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Ten Years After Part III - A Storied Conclusion

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Old habits are indeed hard to break, and especially if you don't really understand the reason why those habits have to change. The idea of a software repository just didn't make sense to most of our Reglue kids at first. I cannot count the times when I went to troubleshoot a problem on a Reglue computer to find the desktop riddled with .exe files of failed installations.

What isn't really surprising is that the kids did eventually pick up the whole installation process on their Linux machines, and mostly came to prefer it. But the parents? Not so much. I wish I had recorded some of the calls I got from irate parents or guardians because they couldn't install XYZ software on the computer. It didn't take me long to make sure to make sure that Mom or Dad were present when I explained that part during the orientation. At times, I had to remind those adults that the computer and software was engineered for the benefit of the student, not as a household computer. I mean, get TurboTax on your own machine. It helped some, but still....Adults, right?

[...]

By far the most vocal complaints concerned "needed" software not being available on Linux. We might as well just call out The Terrible Two. Photoshop and Microsoft Office. Now remember, the bulk of my work was done between 2005 and 2009. I never offered any excuses for Photoshop. The Gimp isn't Photoshop, no matter how you twist or turn it and trying to tell someone who uses Photoshop scholastically or professionally that The Gimp can replace Photoshop is a fools errand. Sure it can do a lot of what Photoshop can do but it's those pesky little items that The Gimp lacks that everyone got all bunched up over.

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Rugged computers run Linux on Jetson TX2 and Xavier

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Linux

Aitech is offering RedHawk Linux RTOS for its rugged, compact, Jetson TX2-based A176 Cyclone and new A177 Twister systems. There’s also a similar new Jetson Xavier based A178 Thunder computer.

Aitech, which has been producing embedded Linux-driven systems for military/aerospace and rugged industrial applications since at least 2004, announced that Concurrent Real-Time’s hardened RedHawk Linux RTOS will be available on two Linux-ready embedded systems based on the Nvidia Jetson TX2 module. With Redhawk Linux standing in for the default Nvidia Linux4Tegra stack, the military-grade A176 Cyclone and recently released, industrial-focused A177 Twister systems can “enhance real-time computing for mission-critical applications,” says Aitech.

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Linux Devices: Orchard Audio, Seco and Ubuntu Core

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Linux
  • Raspberry Pi based audio DAC board starts at $225

    Orchard Audio’s $225 “PecanPi” audio DAC add-on for the Raspberry Pi and $400, Pi-equipped “Streamer” system features 24-bit, 192kHz sampling, 130dB SNR, and -110dB THD+N.

    Orchard Audio has opened pre-orders on a next-gen PecanPi audio DAC board for the Raspberry Pi that replaces its earlier, Kickstarter backed ApplePi DAC. The $225 PecanPi DAC offers modest audio improvements, as well as more options that can be be added a la carte all the way up to a $400 PecanPi Streamer system with aluminum case and Raspberry Pi. Shipments are expected between June and August.

  • 3.5-inch i.MX8M SBC focuses on A/V

    Seco’s 3.5-inch “SBC-C20” runs Linux on a dual- or quad-core -A53 i.MX8M SoC with up to 2GB RAM and 16GB eMMC plus 4K-ready eDP or HDMI 2.0, M.2 expansion, and optional -40 to 85°C.

    The SBC-C20 is the third and final SBC announced by Seco at Embedded World. It’s not as fast as the i.MX8 QuadMax based SBC-C43 and not quite as customizable as the i.MX8M Mini powered SBC-C61, but considering the widespread availability of the well-traveled i.MX8M, it’s likely to ship sooner than its siblings. The media-rich, 3.5-inch SBC targets “cost-effective solutions in the multimedia field as well as for IIoT applications.”

  • The path to Ubuntu Core

    At Canonical, helping customers overcome their challenges is what we do every day. In the IoT world, a common challenge we encounter is customers who are interested in transitioning to Ubuntu Core and the snapcraft.io ecosystem, but are unsure how to begin. This post covers the recommended approach.

    In most cases, it’s relatively easy for someone to see the advantages of Ubuntu Core when they’re first introduced to it. The transactional updates, immutable system design, simplified development and powerful update controls have most people going “you had me at transactional!”

    However, we all know the devil’s in the details. Shortly after the “eureka!” moment, there is often an anticlimax, as the newly minted Ubuntu Core believer starts to consider their current product state. For teams of harried software developers on a fixed budget, both in terms of time and money, making changes to the underlying components can feel impossible. Staring down the barrel of one or more projects with aggressive delivery schedules, the last thing you want to do is start changing things. To borrow from a quote often attributed to Walt Kelly, updating your device OS and packaging platform can feel like an “insurmountable opportunity.”

MATE 1.22 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After about a year of development, the MATE Desktop team have finally released MATE 1.22. A big thank you to all contributors who helped to make this happen.

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Also: MATE Desktop discussion forums are closing

Forbes Says The Raspberry Pi Is Big Business

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Not that it’s something the average Hackaday reader is unaware of, but the Raspberry Pi is a rather popular device. While we don’t have hard numbers to back it up (extra credit for anyone who wishes to crunch the numbers), it certainly seems a day doesn’t go by that there isn’t a Raspberry Pi story on the front page. But given that a small, cheap, relatively powerful, Linux computer was something the hacking community had dreamed of for years, it’s hardly surprising.

[...]

So where has the Pi been seen punching a clock? At Sony, for a start. The consumer electronics giant has been installing Pis in several of their factories to monitor various pieces of equipment. They record everything from temperature to vibration and send that to a centralized server using an in-house developed protocol. Some of the Pis are even equipped with cameras which feed into computer vision systems to keep an eye out for anything unusual.

[Parmy] also describes how the Raspberry Pi is being used in Africa to monitor the level of trash inside of garbage bins and automatically dispatch a truck to come pick it up for collection. In Europe, they’re being used to monitor the health of fueling stations for hydrogen powered vehicles. All over the world, businesses are realizing they can build their own monitoring systems for as little as 1/10th the cost of turn-key systems; with managers occasionally paying for the diminutive Linux computers out of their own pocket.

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New Screencasts: Xubuntu 18.04.2, Ubuntu MATE, and Rosa Fresh 11

Filed under
GNU
Linux

9 Admirable Graphical File Managers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Being able to navigate your local filesystem is an important function of personal computing. File managers have come a long way since early directory editors like DIRED. While they aren’t cutting-edge technology, they are essential software to manage any computer.

File management consists of creating, opening, renaming, moving / copying, deleting and searching for files. But file managers also frequently offer other functionality.

In the field of desktop environments, there are two desktops that dominate the open source landscape: KDE and GNOME. They are smart, stable, and generally stay out of the way. These use the widget toolkits Qt and GTK respectively. And there are many excellent Qt and GTK file managers available. We covered the finest in our Qt File Managers Roundup and GTK File Managers Roundup. But with Linux, you’re never short of alternatives.

There are many graphical non-Qt and non-Gtk file managers available. This article examines 9 such file managers. The quality is remarkably good.

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Canonical Releases Important Linux Kernel Patch for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Update Now

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

The new Linux kernel security update is here to address five security issues discovered by various security researchers in the Linux 4.4 kernel used in the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series and official derivatives that aren't using the Linux 4.15 HWE (Hardware Enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver).

These include a flaw (CVE-2017-18241) in Linux kernel's F2FS file system implementation, which incorrectly handled the noflush_merge mount option, and multiple integer overflows (CVE-2018-7740) in the hugetlbfs implementation. Both issues could allow local attackers to crash the vulnerable system through a denial of service.

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Fedora 29 Linux Gaming Report: The Nvidia, Radeon And Steam User Experience

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Gaming on Linux. Depending on who you talk to, getting stuff like Steam up and running and graphics drivers installed can be a tedious exercise, or ridiculously straightforward. That's because people don't really game on Linux. They game on Fedora, Manjaro, Ubuntu, Deepin, Solus. They game on Debian-based distributions or Arch-based distributions. Each with their own philosophies on free (as in open source and freely distributed) versus non-free (Steam and proprietary Nvidia drivers) software. Each with their own approaches to stability, affecting which versions of drivers are available out of the box.

While there are certain procedures and best practices that persist across any distro, the variances can be daunting for new users. And that's the jumping-off point for this series.

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Top 5 Reasons Why You Should Use Fedora Linux

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

These are some of the major reasons why you should use Fedora. It might not be popular as Ubuntu or comes with advanced tools by default as Kali Linux or user-friendly as Linux Mint, but it has a solid base when it comes to latest features and security. Another fact is, anyone, can build a Linux distribution but you should not use one run by a single or few people. Fedora is backed by RedHat, one of the most reputable names in Linux industry and hence you will have peace of mind.

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Programming: C++, Python and In-house OpenJDK Implementation of Alibaba

  • Next C++ workshop: Pointers and Linked Lists, 28 March at 19:00 UTC
    Another workshop is coming up! Improve your C++ skills with the help of LibreOffice developers: we’re running regular workshops which focus on a specific topic, and are accompanied by a real-time IRC meeting. For the next one, the topics are Pointers and Linked Lists. Start by watching this presentation:
  • Python programming language: Pyboard D-series arrives for MicroPython robots
    The new Pyboard D-series micro-controller is now available for purchase at a rather hefty price of £43 ($56), offering developers a low-powered device for running programs created with MicroPython, a stripped-back version of the hugely popular Python 3 programming language.
  • Commenting Python Code
    Programming reflects your way of thinking in order to describe the single steps that you took to solve a problem using a computer. Commenting your code helps explain your thought process, and helps you and others to understand later on the intention of your code. This allows you to more easily find errors, to fix them, to improve the code later on, and to reuse it in other applications as well. Commenting is important to all kinds of projects, no matter whether they are - small, medium, or rather large. It is an essential part of your workflow, and is seen as good practice for developers. Without comments, things can get confusing, real fast. In this article we will explain the various methods of commenting Python supports, and how it can be used to automatically create documentation for your code using the so-called module-level docstrings.
  • Documenting Python Projects With Sphinx and Read The Docs
  • Django Migrations 101
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #361 (March 26, 2019)
  • MongoDB connections
  • Alibaba Dragonwell8 : The In-house OpenJDK Implementation At Alibaba
    Alibaba requires no introduction. It is one of the popular and largest multinational conglomerate founded by Jack Ma, a business magnate and philanthropist from China. It is also world’s fifth-largest internet company by revenue. It specializes in various sectors such as e-commerce, retail, Internet and technology. Alibaba team has provided significant contribution to open source projects. One such project is OpenJDK. The development team at Alibaba has developed many Java-based applications over the years. They have adopted OpenJDK and created their own JDK named “Alibaba Dragonwell8”. It is the downstream version of OpenJDK and completely open source. Alibaba Dragonwell is optimized for developing e-commerce, financial, logistics applications which are running on their 100k+ servers. It is certified as compatible with the Java SE standard. It is currently supports Linux/x86_64 platform only. Let us hope they will extend the support to Unix and other platforms soon. In this guide, we will see how to install Alibaba Dragonwell8 in Linux. I have tested this guide on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS server. However, it should work on other Linux distributions as well.

4MLinux 29.0 BETA released.

4MLinux 29.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages. Read more

Why We Need Our Nonprofits

SPARC was at best a relatively small success. But RISC did succeed, massively, with ARM (which stands for Advanced RISC Machine). ARM started as the Acorn RISC Machine in 1983. Today, most of the world's mobile devices run ARM chips. I don't know how well the CHIPS Alliance will do, but I do know that only an entity big and experienced enough to pull giant competing companies together can do it. For Linux, that's the Linux Foundation. I'm glad we have it. I'm also glad we have the Software Freedom Conservancy. Times are getting tough for FLOSS, and we need all the help we can get. Read more

See GNOME 3.32 on Ubuntu 19.04 Beta

Although the 19.04 is still not officially released this March, but even today we can download the development version and run it (LiveCD) on our computer. We find that it includes the 3.32, the latest version of GNOME desktop environment. I want to highlight some interesting aspects of it on Ubuntu as we saw it on Fedora Rawhide few days ago. I suggest you to download the 19.04 daily-live ISO and quickly test it, I believe you can feel the performance improvements especially how quick it's now to open the start menu and it's now even quicker to search files on Nautilus. Here we go. Happy testing! Read more