Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

Tomb Raider for GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Linux Foundation and Linux Announcements

Filed under
Linux

GParted 0.26.0 Launches with Read-Only Support for LUKS Encrypted Filesystems

Filed under
GNU
Linux

GParted developer and maintainer Curtis Gedak proudly announced the release of the GParted 0.26.0 open-source partition editor utility that's widely used in numerous GNU/Linux operating systems.

Read more

OpenELEC fork LibreELEC 7.0.0 arrives with Kodi 16.1

Filed under
Linux

The new LibreELEC fork of the media player focused OpenELEC Linux distribution is available in a final version 7.0.0 built around the new Kodi 16.1 release.

The fork of the Kodi-centric OpenELEC Linux mini-distribution has been building in recent months, and culminated in the Mar. 20 announcement of a new LibreELEC project. Since then the project team has grown from 25 to 40 people, backed up by what appears to be the bulk of the OpenELEC developer community. Its v7.0.0 release is built around the newly finalized Jarvis 16.1 version of the Kodi media center application, formerly known as XBMC. The new project bills itself as a JeOS (Just enough OS) for Kodi.

Read more

Ultra-modular automation controller runs Linux on Sitara

Filed under
Linux

Taiwan-based Tibbo Technology has been developing embedded devices since 2008, including a highly modular Tibbo Project System (TPS) platform that runs its lightweight Tibbo OS (TiOS) operating system. The company’s “Size 2” TPP2 and larger, “Size 3” TPP3 automation controller boards each run TiOS on a Tibbo T1000 ASIC, and support a variety of optional “Tibbit” I/O modules and connectors. Now, Tibbo has launched its first Linux-based TPS board supporting the same Tibbit ecosystem. The “Size 3 Linux Tibbo Project PCB” (LTPP3) board adopts the 165 x 94mm Size 3 footprint, and features -40 to 70°C extended temperature support.

Read more

Bodhi Linux 3.2 Promises Clearer Path to Enlightenment

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Bodhi Linux is elegant and lightweight. It is based on Ubuntu but runs only the forked E17 desktop. It is a very handy distro for those who like the idea of designing their own customized desktop look and feel. You literally have no bloat because you only add what you want to use.

Despite the kudos for Bodhi's configurability, the relatively young desktop environment is devoid of much of the eye candy and animated niceties found in heavier-weight desktops such as Cinnamon and KDE. This is by design and is not a shortcoming. Bodhi is first and foremost true to its minimalistic philosophy.

Bodhi is very easy to use. It has a low learning curve; new Linux users can get acquainted right away. A Quick Start wiki automatically loads on first run.

You can install Bodhi as a dual boot on a Chromebook.

Read more

Manjaro Linux 15.12 Users Finally Receive the GNOME 3.20 Desktop Environment

Filed under
Linux

The Manjaro development team announced today the availability of the seventeenth update for the Manjaro Linux 15.12 (Capella) operating systems, bringing users the latest software updates and security fixes.

Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux Announcements

Filed under
Linux
  • Can OCI Specs Protect Against Balkanization of Containers?

    Open Container Initiative, the vendor conglomerate from different platform camps (Docker, CloudFoundry, etc.) with the promise of creating vendor neutral container standards, has announced the release of new image specification for container images. I thought this is a good time to reflect on the balkanization of containers and do a reality check. If you read further, keep in mind that there is an undercurrent of sarcasm in my commentary Smile.

  • Patches For A New /dev/random Linux Random Number Generator Revised

    Stephan Mueller has published his second version of the in-development patches of the Linux Random Number Generator (LRNG) that seeks to provide a new, drop-in replacement for Linux's /dev/random implementation.

    Mueller describes of his work in V2 form, "The following patch set provides a different approach to /dev/random which I call Linux Random Number Generator (LRNG) to collect entropy within the Linux kernel. The main improvements compared to the legacy /dev/random is to provide sufficient entropy during boot time as well as in virtual environments and when using SSDs. A secondary design goal is to limit the impact of the entropy collection on massive parallel systems and also allow the use accelerated cryptographic primitives. Also, all steps of the entropic data processing are testable. Finally massive performance improvements are visible at /dev/urandom and get_random_bytes."

Best Linux Distros For Kids — Top 5 Free Operating Systems

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It’s a no denying fact that future belongs to open source and Linux, and our younger generation should be introduced with the open source alternatives for Windows and OS X. Along the similar lines, here are the top 5 best Linux distribution for kids and younger audience. Choose wisely and start learning.

Read more

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
  • Experimenting with the Raspberry Pi Sense HAT

    So we decided to try one out ourselves. We grabbed a side room at our offices in Red Hat Tower and spent an hour or two learning what it can do.

    First step, attaching the device. Easy enough!

  • Intel releases the Arduino 101 firmware source code

    We’re very happy to announce that the source code of the real-time operating system (RTOS) powering the Arduino 101 and Genuino 101 is now available for hacking and study purposes.

    The package contains the complete BSP (Board Support Package) for the Curie processor on the 101. It allows you to compile and modify the core OS and the firmware to manage updates and the bootloader. (Be careful with this one since flashing the wrong bootloader could brick your board and require a JTAG programmer to unbrick it).

  • UDOO planning to bring x86 Arduino-compatible maker board to market

    Without doubt, the maker space has gathered real momentum over the last half decade with significant interest in the various incarnations of the Raspberry Pi as well the numerous boards that support Arduino platform.

    UDOO has already made a name for itself in the Arduino space with its UDOO Dual and UDOO Quad single board computers launching on Kickstarter back in April 2013. These were followed up by the UDOO Neo, launching two years later in April 2015. Both campaigns were successfully funded and fulfilled despite some delays in the shipment of all units.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • OpenSSL patches two high-severity flaws
    OpenSSL has released versions 1.0.2h and 1.0.1t of its open source cryptographic library, fixing multiple security vulnerabilities that can lead to traffic being decrypted, denial-of-service attacks, and arbitrary code execution. One of the high-severity vulnerabilities is actually a hybrid of two low-risk bugs and can cause OpenSSL to crash.
  • Linux Foundation Advances Security Efforts via Badging Program
    The Linux Foundation Core Infrastructure Initiative's badging program matures, as the first projects to achieve security badges are announced.
  • Linux Foundation tackles open source security with new badge program
  • WordPress Plugin ‘Ninja Forms’ Security Vulnerability
    FOSS Force has just learned from Wordfence, a security company that focuses on the open source WordPress content management platform, that a popular plugin used by over 500,000 sites, Ninja Forms, contains serious security vulnerabilities.
  • Preparing Your Network for the IoT Revolution
    While there is no denying that IP-based connectivity continues to become more and more pervasive, this is not a fundamentally new thing. What is new is the target audience is changing and connectivity is becoming much more personal. It’s no longer limited to high end technology consumers (watches and drones) but rather, it is showing up in nearly everything from children’s toys to kitchen appliances (yes again) and media devices. The purchasers of these new technology-enabled products are far from security experts, or even security aware. Their primary purchasing requirements are ease of use.
  • regarding embargoes
    Yesterday I jumped the gun committing some patches to LibreSSL. We receive advance copies of the advisory and patches so that when the new OpenSSL ships, we’re ready to ship as well. Between the time we receive advance notice and the public release, we’re supposed to keep this information confidential. This is the embargo. During the embargo time we get patches lined up and a source tree for each cvs branch in a precommit state. Then we wait with our fingers on the trigger. What happened yesterday was I woke up to a couple OpenBSD developers talking about the EBCDIC CVE. Oh, it’s public already? Check the OpenSSL git repo and sure enough, there are a bunch of commits for embargoed issues. Pull the trigger! Pull the trigger! Launch the missiles! Alas, we didn’t look closely enough at the exact issues fixed and had missed the fact that only low severity issues had been made public. The high severity issues were still secret. We were too hasty.
  • Medical Equipment Crashes During Heart Procedure Because of Antivirus Scan [Ed: Windows]
    A critical medical equipment crashed during a heart procedure due to a timely scan triggered by the antivirus software installed on the PC to which the said device was sending data for logging and monitoring.
  • Hotel sector faces cybercrime surge as data breaches start to bite
    Since 2014, things have become a lot more serious with a cross section of mostly US hotels suffering major breaches during Point-of-Sale (POS) terminals. Panda Security lists a string of attacks on big brands including on Trump Hotels, Hilton Worldwide, Hyatt, Starwood, Rosen Hotels & Resorts as well two separate attacks on hotel management outfit White Lodging and another on non-US hotel Mandarin Oriental.

Android Leftovers

today's howtos