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Comparing Search between Nautilus and Nemo File Managers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

Personally, I like Nemo search better than Nautilus search as I need to sort everything I find and I cannot do that with Nautilus. I love sort by Date/Descending as I use it everyday.

Apparently, not only me saying this. I don't know why this once-existed feature removed in current versions of Nautilus, as normal interface provides sorting but search interface does not. I will not wonder if somebody ask "why not removing sort in the normal interface as well?" or such.

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Set up a static network connection in Linux

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Linux
HowTos

Configuring a network connection from a Linux machine can be challenging. Fortunately, many new Linux distributions come with some type of network management tool that can help you automatically connect to a wireless network. But wouldn't it be nice to be able to set up a static network connection from a Linux machine? This guide will show you how to use different Linux tools to check for network connections from a CentOS/RHEL machine and explain how to add a static network using the nmcli tool.

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Linux distros without systemd

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If you are reading this post you're very much likely not a fan of systemd already. So we won't preach on why systemd is bad, but today we'll focus more on what are the alternatives out there. Our approach is obviously not for settling for less but for changing things for the better. We have started the world after systemd project some time ago and the search isn't over.

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Discussion: Linux Distros Without Systemd (2019)

Four new Arduino Nano boards break price/performance/size barriers

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Linux

Arduino expanded its line of 45 x 18mm Nano boards with a $10 “Arduino Nano Every” model, a faster WiFi/BT-enabled IoT model, and two BLE boards. The new models offer price, performance, and size improvements over earlier Arduinos.

At the start of this weekend’s Bay Area Maker Faire, which could be its last in that locale (see farther below), Arduino opened pre-orders for four new 45 x 18mm Nano form-factor boards to join its earlier, Nano 3. Shipments are due in mid-June for the Arduino Nano Every replacement for the Nano 3, as well as the higher-end, WiFi-enabled Nano 33 IoT. There’s a mid-July ship date for the Bluetooth-equipped Nano 33 BLE and Nano 33 BLE Sense wearable modules.

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4 New Arduino Nano Boards Are Here: More Powerful Than Before

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The open source Arduino Project was started long back in 2003 as a program for students to help them tinker with sensors and their applications without spending tons of money. Over the course of time, this open source platform evolved and facilitated the launch of various versions of the Arduino hardware.

Adding another chapter to Arduino’s hardware journey, the Italian boardmakers have announced the launch of four new products that will remind you of the classic Arduino Nano 3. The 4 Arduino product in the lineup serve different purposes, so let’s briefly tell you about them:

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Direct: What’s new at Maker Faire Bay Area 2019

Kernel: Ted Tso is Switching to Hugo, Linux's vmalloc Seeing "Large Performance Benefits" With 5.2 Kernel Changes

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Linux
  • Ted Tso: Switching to Hugo

    With the demise of Google+, I’ve decided to try to resurrect my blog. Previously, I was using Wordpress, but I’ve decided that it’s just too risky from a security perspective. So I’ve decided my blog over to Hugo.

    A consequence of this switch is that all of the Wordpress comments have been dropped, at least for now.

  • Linux's vmalloc Seeing "Large Performance Benefits" With 5.2 Kernel Changes

    On top of all the changes queued for Linux 5.2 is an interesting last-minute performance improvement for the vmalloc code.

    The Linux kernel's vmalloc code has the potential of performing much faster on Linux 5.2, particularly with embedded devices. Vmalloc is used for allocating contiguous memory in the virtual address space and saw a nice optimization merged today on the expected final day of the Linux 5.2 merge window.

Linux kernel RDS flaw affects Red Hat, Ubuntu, Debian and SUSE

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Linux

If you're not in the habit of keeping up to date with the latest version of the Linux kernel, now might be a good time to think about doing so. Systems based on versions of the kernel older than 5.0.8 suffer from a severe flaw in the implementation of RDS over TCP.

Left unpatched, the flaw could enable an attacker to compromise a system. The National Vulnerability Database entry says: "There is a race condition leading to a use-after-free, related to net namespace cleanup".

Red Hat, Ubuntu, Debian and SUSE are all affected by the flaw, and security advisories have been issued for each Linux distro. It is worth noting that the "attack complexity" is rated as being "high", so while the impact of the security hole could be serious, the changes of a successful attack are relatively slim.

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Louis-Philippe Véronneau: Am I Fomu ?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

A few months ago at FOSDEM 2019 I got my hands on a pre-production version of the Fomu, a tiny open-hardware FPGA board that fits in your USB port. Building on the smash hit of the Tomu, the Fomu uses an ICE40UP5K FPGA instead of an ARM core.

I've never really been into hardware hacking, and much like hacking on the Linux kernel, messing with wires and soldering PCB boards always intimidated me. From my perspective, playing around with the Fomu looked like a nice way to test the water without drowning in it.

Since the bootloader wasn't written at the time, when I first got my Fomu hacker board there was no easy way to test if the board was working. Lucky for me, Giovanni Mascellani was around and flashed a test program on it using his Raspberry Pi and a bunch of hardware probes. I was really impressed by the feat, but it also seemed easy enough that I could do it.

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Also: ItsyBitsy Snek — snek on the Adafruit ItsyBitsy

Xfce 4.14 Coming Soon

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Xfce 4.14pre1 released!

    Note: A lot has happened since Xfce 4.12 was released four years ago and this announcement only covers the changes that were included in the latest development releases dubbed as Xfce 4.14pre1. Also, we have noticed some confusion by people or news outlets that seem to mistake xfdesktop for the “Xfce Desktop Environment”.

    The comprehensive changelog will be provided with the Xfce 4.14 final release, but here go some select highlights that were released in the last week (chosen subjectively by the author).

  • Xfce 4.14 Sees Its Long-Awaited Pre-Release

    The GTK3-ported Xfce 4.14 might see its long-awaited official release in the near future. In preparing for a hopeful August debut, the Xfce 4.14 pre-release is now available.

    It's been four years since the release of Xfce 4.12 and in addition to the GTK3 tool-kit re-tooling there has been a lot of UI improvements, vblank support added, colord integration, and many other feature additions.

Linux 5.2-rc1

Filed under
Linux

Nothing particularly odd going on this merge window. I had some travel
in the middle of it, but to offset that I had a new faster test-build
setup, and most of the pull requests came in early (thank you) so my
travels didn't actually end up affecting the merge window all that
much.

We did have a few late pull requests too, but since that meshed fairly
well with my schedule as per above, and people generally made the
proper noises ("sorry for late pull request, I had good reasons: xyz")
I didn't mind this time. But let's try to not repeat that, ok?

Things look fairly normal. Just about two thirds of the patch is
drivers (all over), with the bulk of the rest being arch updates,
tooling, documentation and vfs/filesystem updates, of which there were
more than usual (the unicode tables for ext4 case insensitivity do end
up being a big part of the "bulk" side).

But there's core networking, kernel and vm changes too - it's just
that the other areas tend to simply be much bulkier. Drivers etc tend
to just have a ton more lines to them, if only by virtue of there
being so many of them (although admittedly also sometimes because some
drivers tend to just be very verbose and have a lot of register
definitions etc).

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Also: Linux 5.2-rc1 Kernel Released With Case-Insensitive EXT4, New Intel HW & RTW88 WiFi

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More in Tux Machines

Events: Linux Plumbers, SUSE in Germany and LibreOffice Paris HackFest

  • Linux Plumbers Earlybird Registration Quota Reached, Regular Registration Opens 30 June
    A few days ago we added more capacity to the earlybird registration quota, but that too has now filled up, so your next opportunity to register for Plumbers will be Regular Registration on 30 June … or alternatively the call for presentations to the refereed track is still open and accepted talks will get a free pass.
  • Gartner IT Infrastructure, Operations and Cloud Strategies Conference Frankfurt 2019
    In a week’s time, team SUSE will be heading to Frankfurt, Germany for this year’s Gartner IT Infrastructure, Operations and Cloud Strategies Conference. Hundreds of attendees from all around Europe will be paying Kap Europa Congress Centre in Frankfurt a visit – to network, speak to exhibitors, pick up valuable nuggets of information from the Gartner analysts, attend sessions to learn more about the latest happenings in IT infrastructure and operations and enjoy all that the beautiful city of Frankfurt has to offer.
  • LibreOffice Paris HackFest
    The LibreOffice Paris HackFest 2019 will take place on the weekend of July 5th-6th, at le 137, which is at 137 Boulevard Magenta, Paris 10e, France. The event is sponsored by INNO3, hosting the hackfest in their building, and The Document Foundation, providing reimbursement for travels and accommodations. LibreOffice Paris HackFest will start on Friday at 10AM. During the day there will be an informal meeting of the French community, to discuss local activities, while developers and other volunteers will hack the LibreOffice code. The venue will be available until 2AM. On Saturday the venue will open at 10AM, to allow people to continue working, and share hackfest results. The event will officially end at 8PM, but on Sunday there will be a city tour.

Security: GNU/Linux in Space (After Windows Viruses), Fingerprint Pseudo-Security, Mainframe Security and Slackware Updates

  • Space: New cybercrime battlefield? [Ed: Space has already dumped Microsoft Windows and moved to GNU/Linux (Debian) for security reasons. The famous incident has just been mentioned here.]
    In the same vein, is it believable for a virus to infect a space station orbiting at a distance of over 330 km above the earth? It shocked astronauts on board to find their Windows XP-based laptops on the International Space Station (ISS) infected with a virus called W32.Gammima in 2008. Gammima.AG worm is a malware that gathers and transmits sensitive gaming data to an attacker. Investigations later revealed that unsuspecting Russian cosmonauts had inadvertently carried infected USB storage devices aboard the station spreading computer viruses to the connected computers. The damage by the malware to the computer systems of the ISS is unknown to date.
  • OnePlus 7 Pro Fingerprint Scanner Hacked By Classic Hacking Technique
    OnePlus has recently launched its much-awaited OnePlus 7 Pro which is considered as one of the best smartphones of 2019 by many. Packing the latest Snapdragon processor, triple camera setup, UFS 3.0 and a 30W Warp Charging, the smartphone is a complete package but how safe is it? Speaking of safety, a YouTuber has managed to hack the in-display fingerprint scanner of OnePlus 7 Pro within a few minutes. Going by the name Max Tech, this YouTuber deployed the classic print molding hacking technique to get past the fingerprint reader. If you have bought the smartphone or you’re a potential buyer then I must tell you that OnePlus 7 Pro is not the first device to be hacked by this technique.
  • Just how secure are mainframes?
    The days of mainframe security by obscurity are long gone. Everyone – especially hackers – knows that there are lots of valuable data sitting on mainframes. So, how aware are mainframe-using organizations about what it takes to secure all the components of a mainframe environment? Key Resources Inc has announced the findings from a new study conducted by Forrester Consulting carried out in February 2019. The survey questioned 225 IT management and security decision makers in North America.
  • [Slackware] April ?19 release of OpenJDK 8
    Early May I was confined to my bed, immobilized on my side and under medication, after I had incurred a second back hernia in four months’ time. And so I missed the announcement on the OpenJDK mailing list about the new icedtea-3.12.0. Why again is that important? Well, the IcedTea framework is a software harness to compile OpenJDK with ease. Andrew Hughes (aka GNU/Andrew) who is the release manager still did not update his blog with this announcment, but nevertheless:  the new Java8 that we will get is OpenJDK 8u212_b04. This release syncs the OpenJDK support in IcedTea to the official April 2019 security fixes for Java. I built Slackware packages for Java 8 Update 212 so that you do not have to succumb to the official Oracle binaries which are compiled on God-knows what OS.

today's howtos and programming

KDE: Krita Interview, KDE Developer Documentation and KDE Craft Packager

  • Krita Interview with Anna Hannon
    I opted for trying Linux Mint, and tested Krita as my Photoshop replacement. Love at first sight! I currently run Manjaro KDE and it continues to be my only painting software (even on my Microsoft surface).
  • KDE Developer Documentation Update: Far from the Endgame
    It has been nearly three months since I embarked on an adventure in the land known as dev docs. And while the set period for that work is coming to a close, the truth is that the journey has really only just begun. Just like the pioneers of old, the first important step is to get to survey the land and map it for future adventurers. The KDE community’s developer documentation isn’t exactly new territory but, through the years, it has grown from a garden to a huge forest with only a brave few doing the work to keep things from getting out of hand. They could use a helping hand.
  • KDE Craft Packager on macOS
    In Craft, to create a package, we can use craft --package after the compiling and the installing of a library or an application with given blueprint name. On macOS, MacDMGPackager is the packager used by Craft. The MacDylibBundleris used in MacDMGPackager to handle the dependencies. In this article, I’ll give a brief introduction of the two classes and the improvement which I’ve done for my GSoC project.