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Linux

Manjaro: User-Friendly Arch Linux for Everyone

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Linux
Reviews

Arch Linux has never been known as a user-friendly Linux distribution. In fact, the whole premise of Arch requires the end user make a certain amount of effort in understanding how the system works. Arch even goes so far as to use a package manager (aptly named, Pacman) designed specifically for the platform. That means all that apt-get and dnf knowledge you have doesn’t necessarily roll over.

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ELKDAT Tool Released To Ease Linux Kernel Development & Testing

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Development
Linux

ELKDAT is a new Linux kernel project to provide an easy kernel development and testing tool.

ELKDAT is capable of automatically setting up the Linux kernel source repository and a VM for development and testing. With a single command it can build/install/boot any custom kernel build, run a given set of tests on the kernel, tests all the patches in a patch-set, and have automated bisecting using the virtual machine.

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Microsoft Hates Linux: Got Caught, Pretended Just an Accident

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Detailed change log for deepin 15.4 RC

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GNU
Linux

deepin is a Linux distribution devoted to providing beautiful, easy to use, safe and reliable system for global users.

After public test of deepin 15.4 Beta, we have received a lot of suggestions and feedback, we adopted part of them and fixed a lot of problems.

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Microsoft Loves Microsoft

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Microsoft’s OneDrive performance on Linux is causing quite a storm

    Since Microsoft has been under the stewardship of Satya Nadella, the software giant has been embracing Linux in various different ways – ‘new Microsoft, new attitude’, as we observed a year ago – but not when it comes to OneDrive, it would seem.

    As the Register reports, there are a good number of users complaining about the poor performance of the OneDrive web app on their Linux machines (or other non-Windows platforms like Chromebooks).

    The interesting point here is that when using a Windows PC on the exact same connection with the OneDrive app, everything runs smooth and fast.

  • Microsoft loves Linux so much, its OneDrive web app runs like a dog on Windows OS rivals

    Ever since Satya Nadella took over the reins at Microsoft, the Windows giant has been talking up how much it loves Linux – but it appears this hasn't trickled down to its OneDrive team.

    Plenty of Linux users are up in arms about the performance of the OneDrive web app. They say that when accessing Microsoft's cloudy storage system in a browser on a non-Windows system – such as on Linux or ChromeOS – the service grinds to a barely usable crawl. But when they use a Windows machine on the same internet connection, speedy access resumes.

    Crucially, when they change their browser's user-agent string – a snippet of text the browser sends to websites describing itself – to Internet Explorer or Edge, magically their OneDrive access speeds up to normal on their non-Windows PCs.

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Intel Has More P-State Changes Coming For Linux 4.12

    Tuning the P-State CPU frequency scaling driver for the Linux kernel feels like a never-ending process. While it's been around for years and continues to be refined, for some Intel CPUs on some workloads, the CPUFreq scaling driver leads to be better performance and even Intel's own Clear Linux distribution is using CPUFreq by default. With Linux 4.12, more intel_pstate revisions are taking place.

  • Intel's Vulkan Driver Working On VK_KHX_multiview Support

    Intel's open-source "ANV" Vulkan Linux driver is prepping support for the experimental VK_KHX_multiview extension.

    Key Intel Vulkan driver contributor Jason Ekstrand has published his initial patches for VK_KHX_multiview support within the ANV code-base. This also includes SPIR-V support for the related SPV_KHR_multiview extension.

  • Mir's Abstraction Layer Now Has Cut & Paste Support (MirAL)

    A few days ago we reported on Ubuntu's Mir now supporting drag and drop while now another important desktop feature has come to Ubuntu's Mir abstraction layer, MirAL.

  • DRM Core Updates For HDMI 2.0+ Features

    Synopsys has been working on some DRM core infrastructure patches for better handling of HDMI 2.0+ support by DRM drivers.

Embarcadero’s RAD Studio 10.2 released with Linux support

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Linux

Embarcadero wants to help developers build cross-platform native apps faster with the latest release of its RAD Studio. According to the company RAD Studio 10.2 is a milestone release with Linux support, improved IDE menus, new features, and enhanced C++ performance.

The latest version features its first LLVM-based Linux compiler for enterprise development. The Delphi Linux compiler is designed to help developers take new and existing Windows server apps and target Linux servers, according to the company. The Linux compiler features full file system support, threads and parallel programing library, and FireDAC database access support.

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Boards With Linux

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Linux
Hardware
  • Latest Linux Maker Boards Gamble on Diversity

    As usual, last week’s Embedded World show in Nuremberg, Germany was primarily focused on commercial embedded single board computers (SBCs), computer-on-modules, and rugged industrial systems for the OEM market. Yet, we also saw a growing number of community-backed maker boards, which, like most of the commercial boards, run Linux. The new crop shows the growing diversity of hacker SBCs, which range from completely open source models to proprietary prototyping boards that nevertheless offer low prices and community services such as forums and open source Linux distributions.

  • Rugged, expandable 3.5-inch Skylake SBC supports Linux

    Diamond’s 3.5-inch “Venus” SBC offers an Intel 6th Gen CPU, -40 to 85°C support, up to 20GB of ruggedized RAM, and mini-PCIe and PCIe/104 OneBank.

  • How enthusiasts designed a powerful desktop PC with an ARM processor

    The purpose of the gathering was to get the ball rolling for the development of a real desktop based on ARM. The PC will likely be developed by 96boards, which provides specifications to build open-source development boards.

Kernel Space/Linux

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Linux

GNU/Linux Games and Wine

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GNU
Linux
Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Someone is putting lots of work into hacking Github developers [Ed: Dan Goodin doesn't know that everything is under attack and cracking attempts just about all the time?]
    Open-source developers who use Github are in the cross-hairs of advanced malware that has steal passwords, download sensitive files, take screenshots, and self-destruct when necessary.
  • Security Orchestration and Incident Response
    Technology continues to advance, and this is all a changing target. Eventually, computers will become intelligent enough to replace people at real-time incident response. My guess, though, is that computers are not going to get there by collecting enough data to be certain. More likely, they'll develop the ability to exhibit understanding and operate in a world of uncertainty. That's a much harder goal. Yes, today, this is all science fiction. But it's not stupid science fiction, and it might become reality during the lifetimes of our children. Until then, we need people in the loop. Orchestration is a way to achieve that.

Leftover: Development (Linux)

  • Swan: Better Linux on Windows
    If you are a Linux user that has to use Windows — or even a Windows user that needs some Linux support — Cygwin has long been a great tool for getting things done. It provides a nearly complete Linux toolset. It also provides almost the entire Linux API, so that anything it doesn’t supply can probably be built from source. You can even write code on Windows, compile and test it and (usually) port it over to Linux painlessly.
  • Lint for Shell Scripters
    It used to be one of the joys of writing embedded software was never having to deploy shell scripts. But now with platforms like the Raspberry Pi becoming very common, Linux shell scripts can be a big part of a system–even the whole system, in some cases. How do you know your shell script is error-free before you deploy it? Of course, nothing can catch all errors, but you might try ShellCheck.
  • Android: Enabling mainline graphics
    Android uses the HWC API to communicate with graphics hardware. This API is not supported on the mainline Linux graphics stack, but by using drm_hwcomposer as a shim it now is. The HWC (Hardware Composer) API is used by SurfaceFlinger for compositing layers to the screen. The HWC abstracts objects such as overlays and 2D blitters and helps offload some work that would normally be done with OpenGL. SurfaceFlinger on the other hand accepts buffers from multiple sources, composites them, and sends them to the display.
  • Collabora's Devs Make Android's HWC API Work in Mainline Linux Graphics Stack
    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today about the latest work done by various Collabora developers in collaboration with Google's ChromeOS team to enable mainline graphics on Android. The latest blog post published by Collabora's Robert Foss reveals the fact that both team managed to develop a shim called drm_hwcomposer, which should enable Android's HWC (Hardware Composer) API to communicate with the graphics hardware, including Android 7.0's version 2 HWC API.

today's howtos

Reports From and About Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)