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Alienware: Steam Machine owners will "sacrifice content" for the sake of Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

It’s been tough to parse Alienware’s position on the Linux-based SteamOS. At E3 they told us that the Steam Machine will increase Linux gamers by “20, 30 fold, overnight”. But with the first Steam Machines delayed into 2015, they’ve upstaged their own Linux box with a Windows-based living room PC: the Alienware Alpha.

So who would win in a fight, Alienware? A living room PC running Windows, or the same PC running SteamOS?

“It depends on what you’re looking for; there’s advantages to both,” said Alienware general manager Frank Azor. “[With] the Linux version I do think you’re going to sacrifice a little bit of content.”

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The Justice League of Linux: If Distros Were Superheroes Ubuntu Would Be Superman

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

It’s an obvious comparison: both Ubuntu and Superman are leaders, they are dependable, and they are arguably the most well known of their kind. Both are security minded and concerned with privacy, while Canonical’s laser-like focus in pursuit of convergence is nearly as intense as the red-hot beam fired out of Superman’s eyes!

Powerful, upfront and well intentioned (sometimes to a fault) the famous Linux distribution has much in common with the most famous superhero of all time.

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Btrfs Gets Talked Up, Googler Encourages You To Try Btrfs

Filed under
Linux
Google

This week at LinuxCon North America in Chicago is a presentation by Google's Marc Merlin that's entitled "Why you should consider using btrfs, real COW snapshots and file level incremental server OS upgrades like Google does." The presentation does a good job at looking at the state of Btrfs on Linux and comparing it to ZFS.

Marc Merlin, a Linux admin at Google for more than one decade, is presenting on Thursday at LinuxCon Chicago about Btrfs. His slides are already available for those that can't make it to the windy city or are looking for an overview of what he'll be discussing.

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Kids Are Learning to Code With a Slice of Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Development
Linux

Raspberry Pi is a credit card-size computer that can function like a basic PC when plugged into a monitor and keyboard. It can record videos and power drones, but developer Eben Upton says his goal was to teach basic programming skills to students as young as 8.

The small computer, sold by the nonprofit Raspberry Pi Foundation, is a small green board covered in metal ports. It’s light, delicate, and fits in the palm of your hand. Once it’s plugged into a keyboard and monitor, a user can write and tweak code as with any PC. The latest model, B+, has 10 operating systems to choose from, with varying learning curves.

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Need a Cheap Chromebook? Here’s How to Pick One

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Instead of running Windows, these lightweight, inexpensive notebooks are based entirely on Google’s Chrome web browser. So while you can’t install traditional programs such as Office and Photoshop, you can use web-based substitutes like the free Office Online and Pixlr. In exchange, you’ll get a computer that boots up quickly, is safe from viruses, doesn’t have any obnoxious bloatware and is optimized for browsing the web.

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Younger generation driving Linux take-up, says Canadian vendor

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A Canadian technology company has started shipping notebooks and laptops loaded with Linux due to demand from the younger generation, the owner of the company says.

Braden Taylor of Eurocom, a company based in Ontario, said he shipped systems all over the world, including to Australia.

"We are finding that more and more of the younger generation are moving to Linux for a variety of reasons," he said, in response to queries.

"We are getting more and more inquiries about Ubuntu and Mint from the younger generation all over the world. They like that it is a low-cost alternative."

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HandyLinux 1.6 - A sample of what you can achieve using the power of Debian

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
Debian

HandyLinux was created using the Debian Live Build tools. This distribution shows you a small sample of what can be achieved with Debian.

HandyLinux was reasonably easy to install and there is a decent if not spectacular set of applications installed by default.

The HandyMenu will probably be useful for people who want a basic computing experience but for everyone else there is the inclusion of Whisker and Slingscold.

Using Debian Wheezy as a base makes the system a little bit limited in terms of available software. I would recommend using the testing branch as a base.

There were a couple of issues as highlighted but nothing too hard to fix. It would probably be a bit disconcerting for a really new user to hit the menu icon and for nothing to happen.

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Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code

Filed under
Development
Linux
Security

Beginning on Monday, the security of the Linux kernel source code has become a little bit tighter with the addition of two-factor authentication for the kernel's Git code repositories.

Contributing code changes to the Linux kernel sources at Kernel.org already required more than just a password, even before the change. Developers must use their own unique SSH public keys to login to the Git repositories. But not even this added security layer was truly failsafe – as the software's maintainers found out in 2011 when their servers were rooted.

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Loving Linux: Ain't Nothin' Like the 1st Time

Filed under
Linux

"My first real exposure to Linux was at a friend's house," said Linux Rants blogger Mike Stone. "He was trying to make a Macintosh he owned into a useful computer, so he'd dual-booted it with a version of Linux called MkLinux. I was absolutely fascinated by it and the FOSS philosophy, and after using his computer for a week or so, I looked into getting Linux [on] my own."

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Top Linux Productivity Apps

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Productivity is essential to anyone's day, no matter who you are or where you work. In this article, I'll be sharing some of my favorite Linux applications that I rely on to keep my productivity levels in check. I'll also share some of my rationale behind me recommending each application and why you might wish to consider it as well.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux tutorial website

Hi guys, here you have a website that covers Linux basics: http://linux-bible.com. Most of the examples are from Ubuntu.

Today in Techrights

Edubuntu Vs UberStudent: Return To College With The Best Linux Distro

Importantly, there are a handful of programs that are on Edubuntu that UberStudent doesn’t have, such as KAlgebra, Kazium, KGeography, and Marble. Instead, UberStudent has a smaller collection of applications but it does include some useful items when it comes to writing papers that Edubuntu does not have. So ultimately, Edubuntu includes more programs that are information-heavy, while UberStudent includes more tools that can aid students in their studies but doesn’t directly give them any sort of information. Read more

Zotac Nvidia Jetson TK1 review

The Jetson TK1, Nvidia’s first development board to be marketed at the general public, has taken a circuitous route to our shores. Unveiled at the company’s Graphics Technology Conference earlier this year, the board launched in the US at a headline-grabbing price of $192 but its international release was hampered by export regulations. Zotac, already an Nvidia partner for its graphics hardware, volunteered to sort things out and has partnered with Maplin to bring the board to the UK. In doing so, however, the price has become a little muddled. $192 – a clever dollar per GPU core – has become £199.99. Compared to Maplin’s other single-board computer, the sub-£30 Raspberry Pi, it’s a high-end item that could find itself priced out of the reach of the company’s usual customers. Read more