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Linux

Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • Linksys is making its first modem / router hybrid

    Linksys, a networking company that makes both routers and modems, is now releasing a router / modem hybrid device that combines the two into one. While these kinds of devices aren’t exactly new, it is Linksys’s first shot at making one [...]

  • Congatec proposes API and middleware spec for COMs

    Congatec has launched a “ComX” standard for computer-on-module API and middleware spanning COM Express, Qseven, and SMARC form-factors.

    At the Embedded Systems Expo & Conference (ESEC) in Japan this week (May 10-12), Congatec announced an “extended standardization initiative” called ComX. The proposed standard builds upon existing computer-on-module hardware standards such as COM Express, Qseven, and SMARC to standardize APIs and middleware, including its new Cloud API. The spec also includes some hardware standardization for COM integration with carrier boards.

  • OK Google: make this Nest hack a standard feature

    This easy (“at your own risk”) hack can unlock a Nest thermostat’s “Cool” mode in heater-only installations, allowing control of a heater’s ventilation fan as though it’s an A/C.

  • Clustering system supports up to 72 ARM modules

    Christmann’s “RECS|Box” evaluation platform and server enclosures can cluster up to 72 Toradex Apalis COMs, and offer GbE and KVM switching.

    Toradex announced that Christmann Informationstechnik + Medien GmbH & Co. KG has launched several RECS|Box cluster-computing platforms for Toradex’s ARM-based, Linux-friendly Apalis computer-on-modules. The systems work with any of Toradex’s SODIMM-style, pin-compatible Apalis-brand modules, including the i.MX6-based Apalis iMX6, Tegra K1 based Apalis TK1, and the soon-to-ship, i.MX8-based Apalis iMX8, among others.

Tips for picking a GNU/Linux Distribution

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GNU
Linux

Distrohopping is a term some like to use for switching from one GNU/Linux distribution to another frequently, rather than sticking to one system. I’m no stranger to this, I’ve installed nearly every major and popularly known system you’ll come across – twice.

However, through my time trying all of these various distributions, I’ve learned a great deal and finally settled (I think) upon where I plan to stay, so I thought I’d share some tips for picking your long-term system, as well as some ideas depending on what you enjoy.

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Release of NetworkManager 1.8

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME
  • NetworkManager 1.8 Released

    NetworkManager 1.8 is now available as the latest version of this widely-used network management component to Linux systems.

  • NetworkManager 1.8 Is Officially Out, Handles PINs for PKCS#11 Tokens as Secrets

    NetworkManager, the open-source network management tool used by default in numerous GNU/Linux distributions for allowing users to connection to various wired, wireless or mobile network connections, was updated to version 1.8.0.

    NetworkManager 1.8 is a major release that introduces numerous improvements and new features over the NetworkManager 1.6 series. Prominent ones include more flexible configurations for hostname management, as well as support for more route options like mtu, lock-mtu, initrwnd, lock-initrwnd, cwnd, lock-cwnd, tos, window, lock-window, pref-src, src, initcwnd, and lock-initcwnd.

WHY WINDOWS POWER USERS BREAK LINUX

Filed under
Linux

Finally, I think it’s worth pointing out that Linux is not a product, it’s a community. Windows and Mac people have a hard time wrapping their heads around that. They’re used to venting frustration at Microsoft and Apple. If they do that in a Linux forum, they will most likely get flamed. It’s important to understand that attacking Linux is like attacking the entire community. Is Linux perfect? Hell no! Is there much room for improvement? Absolutely! How you present your critiques and/or ask for help makes all the difference in the world. I have found that a positive and constructive attitude goes a long, long way. I have had developers bend over backward to help me with a problem or point me to an alternative solution just because I came to them with respect and didn’t point fingers.

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Linux 4.12, Linux 3.12.74, and Linux Foundation Nets SNAS.io

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Linux
  • Btrfs Gets RAID 5/6 Fixes With Linux 4.12

    There are a number of Btrfs fixes/clean-ups for the Linux 4.12 kernel.

    Btrfs on 4.12 doesn't have any big new features or major performance boosts, but it does notably have RAID5 and RAID6 fixes that are needed as outlined in that earlier article. So those wanting to run Btrfs on a RAID 5/6 array will definitely want to be using Linux 4.12+ once stable.

  • TEE Proposed For Merging In Linux 4.12: "Trusted" Execution Environment

    The ARM folks have requested that the TEE subsystem and OP-TEE drivers be included in Linux 4.12, the Trusted Execution Environment.

    The Trusted Execution Environment is is about communicating with a trusted OS running in a secure environment, separate from the Linux kernel itself. Of course, any time "trusted" computing is brought up in Linux/open-source there are a fair number of concerned individuals, especially in light of the recent major vulnerability in Intel AMT.

  • More Power Management Updates Head To The Linux 4.12 Kernel

    Last week was the main ACPI / power management updates for Linux 4.12 while Intel's Rafael Wysocki has now submitted a second set of feature updates for this next version of the Linux kernel.

  • IOMMU Updates, Optimizations For Linux 4.12

    There are a number of IOMMU optimizations queued for Linux 4.12.

    Joerg Roedel submitted the IOMMU kernel updates today for Linux 4.12. Among the changes for this important component to modern systems include code optimizations to the Intel VT-d driver, IOMMU core header optimizations, Samsung Exynos IOMMU optimizations, and ARM/SMMU optimizations.

  • Linux Kernel 3.12.74 Looks to Be the Last in the Series, Move to a Newer Branch

    Linux kernel developer and maintainer Jiri Slaby announced today the release and immediate availability of what it would appear to be the last maintenance update to the Linux 3.12 kernel series.

    Linux kernel 3.12.74 is out and it looks to be the last in the series, according to its maintainer, who urges all those using the Linux 3.12 kernel branch on their GNU/Linux distributions to start considering moving to a newer LTS (Long Term Support) Linux kernel, such as Linux 3.16, Linux 4.1, Linux 4.4, or Linux4.9.

    However, if you choose to remain on this branch at least update to Linux kernel 3.12.74, which changes a total of 78 files, with 834 insertions and 524 deletions, according to the appended shortlog. Improvements are all over the places, for various architectures, drivers, filesystems, security, and the networking stack.

  • Linux 3.12.74
  • SNAS.io, Formerly OpenBMP Project, Joins The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Networking Umbrella

    We are excited to announce that SNAS.io, a project that provides network routing topologies for software-defined applications, is joining The Linux Foundation’s Networking and Orchestration umbrella. SNAS.io tackles the challenging problem of tracking and analyzing network routing topology data in real time for those who are using BGP as a control protocol, internet service providers, large enterprises, and enterprise data center networks using EVPN.

Solus Receives Better Bluetooth A2DP Audio and Scanning Support, Other Goodies

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Solus Project's Joshua Strobl is reporting today in a new installation of the This Week In Solus (TWiS) newsletter on the latest work done by him and project leader Ikey Doherty for their beloved and very popular Solus operating system.

Last week - like many others before it - was extremely busy for the development team behind Solus, an independently-developed GNU/Linux distribution. The team finally managed to migrate the project's Git repositories and patch management system to the Diffusion and Differential apps of their Phabricator dev tracker tool.

This move has many implications for the ever-growing community and package maintainers, and you can read all about it in This Week In Solus Install #44, which brings many other good news for the regular Solus user as scanning and Bluetooth A2DP audio support has been greatly improved thanks to donators and patrons.

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Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi Fans Can Build Their Own AI Voice Assistant

    Google and AIY Projects last week launched an open source do-it-yourself artificial intelligence Voice Kit for Raspberry Pi hobbyists.

    The AIY Voice Kit includes hardware for audio capture and playback, connectors for the dual mike daughterboard and speaker, GPIO pins to connect low-voltage components such as micro servos and sensors, and an optional barrel connector for a dedicated power supply.

    The Voice Kit can use cloud services such as the recently released Google Assistant SDK, which is enabled by default, or it can use the Cloud Speech API or run completely on-device.

  • Raspberry Digital Signage 9.0 Supports Raspberry Pi Zero W, Based on Chromium 56

    After informing us last month about the release of Raspberry WebKiosk 6.0 for Raspberry Pi single-board computers, Binary Emotions is informing us today about the availability of Raspberry Digital Signage 9.0.

  • Portwell’s four new RS4U industrial PCs use a common API stack

    Portwell’s “RS4U” industrial computers feature a standard set of Portwell APIs. The first four models support Intel Apollo Lake, Skylake, and Haswell CPUs.

  • Rugged PC/104 SBC sandwich runs on Kaby Lake

    VersaLogic’s Linux-ready, sandwich-style “Liger” offers 7th Gen Core CPUs, ruggedization features, and mini-PCIe, SPI/SPX, and PC/104-Plus expansion.

OpenWRT and LEDE agree on LInux-for-routers peace plan

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Linux

Competing Linux-for-routers distributions OpenWRT and LEDE will soon vote on a proposal to heal the schism between the two.

OpenWRT is often used as firmware for small routers, largely SOHO WiFi kit. But in March 2016 a group of developers decided they didn't like the directions OpenWRT was taking and forked the project by creating the Linux Embedded Development Environment – LEDE – project. LEDE developers said they wanted to create a distribution that was more transparent and democratic than OpenWRT, followed a more predictable release schedule and produced stable code.

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NVIDIA in Linux 4.12, Nvidia 381.22 Video Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • NVIDIA Tegra186/Parker/TX2 Support For Linux 4.12

    Olof Johansson has sent in his large set of pull requests for the ARM SoC/platform updates slated for the in-development Linux 4.12 kernel.

  • NVIDIA 381.22 Linux Driver Released With Updated Vulkan

    NVIDIA has released a new short-lived Linux binary driver update that jumps it ahead to the 381 release series.

    Available today is the NVIDIA 381.22 Linux driver as the newest GeForce/Quadro/Tesla proprietary Linux graphics driver. This first 381 Linux driver update mostly consists of bug-fixes but also has new Vulkan extensions that previously were just part of their "Vulkan beta" driver.

  • Nvidia 381.22 Video Driver Supports Newer Linux Kernels, More Vulkan Extensions

    Nvidia released today a new short-lived graphics driver for GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris operating systems on all supported architectures, bringing various bug fixes, better Vulkan support, and some other improvements.

    Probably the most fundamental change of the Nvidia 381.22 graphics driver is support for a bunch of new Vulkan extensions, thus adding an extra layer of support for Vulkan, which in these days is more and more used in popular games. However, this was only implemented for the Linux driver.

  • NVIDIA 381.22 driver released with lots of bug fixes and newer Vulkan support

    NVIDIA have released their 381.22 driver which comes with plenty of fixes, newer Vulkan support and more.

Tizen, Fuchsia, and Android

Filed under
OS
Android
Linux
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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers: WCry/Ransomwar, WannaCry, Athena

OSS Leftovers

  • Nextcloud 12 Officially Released, Adds New Architecture for Massive Scalability
    Nextcloud informs Softpedia today about the official availability of the final release of Nextcloud 12, a major milestone of the self-hosting cloud server technology that introduces numerous new features and improvements. The biggest new feature of the Nextcloud 12 release appears to be the introduction of a new architecture for massive scalability, called Global Scale, which is a next-generation open-source technology for syncing and sharing files. Global Scale increases scalability from tens of thousands of users to hundreds of millions on a single instance, while helping universities and other institutions significantly reduce the costs of their existing large installations.
  • ReactOS 0.4.5 Open-Source Windows-Compatible OS Launches with Many Improvements
    ReactOS 0.4.5 is a maintenance update that adds numerous changes and improvements over the previous point release. The kernel has been updated in this version to improve the FreeLoader and UEFI booting, as well as the Plug and Play modules, adding support for more computers to boot ReactOS without issues.
  • Sprint Debuts Open Source NFV/SDN Platform Developed with Intel Labs
    AT&T has been the headliner in the carrier race to software defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV). But Sprint is putting its own stamp on the space this week with its debut of a new open source SDN/NFV mobile core solution.
  • Google’s New Home for All Things Open Source Runs Deep
    Google is not only one of the biggest contributors to the open source community but also has a strong track record of delivering open source tools and platforms that give birth to robust technology ecosystems. Just witness the momentum that Android and Kubernetes now have. Recently, Google launched a new home for its open source projects, processes, and initiatives. The site runs deep and has several avenues worth investigating. Here is a tour and some highlights worth noting.
  • Making your first open source contribution
  • Simplify expense reports with Smart Receipts
    The app is called Smart Receipts, it's licensed AGPL 3.0, and the source code is available on GitHub for Android and iOS.
  • How the TensorFlow team handles open source support
    Open-sourcing is more than throwing code over the wall and hoping somebody uses it. I knew this in theory, but being part of the TensorFlow team at Google has opened my eyes to how many different elements you need to build a community around a piece of software.
  • IRC for the 21st Century: Introducing Riot
    Internet relay chat (IRC) is one of the oldest chat protocols around and still popular in many open source communities. IRC's best strengths are as a decentralized and open communication method, making it easy for anyone to participate by running a network of their own. There are also a variety of clients and bots available for IRC.

Tizen News: Phones and TVs

  • Tizen 3.0-powered Samsung Z4 now available with offline retailers in india
    The Samsung Z4, the fourth smartphone in Samsung’s Z series and a successor to the Z2 (and not the Z3, as many would assume), has been formally announced and made an appearance at the Tizen Developer Conference (TDC 2017) this past week. The Z4 was rumoured to make its way to India on May 19th (Friday) and it did – arriving with offline retailers after launching in the country last Monday (one week ago).
  • Samsung 2017 QLED TVs World First to support autocalibration for HDR
  • Samsung approves You.i TV video platform for Tizen TV app development
    While Samsung has developed Tizen TV apps using JavaScript, You.i TV’s Engine Video app runs on Native Client (NACL), a web technology that does not only allows C++ applications to run in a standard browser but is said to be 24 times faster than JavaScript. Now that Samsung has approved You.i TV’s video engine platform, developers can craft more video content for Tizen Smart TV owners.
  • Samsung Smart TV gets a new Glympse app that enables location sharing on the TV
    Samsung Smart TV, powered by the intuitive, self-developed Tizen operating system, has gotten a cool new app which enables consumers to view the location of their friends, loved ones or even a pizza delivery or cable technician in real-time directly from their home’s largest screen. The new app is developed by Glympse, the leading real-time location services platform.

How To Encrypt DNS Traffic In Linux Using DNSCrypt

​Dnscrypt is a protocol that is used to improve DNS security by authenticating communications between a DNS client and a DNS resolver. DNSCrypt prevents DNS spoofing. It uses cryptographic signatures to verify that responses originate from the chosen DNS resolver and haven’t been tampered with. DNSCrypt is available for multi-platforms including Windows, MacOS, Unix, Android, iOS, Linux and even routers. Read
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