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elementary OS 0.3.2 "Freya" review

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The most recent version of elementary OS, codenamed Freya, was released in December 2015 and is based on Ubuntu's 14.04 Long Term Support distribution. I downloaded the distro's ISO from their website, for a paltry fee of $0.00, and loaded it onto a USB using Unetbootin. After the quick Unetbootin boot-up screen, I found a familiar install process. elementary's installation process is beautiful, simple, and works. This is because the installation software, much like everything else in this distro, is based off of Ubuntu. Using the Ubuntu installer is very easy, but elementary turns it into an exercise in beauty as well. The install was quick, taking only about ten minutes to complete.

The first thing I noticed about elementary was the dock. The dock is located at the bottom of the screen and includes the applications that the elementary team thinks you will use most. Initially included on the dock are applications for music, pictures, videos, mail, the calendar, the web browser, and the settings panel.

The desktop environment on elementary is called Pantheon. Pantheon includes the dock at the bottom and the panel at the top. The panel at the top is a picture of sheer beauty, and I mean sheer. Where previously the panel was a solid bar at the top of the screen with text in it, it is now completely transparent. This gives the effect that the words are part of the screen. The panel includes the applications on the left, a clock in the middle, and the indicators on the right to show wi-fi, alerts, and battery life, among other things. Pantheon was overall a big hit for me, and I would love to see this desktop environment get ported over into other big distros. Unfortunately, Pantheon crashed many times during my use. Each time it automatically restarted and prompted me to send a bug report; I am disappointed by this instability.

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GTK3 Support in Firefox 46.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Moz/FF
GNOME
  • Firefox 46.0 Is Ready To Ship, GTK3 Support Appears Finally Baked

    Firefox 46 won't be formally announced until the morning, but in usual fashion the source and various platform binaries have appeared this evening.

  • Mozilla Firefox 46.0 Now Available for Download with GTK3 Integration for Linux

    Just a few moments ago, we discovered that Mozilla has uploaded the final version of the Firefox 46.0 web browser to its FTP servers, making them available for download for all supported platforms.

    The Firefox 46.0 web browser is expected to be officially unveiled by Mozilla later today, April 26, 2016, finally bringing the GTK3 integration for the GNU/Linux platform, along with improved security of the JavaScript JIT (Just In Time) compiler and support for using the Content Decryption Module (CDM) as a fallback for decoding unencrypted H.264 and AAC streams.

Linux and FOSS in Kerala

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Why shun Linux, CM Oommen Chandy asks V S Achuthandnan

    Chief Minister Oommen Chandy has slammed opposition leader V S Achuthandnan for preaching free software on the one hand and using a product of Microsoft for his own website. The Chief Minister said though Achuthanandan had repeatedly accused Microsoft of being a global monopolist, his website has been developed using asp.net , which is a product of Microsoft.

  • Microsoft caught in Kerala's political battle

    Continuing his attack on V S Achutanandan, Kerala Chief Minister Oommen Chandy today slammed the Marxist veteran for using a product of Microsoft, which he had earlier dubbed as a "global monopoly giant", to develop his website ahead of the May 16 assembly polls.

  • In Kerala, Chandy, Achuthanandan spar over usage of software

    Chandy has asked Achuthanandan to explain why he opted for Microsoft when it came to setting up his own website and Facebook page while he has been battling for free software (open source) all these years.

Kernel Space/Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Checkpoint-Restore Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference

    This year will feature a four-fold deeper dive into checkpoint-restore technology, thanks to participation by people from a number of additional related projects! These are the OpenMPI message-passing library, Berkeley Lab Checkpoint/Restart (BLCR), and Distributed MultiThreaded CheckPointing (DMTCP) (not to be confused with TCP/IP), in addition to the Checkpoint/Restore in Userspace group that has participated in prior years.

  • Setting Up The Radeon Open Compute Platform On Linux

    Posted today to the GPUOpen blog was a guide on setting up the Radeon Open Compute Platform (ROCm) support. The RoCm 1.0 platform consists of the ROCK kernel driver, ROCR runtime, ROCT Thunk Interface, HCC compiler, LLVM-AMDGPU-Assembler-Extra, and LLVM/Clang. AMD/RTG offers the Radeon Open Compute Platform packages for Ubuntu/Debian systems as well as Fedora/RedHat distributions.

  • Many EFI Updates Prepped For Linux 4.7 Kernel

    Matt Fleming at Intel sent out the set of patches he intends to submit as the queue of EFI changes for what will become the Linux 4.7 kernel. He noted of this queue, "this is probably the biggest EFI pull ever sent, and there quite a few different topics covered."

My Linux Desktop — Hither and Yawn

Filed under
GNU
Linux

An argument has taken the form of a verbal running gun battle at our shop, depending on who’s working that day. Does training a student in the use of Linux deprive them of valuable, life-long learning opportunities? I mean, it’s hard to argue the value of being able to delve into the registry and edit the offending subkeys and values that are allowing your banking information to be spread across three continents. How are they to learn the ins and outs of virus and malware protection and for Pete’s sake, do it for the children. Make sure they learn how to use Malwarebytes. For the love of Linux, please don’t fail these kids.

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Chromium OS for Raspberry Pi 3 Officially Released, PINE64 Port Coming Soon

Filed under
OS
Linux

Chromium OS for SBC project, through Dylan Callahan, informs Softpedia about the immediate availability for download of the Chromium OS for Raspberry Pi 3 single-board computers.

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Roundup of community backed x86 hacker SBCs

Filed under
Android
Linux

The first community supported x86 hacker SBCs not backed by Intel or AMD are pricier than most ARM SBCs, but offer faster CPUs and competitive power drain.

The first x86-based community supported hacker SBCs not backed by Intel or AMD have reached market, offering higher prices than most ARM SBCs, but featuring faster processors and competitive power consumption. The Kickstarter-backed newcomers, all of which run Linux or Android, include the now-shipping JaguarBoard, the soon to ship UP board, and the Udoo X86, due in November.

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Tiny ARM9 COM and SBC support dual Ethernet and CAN

Filed under
Android
Linux

Boardcon’s 40 x 40mm “MINI287” COM runs Linux on an NXP i.MX287 SoC, offers dual Ethernet and CAN ports, and is also available as a sandwich-style SBC.

Thanks to the cost and power consumption sensitivities of the IoT market, old-time ARM9 system-on-chips continue to arrive in new embedded boards. Boardcon’s tiny (40 x 40mm) MINI287 computer-on-module taps the NXP/Freescale i.MX287, the highest-end member of the power-sipping i.MX28x SoC family, differentiated by its dual CAN interfaces, dual Ethernet ports, and L2 switch support. Boardcon recently released an Android-ready MINI3288 COM based on a Rockchip RK3288 SoC.

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Cinnamon 3.0 released!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

On behalf of the team and all the developers who contributed to this build, I am proud to announce the release of Cinnamon 3.0!

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Also: Cinnamon 3.0 Officially Announced

Raspberry Pi cameras jump to 8MP, keep $25 price

Filed under
Linux

The v2 Raspberry Pi Camera and low-light PiNoIR Camera advance from 5- to 8-megapixels via a Sony IMX219PQ sensor with improved image quality.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has replaced its official 5-megapixel Raspberry Pi Camera and night-vision Raspberry Pi NoIR Camera with improved 8-megapixel models. Like the older cameras, which are almost out of stock, the new cameras are priced at $25. As before, the Raspberry Pi PiNoIR camera is almost identical to the visible light camera except that it removes the infrared (IR) filter for improved imaging in the dark.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: KDE

  • LUKS support in KDE Partition Manager
  • Kate 16.04 on Windows (64bit)
  • The future of KApiDox
    I’ve been working hard to enhance KApiDox. I’d like to come back on what it is for, what I did and what I see for its future.
  • Danbooru Client 0.6.0 released
    It offers a convenient, KF5 and Qt5-based GUI coupled with a QML image view to browse, view, and download images hosted in two of the most famous Danbooru boards (konachan.com and yande.re).
  • A KMail Breakthrough.
    This tells the story of how I finally managed a successful transfer of email data from KMail version 1.13.6 to version 4.11.5. It is a non-technical essay exploring the obstacles I encountered, my options, and the methods I used to achieve my aim. It was written partly to give the information, but also with the hope that readers will both enjoy and be amused by the story of the "battle of KMail" that was ultimately won against "incredible odds". Links to the earlier articles discussing problems with KMail 4x are given at the end.
  • [GSoC] Kdev-Embedded, Debugging and programming embedded systems
    The actual embedded system word depends on closed-source IDEs and libraries, with high monetary value and deprecated functionalities. Programmers that would like to use ARM based boards without paying for an IDE will have problems setting up such development ambient and synchronized toolkits. The main idea of this project is to provide a plugin integrated with KDevelop to help the debugging and programming process of embedded systems like AVR, ARM and x86 based boards.