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Best Windows Like Linux Distributions For New Linux Users

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Hey new Linux users, you may be wondering that which Linux distro to choose after seeing so many distros based on Linux. Most of you might be switching from windows to Linux and want those distros which are easy and simple, resemble like windows. So today I will cover those Linux distros whose Desktop Environment is much similar to windows, so let’s start.

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What Is NVM (Non-Volatile Memory)?

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Linux

So Photoshop is the industry standard for photo editing but it is going to cost you as high as $600 a year. If you are looking for something arguably as good but cheaper as free, then you’ve got to go with GIMP. GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP) is a cross-platform image editor available for GNU/Linux, OS X, Windows and more operating systems. So how good is GIMP? Can it effectively replace Photoshop? How far Let’s take a look.

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Desktop GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Munich's great Linux desktop initiative may end [Ed: Misleading summary - if not altogether factually incorrect - from Microsoft Peter and now Andy Patrizio. Is Microsoft giving them marching orders? Longtime Microsoft propagandist Patrizio helps his bosses with Munich FUD.]
  • Munich May Ditch Linux Desktops For Windows [Ed: "End of an era," it says. No. It's not. It hasn't even been decided yet. Old tactics again...]
  • Chromium OS – Exton Build 170212 – with YouTube and Spotify working fast and responsive

    The difference between Chromium OS and Google Chrome OS
    Chromium OS is the open source project, used primarily by developers, with code that is available for anyone to checkout, modify, and build. Google Chrome OS is the Google product that OEMs ship on Chromebooks for general consumer use.

  • Should you run Linux without a desktop environment?

    One of the best things about Linux is that there is a wide variety of desktop environments available to choose from for your computer. But not everybody uses a desktop environment like GNOME, Unity, etc. Some folks prefer to skip them entirely, for various reasons.

    A redditor recently asked about Linux users who skip desktop environments, and he got some interesting answers.

  • Ukuu Makes it Easy to Install Mainline Kernel on Ubuntu

    Ever wondered how to install new kernel releases on Ubuntu? Using Ukuu (which stands for ‘Ubuntu Kernel Update Utility’) is one way to do it. This straightforward desktop app help you install a new kernel in Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and other Ubuntu-based distributions, using the “mainline” kernels published by Canonical.

4 categories of Linux distributions

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Linux

There are different Linux distributions. If you just go to Distrowatch site, you will find hundreds of them listed there. Some of them even have my reviews listed. And how many distributions are NOT listed? Some of them either fail to gain registration on Distrowatch, or are in the process of that, like Zorin OS was just few years ago.

However, there are at least four distinctive categories of distributions visible in the Linux world.

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Linux 4.9.10

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Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.9.10 kernel.

All users of the 4.9 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.9.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.9.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

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Also: Linux Kernel 4.9.10 Has ARM, x86 and PowerPC Improvements, Updated Drivers

Linux 4.4.49

Linux Kernel 4.4.49 LTS Is a Small Patch with Some ARM Fixes and Updated Drivers

7 features Linux could borrow from other systems

Filed under
Linux

Linux (or, GNU/Linux, if you prefer) distributions are absolutely amazing—stable, fast, flexible. Your average Linux-based system is a veritable powerhouse of functionality—a tour de force of what computers can accomplish. But from time to time, other operating systems have some pretty great ideas. Here are seven of my personal favorites that Linux distributions might want to consider “borrowing.” Hint, hint. Nudge, nudge.

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Hands-On: Raspberry Pi 7-inch Touch Display and case

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Linux

While writing about Kali Linux on the Raspberry Pi recently, I started thinking about portability with the Raspberry Pi. Until now, I have used a standard HDMI desktop monitor (24", 1920x1080), which doesn't exactly lend itself to portability. So I started looking for a small, portable display and a convenient case.

The first thing I realized was that there are a lot of different displays available for the Raspberry Pi. I mean really a lot -- so many that it can be pretty intimidating just trying to figure out what the differences, advantages, and disadvantages are.

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A musician's transition from distro to distro

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I got news about Ubuntu Studio in 2007, and moved to it. As a musician and sound technician, I had used a digital Portastudio to record and mix because I enjoyed turning actual knobs when mixing. I used Ubuntu Studio for mastering in Audacity before I had the chance to upgrade all my studio equipment with a new laptop and sound card in 2010. I did a lot of research to get the best USB sound card and compatible laptop for recording. I was quite sad when I realized that even though it looked good on paper, everything didn't quite work well in reality. I could only get the card work on 16 bit in Linux, but in Windows it would record with 24 bit and 96 KHz. I felt frustrated, I was back to a dual boot life.

Then Ubuntu Studio 12.10 was released and my sound card and laptop finally played nicely together. What a joy! However, much had changed in my life with family and work, and I wouldn't be doing much recording at home for quite some time. Instead I found out I could contribute to open source without being a programmer, which had never occurred to me before. Because I had so much joy and benefit from open source I wanted to give something back. I had participated in the Ubuntu Forums for a while and reached out to the Ubuntu Studio team.

For a few years, I would contribute when I could with the little time I had available between family, work, sleep, and all the other things I wanted to dabble within the 24 hours available each day.

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Also: Organizing your music: Tagging as you rip

Samsung’s latest Artik module offers quad A9 SoC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Samsung has launched a new, Fedora Linux ready Artik 530 COM and development kit, which unlike the dual -Cortex-A7 Artik 520, moves to a quad-core -A9 SoC.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux and Graphics

  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Now Available for Linux Lite Users, Here's How to Install It
    Minutes after the release of Linux kernel 4.10 last evening, Jerry Bezencon from the Linux Lite project announced that users of the Ubuntu-based distribution can now install it on their machines. Linux 4.10 is now the most advanced kernel branch for all Linux-based operating systems, and brings many exciting new features like virtual GPU support, better writeback management, eBPF hooks for cgroups, as well as Intel Cache Allocation Technology support for the L2/L3 caches of Intel processors.
  • Wacom's Intuos Pro To Be Supported By The Linux 4.11 Kernel
    Jiri Kosina submitted the HID updates today for the Linux 4.11 kernel cycle.
  • Mesa 13.0.5 Released for Linux Gamers with over 70 Improvements, Bug Fixes
    We reported the other day that Mesa 13.0.5 3D Graphics Library will be released this week, and it looks like Collabora's Emil Velikov announced it earlier this morning for all Linux gamers. Mesa 13.0.5 is a maintenance update to the Mesa 13.0 stable series of the open source graphics stack used by default in numerous, if not all GNU/Linux distributions, providing gamers with powerful drivers for their AMD Radeon, Nvidia, and Intel GPUs. It comes approximately three weeks after the Mesa 13.0.4 update.
  • mesa 13.0.5

Interview: Thomas Weissel Installing Plasma in Austrian Schools

With Plasma 5 having reached maturity for widespread use we are starting to see rollouts of it in large environments. Dot News interviewed the admin behind one such rollout in Austrian schools. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Top Lightweight Linux Distributions To Try In 2017
    Today I am going to discuss the top lightweight Linux distros you can try this year on your computer. Although you got yourself a prettyLinuxle linux already but there is always something new to try in Linux. Remember I recommend to try this distros in virtualbox firstly or with the live boot before messing with your system. All distro that I will mention here will be new and somewhat differ from regular distros.
  • [ANNOUNCE] linux-4.10-ck1 / MuQSS CPU scheduler 0.152
  • MSAA Compression Support For Intel's ANV Vulkan Driver
    Intel developer Jason Ekstrand posted a patch over the weekend for enabling MSAA compression support within the ANV Vulkan driver.
  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 31
    As we announced in the previous report, our 31th Scrum sprint was slightly shorter than the usual ones. But you would never say so looking to this blog post. We have a lot of things to talk you about!
  • Comparing Mobile Subscriber Data Across Different Sources - How accurate is the TomiAhonen Almanac every year?
    You’ll see that last spring I felt the world had 7.6 Billion total mobile subscriptions when machine-to-machine (M2M) connections are included. I felt the world had 7.2 Billion total subscriptions when excluding M2M and just counting those in use by humans. And the most relevant number (bottom line) is the ‘unique’ mobile users, which I felt was an even 5.0 Billion humans in 2015. The chart also has the total handsets-in-use statistic which I felt was 5.6 Billion at the end of 2015. Note that I was literally the first person to report on the distinction of the unique user count vs total subscriptions and I have been urging, nearly begging for the big industry giants to also measure that number. They are slowly joining in that count. Similarly to M2M, we also are now starting to see others report M2M counts. I have yet to see a major mobile statistical provider give a global count of devices in use. That will hopefully come also, soon. But lets examine these three numbers that we now do have other sources, a year later, to see did I know what I was doing.

Leftovers: Gaming