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Linux 4.17 RC 1

Filed under
Linux
  • Kernel prepatch 4.17-rc1

    Linus has released 4.17-rc1 and closed the merge window for this release.

  • Linux 4.17-rc1
  • Linux 4.17-rc1

    So two weeks have passed, and the merge window was pretty normal and
    is now closed.

    This does not seem to be shaping up to be a particularly big release,
    and there seems to be nothing particularly special about it. The most
    special thing that happened is purely numerology: we've passed the six
    million git objects mark, and that is reason enough to call the next
    kernel 5.0. Except I probably won't, because I don't want to be too
    predictable. The version numbers are meaningless, which should mean
    that they don't even follow silly numerological rules - even if v3.0
    and v4.0 happened to be at the 2M and 4M mark respectively.

    But v5.0 will happen some day. And it should be meaningless. You have
    been warned.

    Anyway, we do have a *few* other things that happened, like Arnd
    getting rid of a number of architectures that seem to simply not
    matter any more. If it turns out that somebody wants to resurrect any
    of them, the code is all there in the git history, but you'll have to
    do the work and show that you'll maintain it and have a few users.

    And just to not make it *all* about removing old architectures,
    there's a new one in there too.

    The architectures that are gone are blackfin, cris, frv, m32r, metag,
    mn10300, score, and tile. And the new architecture is the nds32
    (Andes Technology 32-0bit RISC architecture).

    We actually have a fair amount of other removal and cleanups too. I
    was somewhat pleasantly surprised by the number of pull requests that
    actually ended up removing a lot of lines. Some of it was staging
    drivers that finally gave up the ghost (like irda), but we also got
    rid of some copyright language boiler-plate in favor of just the spdx
    lines. And some pre-shipped lexer/parser files are no more, we're
    better off just generating them.

    End result: we actually removed more lines than we added:

    13538 files changed, 627723 insertions(+), 818855 deletions(-)

    which is probably a first. Ever. In the history of the universe. Or at
    least kernel releases.

    I'd call it momentous, but I think the arch removal was most of it,
    and I'm sure people will quickly rectify that momentary glitch of
    actually shrinking the kernel source code.

    Go out and test,

    Linus

  • Linux 4.17-rc1 Kernel Released: A Ton Of New Functionality While Shedding Old Code

    Just like clockwork the Linux 4.17-rc1 kernel was released tonight following the two week long merge window.

    See the Linux 4.17 features article published this morning to learn all about what's new in this kernel release. There is a ton of work from prominent AMD and Intel graphics driver updates to new hardware support and much more. As covered just a short time ago, Linux 4.17 power measurements are looking surprisingly good for lowering the power use while idling and also the power efficiency under load.

    More Linux 4.17 kernel benchmarks are on the way.

  • Linux 4.17 Offers Some Promising Power-Savings Improvements

    Of the many improvements to be found in the in-development Linux 4.17 kernel -- nicely summarized in our Linux 4.17 feature overview -- one of the features I've been anxious the most to begin benchmarking has been the reported power management improvements. Here are my initial power/performance tests of Linux 4.17 that for some systems is seeing a measurable drop in power usage, even in some cases under load while without sacrificing the performance.

  • The Many Great Features & Changes Coming For The Linux 4.17 Kernel

    Linus Torvalds is expected by the end of the day to release Linux 4.17-rc1, thereby marking the end of the two-week merge window that saw a lot of changes and new features land for Linux 4.17. Here is our original feature overview of the changes to be found in this next major release of the Linux kernel, which should premiere as stable by the middle of June.

    While many of you have likely not even upgraded yet to the feature-packed Linux 4.16, there is a lot more coming to look forward to with the Linux 4.17 kernel this summer. There are many Intel/AMD graphics driver improvements, support for obsolete CPU architectures being dropped, some new CPU support added including initial bits for the NVIDIA Xavier SoC, a potentially very big improvement for dropping Linux idle power usage, various file-system improvements, new hardware support, and even improvements for the Macintosh PowerBook 100 series from more than 20 years ago.

Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.60 Mate Edition released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Today we are very happy to announce the release of Black Lab Enterprise Linux Mate released. Our Mate desktop is based on Ubuntu MATE 16.04.3 with a lot of other enhancements and fixes.. Black Lab Mate is available for download today and you can get it from our ibiblio download servers.

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LibreELEC (Krypton) 8.2.5 MR

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

LibreELEC (Krypton) 8.2.5 is now available with updates to Raspberry Pi firmware to address issues seen with the initial firmware release supporting the new 3B+ hardware (which also affected the Slice box). We also bump both nVidia drivers in the Generic x86_64 image, resolve an MCE remote problem, add support for the WeTek Pro remote control unit in WeTek images, the Allo DigiOne DAC in Raspberry Pi images, and updated u-boot in the Odroid C2 image now supports mild overclocking to boost performance.

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Release of Linux 4.9.94, 4.4.128, and 3.18.105; Linux 4.17-rc1 Coming Soon

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Linux

OpenAFS 1.8 Released, Drops Pre-2.6 Linux Support

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Linux

It's been a number of years since the last major update to the OpenAFS Andrew distributed file-system but there's a Friday the 13th release today introducing the shiny new v1.8 release.

OpenAFS continues to support all major operating systems from Windows to BSDs to Linux and macOS, but the OpenAFS 1.8 release does finally drop support for pre-2.6 Linux kernels. OpenAFS 1.8 also brings RPM packaging improvements.

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Oracle's Kernel (Linux)

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Linux
  • Development Versions of Oracle Linux UEK now available on GitHub

    The source for UEK has always been available at oss.oracle.com, as a git repository with full git history. Starting now, we'll also be posting the UEK source on github.com/oracle/linux-uek. By doing so, we intend to increase the visibility for our work and to make it even easier for people to access the source for UEK. We will also use this repository for working with developers at partner companies and in the Linux community. The repository contains the source for the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel including a small number of Oracle additions which have not yet been accepted into the mainline Linux kernel source tree.

  • Oracle Offers Its Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel On GitHub

    While the source to Oracle's "Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel" has been available via the company's own servers, now the organization is publishing their source kernel changes to GitHub in a bid to increase the popularity of their patched version of Linux.

    Oracle's Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel remains focused on performance and stability while going along with their RHEL-derived Oracle Linux distribution. They hope now posting their source changes to GitHub will increase the visibility of the UEK and in turn users.

System 76 in Development and in Local News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • System76's Pop!_OS Is Exploring Intel's Clear Linux Performance/Power Optimizations

    When Ubuntu-loaded laptop and desktop vendor System76 announced their new Ubuntu downstream last year as "Pop!_OS" it began as mostly cosmetic changes to the desktop shell and other minor improvements. Over time they've been investing more into it with work items like a better installation process, but it looks like they will be diving deeper as they begin exploring performance and power optimizations.

  • Denver computer maker moves manufacturing back to Colorado from China, but not because of tariffs

    System 76, a Denver-based maker of personal computers, is bringing its manufacturing here from China — a decision that has nothing to do with import tariffs, corporate taxes or political pressure to return jobs to America.

    [...]

    But System 76, which sells Linux Ubuntu machines, began thinking about moving manufacturing to the U.S. two years ago because of frustrations such as a small design change taking four months to implement instead of what is now expected to be a few days. It took a year to find industrial space — a 23,000-square-foot facility near Interstate 70 and Peoria Street. And the first computer off the Denver line will be within six months.

DRM Drivers Get Fixes Ahead Of Linux 4.17-rc1

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Following the big DRM pull request that was honored last week, David Airlie decided to send in a pre-RC1 pull request of various outstanding bug fixes against these Direct Rendering Manager drivers.

While normally it's after RC1 when the bug fixes for DRM begin flowing in, a lot had already been accumulated and so their first "fixes" pull of the DRM drivers for 4.17 has now been sent over to Linus Torvalds. A lot of the fixes affect the AMDGPU DRM driver. The AMDGPU fixes include addressing the new Vega 12 support, an HDMI audio regression, DC display code fixes now that it's enabled on all supported GPUs, and various other fixes.

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Also: TRIM Support Is Closer To Being Merged For ZFS On Linux

Redcore Linux Makes Gentoo Easy

Filed under
Linux
Gentoo

Raise your hand if you’ve always wanted to try Gentoo Linux but never did because you didn’t have either the time or the skills to invest in such a challenging installation. I’m sure there are plenty of Linux users out there not willing to admit this, but it’s okay, really; installing Gentoo is a challenge, and it can be very time consuming. In the end, however, installing Gentoo will result in a very personalized Linux desktop that offers the fulfillment of saying, “I did it!”

So, what’s a curious Linux user to do, when they want to experience this elite distribution? One option is to turn to the likes of Redcore Linux. Redcore does what many have tried (and few have succeeded in doing) in bringing Gentoo to the masses. In fact, Sabayon Linux is the only other distro I can think of that’s truly succeeded in bringing a level of simplicity to Gentoo Linux that many users can enjoy. And while Sabayon is still very much in active development, it’s good to know there are others attempting what might have once been deemed impossible.

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Security things in Linux v4.16 and LF News

Filed under
Linux
  • security things in Linux v4.16

    Will Deacon, Catalin Marinas, and several other folks brought Kernel Page Table Isolation (via CONFIG_UNMAP_KERNEL_AT_EL0) to arm64. While most ARMv8+ CPUs were not vulnerable to the primary Meltdown flaw, the Cortex-A75 does need KPTI to be safe from memory content leaks. It’s worth noting, though, that KPTI does protect other ARMv8+ CPU models from having privileged register contents exposed. So, whatever your threat model, it’s very nice to have this clean isolation between kernel and userspace page tables for all ARMv8+ CPUs.

  • LC3 Schedule Announced, Register Now | LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen 中国论坛日程表现已公布,立即注册 [Ed:  LF once again gave KEYNOTE spot to Microsoft: "Senior Software Engineer, Microsoft" ... Because Zemlin whose job was to pay Torvalds now earns more than Torvalds (who actually does the work) and wants to keep Microsoft’s money flowing...]
  • iconectiv Joins Linux Foundation’s Open Source Networking Collaboration Project, Including Transition to NFV

    iconectiv, an authoritative partner of the global communications industry connecting more than two billion people every day, today announced the company has joined The LF Networking Fund (LFN), a new open source networking initiative created by The Linux Foundation. The focus of LFN is to increase collaboration and operational excellence across networking projects, including Open Platform for NFV (OPNFV), to help deliver a new generation of services.

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Collaboration Events: Pakistan Open Source Summit, GNOME+Rust Hackfest, DataworksSummit Berlin

  • Pakistan Open Source Summit 2018 concludes [Ed: Not about software]
    A large number of attendees from industry, academia, government, and students participated in the summit. Portuguese Ambassador to Pakistan Dr Joao Sabido Costa was the chief guest at the opening ceremony while former Naval Chief Admiral (r) Asif Sandila graced the occasion as the chief guest at the closing ceremony.
  • ‘Open Summit key to create industry-academy linkages’
    Ambassador of Portugal to Pakistan Dr Joao Sabido Costa has said that events such as the Open Source Summit are excellent for spreading awareness and for creating industry-academia linkages and enhancement of the information technology. He stated this while addressing a concluding ceremony of the two-day informative ‘Pakistan Open Source Summit 2018’ attended by large number of people from industry, academia, government and students. Former naval chief Admiral (R) Asif Sandila co-chaired the concluding session. Dr Joao Sabido Costa said that the organisations should utilise open source platforms to build their IT infrastructures in future. To build open source culture in Pakistan, he recommended roadmap with future activities and timelines for spreading open source.
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 2
    Yesterday we went to the Madrid Rust Meetup, a regular meeting of rustaceans here. Martin talked about WebRender; I talked about refactoring C to port it to Rust, and then Alex talked about Rust's plans for 2018. Fun times.
  • DataworksSummit Berlin - Wednesday morning
    Data strategy - cloud strategy - business strategy: Aligning the three was one of the main themes (initially put forward in his opening keynote by CTO of Hortonworks Scott Gnau) thoughout this weeks Dataworks Summit Berlin kindly organised and hosted by Hortonworks. The event was attended by over 1000 attendees joining from 51 countries. The inspiration hat was put forward in the first keynote by Scott was to take a closer look at the data lifecycle - including the fact that a lot of data is being created (and made available) outside the control of those using it: Smart farming users are using a combination of weather data, information on soil conditions gathered through sensors out in the field in order to inform daily decisions. Manufacturing is moving towards closer monitoring of production lines to spot inefficiencies. Cities are starting to deploy systems that allow for better integration of public services. UX is being optimized through extensive automation.

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today's howtos

10 Great Linux GTK Themes For 2018

Customization is a big part of the Linux experience, and your desktop theme is no exception. The world of Linux desktop themes is an ever-evolving one, with new ones replacing old favorites all the time. Of course, the desktop environments and GTK itself are always changing, so that adds another dynamic element to consider. That said, some of the best desktop customization happens on the simplest desktop environments, like XFCE. As of now, in early 2018, there are some really excellent GTK themes available. These themes aren’t ranked in any particular order. That comes down to a matter or preference. Any one of them can add a whole new look to your GTK-based desktop. Read more