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Editing Subtitles in Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I have been a world movie and regional movies lover for decades. Subtitles are the essential tool that have enabled me to enjoy the best movies in various languages and from various countries.

If you enjoy watching movies with subtitles, you might have noticed that sometimes the subtitles are not synced or not correct.

Did you know that you can edit subtitles and make them better? Let me show you some basic subtitle editing in Linux.

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Best Free Linux Screen Capture Tools (Updated 2019)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

The phrase “A picture is worth a thousand words” refers to the idea that a solitary still image can provide as much information as a large amount of descriptive text. Essentially, pictures convey information more effectively and efficiently than words can.

A screenshot is an image captured by a computer to record the output of a visual device. Screen capture software enable screenshots to be taken on a computer. This type of software has a wide range of uses. As an image can illustrate the operation of computer software so well, screenshots play a crucial role in software development and documentation. Alternatively, if you have a technical problem with your computer, a screenshot allows a technical support department to understand the problems you are facing. Writing computer-related articles, documentation and tutorials is nigh on impossible without a good tool for creating screenshots.

Linux has a good selection of versatile open source screenshot programs, both graphical and console based. Our longstanding favorite was Shutter. Although the software is still under development, the software has only received bug fixes in recent years.

The two most popular desktop environments, GNOME and KDE, each offer a competent screenshot utility. However, the functionality offered by their screenshot utilities is relatively basic. Furthermore, some Linux users prefer to use an alternative desktop environment.

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Purism Announces 4K Librem 15 Linux Laptop, Updated CPU and GPU for Librem 13

Filed under
Linux

Purism is known for manufacturing and shipping security and privacy-focused laptops powered by Linux-based operating systems. They have their own GNU/Linux distribution called PureOS, based on the popular Debian GNU/Linux distribution, which they ship pre-installed with all their Librem laptops.

The company announced today a new hardware promotion where you can buy the Librem 13 and Librem 15 high-end laptop series with updated CPU and graphics, including the 7th Generation 3.50GHz Intel Core i7-7500U processors with two cores and four threads, with integrated Intel HD Graphics 620.

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Chromebook owners may soon be able to choose which Linux distro to use

Filed under
Linux

Midway through 2018, Google wowed many Chromebook users by allowing them to run desktop Linux apps on Chrome OS. Though this support currently works through a virtualized Linux, based on Debian, Google has been continuously improving the support. Features like graphics acceleration are lined up for future addition. And the company isn’t stopping there. It now plans to allow device managers to choose a Linux distro on which it runs.

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Entroware Launches Hades, Its First AMD-Powered Workstation with Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

With Hades, Entroware debut their first AMD-powered system that’s perfect for Deep Learning, a new area of Machine Learning (ML) research, but also for businesses, science labs, and animation studios. Entroware Hades can achieve all that thanks to its 2nd generation AMD Ryzen “Threadripper” processors with up to 64 threads, Nvidia GPUs with up to 11GB memory, and up to 128GB RAM and 68TB storage.

“The Hades workstation is our first AMD system and brings the very best of Linux power, by combining cutting edge components to provide the foundation for the most demanding applications or run even the most demanding Deep Learning projects at lightning speeds with impeccable precision,” says Entroware.

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Turn a Raspberry Pi 3B+ into a PriTunl VPN

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

PriTunl is a fantastic VPN terminator solution that's perfect for small businesses and individuals who want a quick and simple way to access their network privately. It's open source, and the basic free version is more than enough to get you started and cover most simple use cases. There is also a paid enterprise version with advanced features like Active Directory integration.

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Linux 5.0-rc2

Filed under
Linux

So the merge window had somewhat unusual timing with the holidays, and
I was afraid that would affect stragglers in rc2, but honestly, that
doesn't seem to have happened much. rc2 looks pretty normal.

Were there some missing commits that missed the merge window? Yes. But
no more than usual. Things look pretty normal.

What's a bit abnormal is that I'm traveling again, and so for me it's
a Monday release, but it's (intentionally) the usual "Sunday
afternoon" release schedule back home. I'm trying to not surprise
people too much.

Read more

Also: Linux 5.0-RC2 Kernel Released

Freespire Plan and Netrunner 19.01

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Freespire 5.0 "Coho" Planned for Mid-November 2019, Linspire 9.0 Comes Late 2020 [Ed: They have just shown their hand/cards]

    The development team behind the Freespire and Linspire GNU/Linux distributions have announced their roadmap for new releases during the 2019-2020 period.

    With the recent launch of Linspire 8.0, the development team kicks off the new year with big plans for the next major versions of their Linspire and Freespire operating systems. They recently informed Softpedia about the Linspire and Freespire development roadmap for 2019 and 2020.

  • [Netrunner 19.01 Released and] New Forums Software

    Starting today we have switched the old mybb forum to a new forums software called Discourse.

    For security reasons, anyone who already registered an account before needs to set a new password by selecting “Forgot password” from the Login popup:

‘Linux for Chromebooks’ May Let Chromebook Owners Choose Which Distro to Use

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Last year Google wowed Linux geeks the world over with a feature that lets Chromebook users run desktop Linux apps on Chrome OS.

The feature, dubbed ‘Crostini’ at the time, but now known by the catching title “Linux (beta) for Chromebooks”, continues to improve with each new dev update to Chrome OS (for instance, it will soon add graphics acceleration).

But Google isn’t stopping there.

The search giant now plans to extend the Linux (beta) for Chromebook feature to allow device managers to choose a Linux distro on which it runs.

As one distro does not fit all, this is an important development for developers in particular.

Someone working in the worlds of Red Hat want or prefer a set of tools, setups or distro-specific software configured in a certain way. Similarly, someone working with Snap apps on Ubuntu may prefer having an Ubuntu more beneficial while hacking around with Ubuntu specific technologies.

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Also: Global PC shipments fell for seventh straight year in 2018

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Zombie Panic! Source, Dicey Dungeon, NVIDIA RTX, Steam Play, Battle Motion, Ravva and the Cyclops Curse, Feudal Alloy

  • The Beta of Zombie Panic! Source was updated recently, should work better on Linux
    Zombie Panic! Source is currently going through an overhaul, as part of this it's coming to Linux with a version now in beta and the latest update should make it a better experience. [...] I personally haven't been able to make any of the events yet, so I have no real thoughts on the game. Once it's out of beta and all servers are updated, I will be taking a proper look as it looks fun. No idea when this version will leave beta, might be a while yet.
  • Dicey Dungeons, the new unique roguelike from Terry Cavanagh and co introduces quests
    We have a lot of roguelikes available on Linux (seriously, we do) yet Dicey Dungeons from Terry Cavanagh, Marlowe Dobbe, and Chipzel still remains fresh due to the rather unique game mechanics. I still can't get over how fun the dice mechanic is, as you slot dice into cards to perform actions. It's different, clever and works really well.
  • Quake 2 now has real-time path tracing with Vulkan
    If you have one of the more recent NVIDIA RTX graphics cards, here's an interesting project for you to try. Q2VKPT from developer Christoph Schied implements some really quite advanced techniques.
  • Steam Play versus Linux Version, a little performance comparison and more thoughts
    Now that Steam has the ability officially to override a Linux game and run it through Steam Play instead, let's take a quick look at some differences in performance. Before I begin, let's make something clear. I absolutely value the effort developers put into Linux games, I do think cross-platform development is incredibly important so we don't end up with more lock-in. However, let's be realistic for a moment. Technology moves on and it's not financially worth it to keep updating old games, they just don't sell as well as newer games (with exceptions of course). As the years go on, there will be more ways to run older games better and better, of that I've no doubt.
  • Battle Motion, a really silly massive fantasy battle game will have Linux support
    Sometimes when looking around for new games I come across something that really catches my eye, Battle Motion is one such game as it looks completely silly.
  • Ravva and the Cyclops Curse looks like a rather nice NES-inspired platformer
    Another lovely looking retro-inspired platformer! Ravva and the Cyclops Curse from developer Galope just released this week with Linux support.
  • Become a fish inside a robot in Feudal Alloy, out now with Linux support
    We've seen plenty of robots and we've seen a fair amount of fish, but have you seen a fish controlling a robot with a sword? Say hello to Feudal Alloy.

Addressing Icons Themes (Again)

I wrote some time ago on how platforms have a responsibility to respect the identity of applications, but now there’s some rumblings that Ubuntu’s community-built Yaru icon set (which is a derivative of the Suru icon set I maintain) intends to ignore this and infringe upon applications’ brands by modifying their icons... [...] For instance, the entire point of the GNOME icon refresh initiative is to address visual mismatches between third-party app icons and GNOME icons and we been have reaching out to developers to see about updating their icons to new design—this is the appropriate approach for a platform visual overhaul, by the way—which could always use more help on. Now I don’t see this ever happening, but I have hopes that someday Ubuntu will fully embrace GNOME and promote it as its desktop solution—especially given the desktop is out of the scope of the Ubuntu business these days. Read more

Wine 4.0 RC7

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 4.0-rc7 is now available.The Wine development release 4.0-rc7 is now available.
  • Juicy like the good stuff, Wine 4.0 RC7 is out with a delightful aroma
    No need to worry about a sour aftertaste here, we're of course talking about the wonderful software and not the tasty liquid. As usual, they're in bug-fix mode while they attempt to make the best version of Wine they can and so no super huge features made it in.
  • Wine 4.0-RC7 Released With Fixes For Video Player Crashes, Game Performance Issues
    Wine 4.0 should be officially out soon, but this weekend the latest test release of it is Release Candidate 7 that brings more than one dozen fixes. Wine 4.0 remains in a feature freeze until its release, which will likely be within the next two weeks or so. Since last Friday's Wine 4.0-RC6, the RC7 release has 13 known bug fixes. Catching our interest are some game performance regressions being resolved, including for Hot Pursuit, Project CARS, Gas Guzzlers, and others. There are also video player crash fixes when opening audio or video files.

Wikipedia cofounder: How and why I transitioned to Linux—how you can, too

My first introduction to the command line was in the 80s when I first started learning about computers and, like many geeky kids of the time, wrote my first BASIC computer programs. But it wasn’t until my job starting Nupedia (and then Wikipedia) that I spent much time on the Bash command line. (Let me explain. “Bash” means “Bourne-again shell,” a rewrite of the class Unix shell “sh.” A “shell” is a program for interacting with the computer by processing terse commands to do basic stuff like find and manipulate files; a terminal, or terminal emulator, is a program that runs a shell. The terminal is what shows you that command line, where you type your commands like “move this file there” and “download that file from this web address” and “inject this virus into that database”. The default terminal used by Linux Ubuntu, for example, is called Gnome Terminal–which runs Bash, the standard Linux shell.) Even then (and in the following years when I got into programming again), I didn’t learn much beyond things like cd (switch directory) and ls (list directory contents). It was then, around 2002, that I first decided to install Linux. Back then, maybe the biggest “distro” (flavor of Linux) was Red Hat Linux, so that’s what I installed. I remember making a partition (dividing the hard disk into parts, basically) and dual-booting (installing and making it possible to use both) Linux and Windows. It was OK, but it was also rather clunky and much rougher and much less user-friendly than the Windows of the day. So I didn’t use it much. Read more