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RaspArch Project Now Lets You Run Arch Linux on Your Raspberry Pi 4 Computer

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Linux

RaspArch Build 190809 is now available to download and it is especially made for the recently released Raspberry Pi 4 Model B computer, which features a Quad-Core 1.5GHz 64-bit ARM Cortex-A72 CPU, up to 4GB RAM, and on-board dual-band 802.11 b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 5.0 (BLE).

The best thing about the new Raspberry Pi 4 model is that it supports up to 4K video resolutions via two micro HDMI ports. The tiny computer also comes with two USB 3.0 and USB 2.0 ports, an extended 40-pin GPIO header, MIPI Camera and Display ports, and true Gigabit Ethernet.

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Linux package managers are slow

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Linux

I measured how long the most popular Linux distribution’s package manager take to install small and large packages (the ack(1p) source code search Perl script and qemu, respectively).

Where required, my measurements include metadata updates such as transferring an up-to-date package list. For me, requiring a metadata update is the more common case, particularly on live systems or within Docker containers.

All measurements were taken on an Intel(R) Core(TM) i9-9900K CPU @ 3.60GHz running Docker 1.13.1 on Linux 4.19, backed by a Samsung 970 Pro NVMe drive boasting many hundreds of MB/s write performance.

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Also: a Linux distribution to research fast package management

[EndeavourOS] The August release is available.

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GNU
Linux

This ISO contains:

Calamares 3.2.11 (the latest version of our installer)
Kernel 5.2.8
mesa 19.1.4-1
systemd 242.84-1
xf86-video-nouveau 1.0.16-1
XFCE 4.14
bash-completion
broadcom-wl-dkms
We also took care of some bug fixes:

Autologin is working now (if chosen inside Calamares)
Virtualbox detection is working
Powersaving/screen-locking issues are resolved
Added Leafpad as an option to use the editor as admin (not working with mousepad anymore)
A general cleanup
Removed light-locker (was causing issues)

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Emmabuntus DE2 1.05 Released, Which Reduces ISO Image Size

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Emmabuntus Team is pleased to announce the release of the new Emmabuntüs Debian Edition 2 1.05 (32 and 64 bits) on 02nd Aug, 2019.

It’s based on Debian 9.9 stretch distribution and featuring the XFCE desktop environment.

This is a lightweight distribution, which was designed to run on older computers.

This distribution was originally designed to facilitate the reconditioning of computers donated to humanitarian organizations, starting with the Emmaüs communities.

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Rust will offer refunds as they stop shipping Linux client

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Multiplayer survival game Rust will soon stop shipping its Linux client and offer refunds to those who have played using it. They’ve penned a blog post explaining that it had become a “cheater’s sanctuary,” and that a September update addressing performance and security not being supported on the OS was the final straw, despite believing that supporting Linux is still “the right thing to do.”

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10 Best Terminal emulators for Linux that are worth giving a try

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GNU
Linux

Terminal emulator on a Linux system does not need any introduction. It is one of the most important tools in a Linux system, all users know about. The Terminal emulator on Linux can be useful for installing a program, changing some system settings, opening a program or run any script and do any other small and big tasks on a Linux computer with just the appropriate command. Thus, it will not be wrong, if you call it the heart of a Linux system from a user’s perspective. Just like most other elements in a Linux system, a new Terminal emulator can also be installed and used.

So, without any further delay, let’s get started with the top 10 alternatives to the default Linux Terminal emulator and the reasons you should opt for them.

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The New Firmware Manager: Updating firmware across Linux distributions

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GNU
Linux

Over the past few months, System76 has been developing a simple, easy-to-use tool for updating firmware on Pop!_OS and System76 hardware. Today, we’re excited to announce that you can now check and update firmware through Settings on Pop!_OS, and through the firmware manager GTK application on System76 hardware running other Debian-based distributions.

One of the issues we faced with with firmware management on Linux was the lack of options for graphical frontends to firmware management services like fwupd and system76-firmware. For fwupd, the only solutions available were to distribute either GNOME Software or KDE Discover, which is not viable for Linux distributions which have their own application centers, or frontends to package managers. For system76-firmware, an official GTK application existed, but it only supported updating System76 firmware, when it would be more ideal if it could support updating firmware from both services.

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Also: System76 Unveils Their Firmware Manager Project For Graphically Updating Firmware

Linux 5.4 To Expose What's Keeping The System Awake Via Sysfs

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Linux

The next Linux kernel version will expose the real-time sources of what's keeping the system awake via Sysfs compared to existing source information that previously was only available via DebugFS.

With Linux 5.4, wakeup source statistics will now be exposed under /sys/class/wakeup/wakeup*/ for tracking wakeups, their counts, and related bits for profiling the system for power usage optimizations.

Suspend-blocking wakeup sources have been available under DebugFS to be useful for bug reporting and analyzing battery consumption. This solidifies the work now under Sysfs with a stable ABI. In addition to the interfaces now stable in adding them to sysfs, it makes them more accessible compared to DebugFS often being restricted to root or other restrictions in place by different distribution kernels.

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Videos: Pardus and Linux Action News

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GNU
Linux

Jetson Nano based robotics kit connects to SparkFun sensors

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Linux

SparkFun has launched a version of Nvidia’s Jetson Nano based JetBot AI Kit robotics kit equipped with its Qwiic pHat, a wide-angle camera, and more. Also new: a SparkFun DLI Kit for Jetson Nano to use in conjunction with an Nvidia AI course.

When Nvidia launched its Linux-powered Jetson Nano module and $99 Jetson Nano Development Kit in March, it posted specs and instructions on GitHub for using the kit to build out a mobile JetBot robot. In late July, Waveshare launched a JetBot AI Kit based on the design available with ($216) or without ($100) the Nano Dev Kit. Now SparkFun has released a more advanced — and expensive — version of the open source robotics kit selling for $275 with the Nano Dev Kit or $175 without. SparkFun also launched a SparkFun DLI Kit for Jetson Nano focused on deep learning (see farther below).

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The Linux kernel: Top 5 innovations

The word innovation gets bandied about in the tech industry almost as much as revolution, so it can be difficult to differentiate hyperbole from something that’s actually exciting. The Linux kernel has been called innovative, but then again it’s also been called the biggest hack in modern computing, a monolith in a micro world. Setting aside marketing and modeling, Linux is arguably the most popular kernel of the open source world, and it’s introduced some real game-changers over its nearly 30-year life span. Read more

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Removing Qt 4 from Ubuntu before the 20.04 release

I would like to completely remove Qt 4 from the Ubuntu archive before the 20.04 release. This includes all of KDE 4 and dependencies. The Debian Qt/KDE Team (which I am a part of) is raising the status of the Qt 4 removal bugs to RC[1], and since the Qt 6 work is starting upstream in the dev branch in the coming months, now is the time for Qt 4 to go. My timeline for this is to change all of the bugs filed to ask people to port[2] to removal bugs, and go over the list of Qt 4 reverse dependencies one last time, so the removal can be done at the beginning of the 20.04 cycle before the archive opens. This would make 19.10 the last release with Qt 4. Read more Also: Ubuntu Planning To Drop Qt4 & Its Dependencies Ahead Of 20.04 LTS