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Linux

5 of the Best Laptops for Linux in 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Many laptops will run Linux, but that doesn’t mean you won’t run into issues. Chances are the newer the hardware, the more likely you are to have trouble with it. You can usually get things working, but there’s an easier way.

If you’re shopping for a laptop and know you’re planning to run Linux, you should keep this in mind. Instead of buying any laptop and hoping it will work, buy one you know will work.

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6-axis robotic arm runs on Raspberry Pi

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Linux

SB Components’ open-spec, Raspberry Pi powered “PiArm” robotic arm and gripper kit offers 6-axis digital servos and 360° rotation freedom.

SB Components has gone to Kickstarter to launch an open source hardware and software PiArm robotic arm kit aimed at the DIY maker and education markets. The PiArm starts at a super early bird price of 199 Pounds ($263) if you bring your own Raspberry Pi.

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Huawei’s plan to develop its own OS is an exercise in futility doomed to fail

Filed under
OS
Android
Linux

If it was already difficult to break up the duopoly back when Android and iOS were still at their weakest, how much more difficult would it be now that the two have become the de facto mobile platforms of the world? Even those like Sailfish OS or even Ubuntu Touch (via UBports) that continue to go against the flow eventually offer some layer to make enable Android apps to run on them.

So why not just based this “Kirin OS” on Android in the first place? Presuming that’s not what Huawei has done already anyway. The code is open source, or at least the core of it. Yes, there are a number of “nice to have” features available only under a proprietary license from Google, but there are examples of Android-based systems that eschew Google Play Services, like Amazon’s Fire OS or Yandex’s custom Android flavor.

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BMQ "BitMap Queue" Is The Newest Linux CPU Scheduler, Inspired By Google's Zircon

Filed under
Linux
Google

While there is the MuQSS CPU scheduler that lives out of tree as a promising CPU scheduler for the Linux kernel, it is not alone. Another option has been the PDS scheduler while now its author, Alfred Chen, has announced another new CPU kernel scheduler option he has dubbed the BitMap Queue.

The BMQ "BitMap Queue" scheduler started off from his existing PDS development experience and inspired by the scheduler found within Google's Zircon, the kernel powering their Fuchsia OS initiative.

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BackBox Linux for Penetration Testing

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Linux

Any given task can succeed or fail depending upon the tools at hand. For security engineers in particular, building just the right toolkit can make life exponentially easier. Luckily, with open source, you have a wide range of applications and environments at your disposal, ranging from simple commands to complicated and integrated tools.

The problem with the piecemeal approach, however, is that you might wind up missing out on something that can make or break a job… or you waste a lot of time hunting down the right tools for the job. To that end, it’s always good to consider an operating system geared specifically for penetration testing (aka pentesting).

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Best Linux Gaming Distros That Might Be Helpful

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

There are plenty of Linux operating systems available for the various purposes. Some of them are also available for the gaming purposes. There are plenty of beautiful Linux operating systems available for the gaming purpose.

Let’s check out some of the best Linux gaming distros that might be helpful and useful for you.

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Gaming Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Top 20 Best Tizen Apps for February 2019

Filed under
Linux

Here is our monthly roundup of Tizen Apps for your smartphone. Obviously, it needs to be a Tizen phone in order to be able to download these from the Tizen store. This list is the most downloaded apps or games during February 2019 as of the published date of 7 March 2019. These are for the Samsung Z1, Z2, Z3, and Z4 mobiles.

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Open-spec Nitrogen8M_Mini SBC ships along with new Mini-based SOM

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Boundary Devices has begun selling its open-spec, Linux-driven Nitrogen8M_Mini SBC starting at $135. It also announced a similarly i.MX8M Mini based Nitrogen8M_Mini SOM module with carrier.

Boundary Devices announced its Nitrogen8M_Mini a month ago and has now launched the SBC starting at $135. In early February, the Nitrogen8M_Mini was the only announced SBC with NXP’s quad -A53 i.MX8M Mini. Since then we’ve seen two modules available with carrier boards — Ka-Ro’s TX8M and CompuLab’s UCM-iMX8M-Mini. In addition, TechNexion recently pre-announced an upcoming Mini-based, Raspberry Pi-style AXON-Pi SBC and AXON-Neuron Mini-ITX board while also unveiling three i.MX8M Mini modules: the PICO-IMX8M-Mini, FLEX-IMX8M-Mini, and AXON-IMX8M-Mini.

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Also: Nerdy, Open Source 3D Printer Models

Secure Launch Boot Protocol Being Worked On For The Linux Kernel, Advancing TrenchBoot

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Linux

Up for discussion on the Linux kernel mailing list is adding support for the Secure Launch boot protocol to Linux. This is part of the recent efforts to supporting Linux in "secure" boot environments around Intel Trusted Execution Technology and AMD SKINIT platform security.

Developers from Oracle and other organizations have been working on Secure Launch and the open-source Trenchboot to allow Linux to be booted directly into a secure environment like Intel TXT (Trusted Execution Technology) and AMD SKINIT. Changes to the Linux kernel as well as the (GRUB) boot-loader are required.

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More in Tux Machines

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ First Impressions

I have always been curious about the tiny computer called Raspberry Pi but I didn’t have the time or opportunity to buy one until now. I got the latest version (Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+) along with bundled accessories from AliExpress for $65. I think it was a good deal considering what I got which I will explain to you later on. But before that and for your convenience, here are some quick facts about Raspberry Pi that I got from Wikipedia... Read more

GNOME Desktop: Parental Controls and More

  • Parental controls & metered data hackfest: days 1 & 2
    I’m currently at the Parental Controls & Metered Data hackfest at Red Hat’s office in London. A bunch of GNOME people from various companies (Canonical, Endless, elementary, and Red Hat) have gathered to work out a plan to start implementing these two features in GNOME. The first two days have been dedicated to the parental control features. This is the ability for parents to control what children can do on the computer. For example, locking down access to certain applications or websites. Day one began with presentations of the Endless OS implementation by Philip, followed by a demonstration of the Elementary version by Cassidy. Elementary were interested in potentially expanding this feature set to include something like Digital Wellbeing – we explored the distinction between this and parental controls. It turns out that these features are relatively similar – the main differences are whether you are applying restrictions to yourself or to someone else, and whether you have the ability to lift/ignore the restrictions. We’ve started talking about the latter of these as “speed bumps”: you can always undo your own restrictions, so the interventions from the OS should be intended to nudge you towards the right behaviour. After that we looked at some prior art (Android, iOS), and started to take the large list of potential features (in the image above) down to the ones we thought might be feasible to implement. Throughout all of this, one topic we kept coming back to was app lockdown. It’s reasonably simple to see how this could be applied to containerised apps (e.g. Snap or Flatpak), but system applications that come from a deb or an rpm are much more difficult. It would probably be possible – but still difficult – to use an LSM like AppArmor or SELinux to do this by denying execute access to the application’s binary. One obvious problem with that is that GNOME doesn’t require one of these and different distributions have made different choices here… Another tricky topic is how to implement website white/blacklisting in a robust way. We discussed using DNS (systemd-resolved?) and ip/nftables implementations, but it might turn out that the most feasible way is to use a browser extension for this.
  • GNOME ED Update – February
    Another update is now due from what we’ve been doing at the Foundation, and we’ve been busy! As you may have seen, we’ve hired three excellent people over the past couple of months. Kristi Progri has joined us as Program Coordinator, Bartłomiej Piorski as a devops sysadmin, and Emmanuele Bassi as our GTK Core developer. I hope to announce another new hire soon, so watch this space… There’s been quite a lot of discussion around the Google API access, and GNOME Online Accounts. The latest update is that I submitted the application to Google to get GOA verified, and we’ve got a couple of things we’re working through to get this sorted.

Android Leftovers

Managing changes in open source projects

Why bother having a process for proposing changes to your open source project? Why not just let people do what they're doing and merge the features when they're ready? Well, you can certainly do that if you're the only person on the project. Or maybe if it's just you and a few friends. But if the project is large, you might need to coordinate how some of the changes land. Or, at the very least, let people know a change is coming so they can adjust if it affects the parts they work on. A visible change process is also helpful to the community. It allows them to give feedback that can improve your idea. And if nothing else, it lets people know what's coming so that they can get excited, and maybe get you a little bit of coverage on Opensource.com or the like. Basically, it's "here's what I'm going to do" instead of "here's what I did," and it might save you some headaches as you scramble to QA right before your release. Read more