Rafael Wysocki stopped tracking regressions, and thought that he might be a good fit for the job. This work is being done in his spare time. When he started, he had thought that the job would be difficult and frustrating; in reality, it turned out to be even worse than he expected.

  • Improving printk()

    When a kernel developer wants to communicate a message to user space, be it for debugging or to report a serious problem with the system, the venerable printk() function is usually the tool of choice. But, as Steve Rostedt (accompanied by Petr Mladek and Sergey Senozhatsky) noted during a brief session at the 2017 Kernel Summit, printk() has not aged well. In particular, it can affect the performance of the system as a whole; the roots of that problem and a possible solution were discussed, but a real solution will have to wait for the appearance of the code.

  • GStreamer: state of the union

    The annual GStreamer conference took place October 21-22 in Prague, (unofficially) co-located with the Embedded Linux Conference Europe. The GStreamer project is a library for connecting media elements such as sources, encoders and decoders, filters, streaming endpoints, and output sinks of all sorts into a fully customizable pipeline. It offers cross-platform support, a large set of plugins, modern streaming and codec formats, and hardware acceleration as some of its features. Kicking off this year's conference was Tim-Philipp Müller with his report on the last 12 months of development and what we can look forward to next.

  • Using eBPF and XDP in Suricata

    Much software that uses the Linux kernel does so at comparative arms-length: when it needs the kernel, perhaps for a read or write, it performs a system call, then (at least from its point of view) continues operation later, with whatever the kernel chooses to give it in reply. Some software, however, gets pretty intimately involved with the kernel as part of its normal operation, for example by using eBPF for low-level packet processing. Suricata is such a program; Eric Leblond spoke about it at Kernel Recipes 2017 in a talk entitled "eBPF and XDP seen from the eyes of a meerkat".

GeckoLinux Beta Does openSuse Better

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
SUSE

GeckoLinux is an ideal option for switching to a new distro experience. I particularly like how the Cinnamon desktop works. Since I favor the Cinnamon environment in Linux Mint, changing over to GeckoLinux came with no difficulties. All the settings and features played out as expected.

Kudos to the developer for making GeckoLinux such a solid alternative computing platform. I did not expect a developing early beta to be so glitch-free.

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Graphics: RADV, VC5 Gallium3D, Radeon

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Canonical's Mir Patches Are Breaking RADV With Stock Mesa On Ubuntu

    If you have been trying to use the RADV Radeon Vulkan driver that's packaged for Ubuntu but find it not working, chances are it's caused by Canonical's patches for Mir support.

    RADV developer David Airlie of Red Hat today sent out a notice that Canonical's Mir patches in their Mesa packages are breaking the RADV driver. Ubuntu isn't shipping Vulkan drivers by default yet but ANV and RADV can be easily obtained on Ubuntu Linux systems via sudo apt install mesa-vulkan-drivers for the RADV/ANV drivers built against their stock version of Mesa.

  • VC5 Gallium3D OpenGL Driver Is Starting To Get Fit

    Broadcom's Eric Anholt has remained busy in bringing up the VC5 Gallium3D driver.

    Anholt has added occlusion query support to this driver for next-gen Broadcom graphics hardware as well as improving the debugging output, fixing some crashes, and fixing other OpenGL functionality with this driver. It's been a busy time for him in bringing up this new driver stack as well as continuing to maintain the VC4 driver that continues to be most notably used by the current range of Raspberry Pi ARM boards.

  • More RADV Radeon Vulkan Optimizations Are In The Works

    We are just one week into November and already there are a number of patches volleyed onto the mailing list for continuing to optimize the RADV open-source Radeon Vulkan driver.

  • Radeon VCN Encode Support For RadeonSI Gallium3D

    Earlier this year patches were posted and merged for VCN video decode support with RadeonSI/Gallium3D while now patches are coming from AMD for wiring up VCN video encoding support.

    VCN is a new media block with the upcoming Raven Ridge (Zen+Vega) APUs for both video encode and decode. In the past there was UVD for video decoding and VCE for video encoding while now VCN offers both multimedia encode/decode unified functionality via this new implementation. As mentioned, the VCN video decode bits are already in Mesa while the video encode pieces are now under review.

Linux Boards with Intel (Back Doors)

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Arduino Create Expands to Support Linux on Intel Chips

    When we talk about open source hardware, we often think about the Raspberry Pi and other community-backed single board computers running Linux. Yet all these communities were modeled on the success of the 14-year-old Arduino project, in which Linux has been only tangentially involved, and only over the past four years. The two platforms should grow closer, however, now that Arduino has extended its Arduino Create development environment to support Linux on x86 platforms.

    With the new Linux support, “users are now able to program their Linux devices as if they were regular Arduinos,” says Arduino. Arduino Create works in concert with embedded Linux distributions – initially Ubuntu or Intel’s Wind River Pulsar Linux – to let developers load Arduino sketches to control lower level interfaces to sensors and other Internet of Things peripherals.

  • 3.5-inch SBC comes in 6th and 7th Gen Intel flavors

    Commell’s 3.5-inch “LS-37K” SBC supports 6th or 7th Gen Core S-series and Xeon-E3-1200 v5 CPUs with up to 16GB DDR4, triple displays, 2x SATA, and mSATA.

    Commell announced a 3.5-inch SBC with Intel’s 6th (“Skylake”) or 7th (“Kaby Lake”) Gen Core S-series and Xeon-E3-1200 v5 CPUs. The LS-37K’s layout and feature set are similar to that of its Skylake based LE-37I and LE-37G 3.5-inch boards. As usual, no OS support is listed, but Linux should run with no problem.

  • Apollo Lake DIN-rail computer packs a lot in a little

    Axiomtek’s Linux-friendly “ICO120-83D” IoT gateway runs on a dual-core Apollo Lake Celeron, and offers mini-PCIe expansion and extended temp support.

    Axiomtek has launched an ICO120-83D Internet of Things gateway that runs on Intel’s dual-core, 1.1GHz Celeron N3350 SoC with 6W TDP. The system has the same Apollo Lake processor and fanless DIN-rail design as the recent ICO300-83B gateway, but with a more compact 125 x 100 x 31mm. 0.3 k footprint and a reduced feature set.

Carrier board extends Linux-driven Jetson modules

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Linux

Aetina’s “ACE-N261” Nano-ITX carrier for the Jetson TX1/TX2 COMs offers GbE, HDMI, 2x USB 3.0, 2x CAN, 2x mini-PCIe, and optional -20 to 70°C support.

In April, Aetina announced a Nano-ITX ACE-N620 carrier board for Nvidia’s Jetson TX2 COM, as well as its earlier, pin-compatible Jetson TX1. The company has now announced a more feature-rich ACE-N261 Nano-ITX (120 x 120mm) carrier aimed at machine vision.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

'Turbo Boost Max 3.0' and Mesa 17.2.4

  • Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Skylake Fixed With Linux 4.15
    The platform-drivers-x86 updates have been sent in for Linux 4.15 and include a range of improvements for Intel hardware support. One of the bigger items is support for Skylake CPUs with Turbo Boost Max 3.0.
  • Mesa 17.2.4 Graphics Stack Lands for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 Gamers
    Canonical's Timo Aaltonen reports on the availability of the Mesa 17.2.4 open-source graphics drivers stack on the X-SWAT updates PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 systems. Ubuntu systems have always lagged behind the development of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library, the Linux graphics stack containing open-source drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia GPUs, but they usually catch up with it through a specially crafted PPA (Personal Package Archive) repository that can be easily installed by users.

OSS Leftovers

  • The Future of Marketing Technology Is Headed for an Open-Source Revolution
  • Edging Closer – ODS Sydney
    Despite the fact that OpenStack’s mission statement has not fundamentally changed since the inception of the project in 2010, we have found many different interpretations of the technology through the years. One of them was that OpenStack would be an all-inclusive anything-as-a-service, in a striking parallel to the many different definitions the “cloud” assumed at the time. At the OpenStack Developer Summit in Sydney, we found a project that is returning to its roots: scalable Infrastructure-as-a-Service. It turns out, that resonates well with its user base.
  • Firefox Quantum Now Available on openSUSE Tumbleweed, Linux 4.14 Coming Soon
    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system can now update their computers to the latest and greatest Firefox Quantum web browser.
  • Short Delay with WordPress 4.9
    You may have heard WordPress 4.9 is out. While this seems a good improvement over 4.8, it has a new editor that uses codemirror.  So what’s the problem? Well, inside codemirror is jshint and this has that idiotic no evil license. I think this was added in by WordPress, not codemirror itself. So basically WordPress 4.9 has a file, or actually a tiny part of a file that is non-free.  I’ll now have to delay the update of WordPress to hack that piece out, which probably means removing the javascript linter. Not ideal but that’s the way things go.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers