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Linux

Linux Mint 17/17.1 KDE and Xfce Users Can Now Upgrade to Linux Mint 17.2

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Linux

Clement Lefebvre, leader of the Linux Mint project, has announced on July 23 that the upgrade path from the Linux Mint 17 (Qiana) and Linux Mint 17.1 (Rebecca) distributions to the Linux Mint 17.2 (Rafaela) operating system is now open for all editions.

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Linux 4.3 Will Have Many Intel Graphics Improvements, Better For Skylake

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Linux

Daniel Vetter of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has sent in many Intel DRM driver changes to be queued up in DRM-Next for the Linux 4.3 kernel.

This drm-intel-next load is quite big given that there's three batches of changes due to Vetter having held off on sending out this pull request for the code to land in DRM-Next.

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Bodhi Releases Roadmap, Mint 17.2 KDE Upgrade Ready

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GNU
Linux

Jeff Hoogland today posted some updated information for fans of his Bodhi Linux distributions as well as requesting help testing new desktop Moksha. Elsewhere, Clement Lefebvre today said the upgrade path from 17.0 and 17.1 to 17.2 is now open to all. Also, The Linux Foundation today announced its keynote speakers for upcoming conferences in Dublin and QEMU is the Software Freedom Conservancy's newest member.

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Linux Foundation offers cheaper courses and certifications for India

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Linux
OSS

This makes India the first region in which the Linux Foundation will offer country-specific pricing on select training and certification products.

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Samsung launches additional information services for Tizen TV

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Linux

Samsung Electronics have announced the addition of four services that provide real-time on-screen Information on their Tizen based Smart TVs. You can display Information that relates to sports, news, entertainment, and social. The Information is displayed on the right hand side of the screen on a transparent window, and can be accessed via the TV remote when the viewer is watching cable TV or IPTV.

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How I finally got permission to use my own computer

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GNU
Linux

As I learned more about Linux, it became easier to use with time. I was impressed by the contributions of open source developers to it as well. Use cases that were really hard for me at first became easier as more advancements were made in the Linux community. At one point, finding and installing codecs to play multimedia files was annoying, but later it became a cinch. Proprietary drivers (when absolutely necessary) required me to recompile my kernel, but it is now often just a checkbox. Free drivers have also made leaps and bounds.

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Feral Interactive Is Teasing New Linux Port on Twitter

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Linux

Feral Interactive is one of the major studios out there that are porting important games for Linux users, and it looks like they are planning something big, but they don't want to announce anything for certain.

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Leftovers: Devices

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Linux
  • Google’s iBeacon competitor ‘Eddystone’ expands capability of Bluetooth beacons
  • Three wireless advances target Linux and Android devices
  • Short-Range Wireless Tech for IoT Takes Three Big Steps [same article]

    One reason Linux -- and by extension Android -- have grown so quickly in embedded is that from very early on Linux was imbued with strong wireless support. Although ARM and others are working hard to improve wireless support on microcontrollers with efforts such as ARM's Mbed OS, for the most part if your gizmo needs WiFi, you need to set aside MCUs and RTOSes and move to Linux or Android running on a faster processor.

  • Tizen Store Opens for Paid Apps in Nepal, Samsung Z1 Launch Inches Closer

    Today, the Tizen Store has launched its paid service in Nepal, meaning developers can now sell paid applications to 4 countries – India , Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and now Nepal. Last week we spotted the firmware file for the Samsung Z1 Nepal and now with todays announcement the launch should be within a matter of weeks.

  • Android M: 5 small but important features you’re going to love

    Android M isn’t going to be a massive game-changer like Android 5.0 Lollipop was. However, it will have some small-but-important tweaks and improvements that will noticeably improve the consumer experience. Green Bot recently put together a slideshow of the small changes Google has made with Android M and we’ve picked out five of them that we think Android diehards will love. Check them out below and be sure to check out Green Bot’s full slideshow by clicking here.

  • Commodore's Ghost Lives in New Machine

    The device, named the "Commodore PET," runs Android 5.0 Lollipop, and has a 5.5-inch full HD 1920 x 1080 IPS OGS display.

    It has a 1.7-GHz 64-bit octa-core CPU, up to 3 GB of RAM, an earphone jack, a microUSB slot, dual SIM cards, and a 3,000 mAh removable battery.

    The PET runs on 4G LTE, GSM and WCDMA networks.

Solus Operating System Is Now Based on Linux Kernel 4.1.3 LTS

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OS
Linux

The Solus operating system has received a set of updates and developers made some important changes, like the adoption of a new Linux kernel of a new GTK+ version.

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Linux Kernel 3.18.19 LTS Adds x86, Btrfs, ARM, and UFS Improvements, Updated Drivers

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Linux

A new maintenance release of the long-term supported Linux 3.18 kernel series has been announced on July 21 by none other than its maintainer, Sasha Levin. Linux kernel 3.18.19 LTS is now available for download.

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GitHub rumor confirmed: It raised $250M at $2B valuation

Leftovers: OSS

  • NPR Open Sources "Lunchbox" Tools for Cloud and Social Graphics
    Whether you do some blogging, work as a journalist or just make use of popular social media and cloud computing tools, you probably regularly need to acquire and customize publishable graphics. The good people at NPR are out to make that job easier.
  • 6 top continuous integration tools
    Continuous integration (CI) is an integral part of an agile software development setup. Sprint after sprint, teams strive to "not break the build" while delivering incremental features. But when developers focus completely on adding features, code errors can sometimes creep in and render the software unusable. To stop such errors from being integrated into the software configuration management (SCM), a CI server is the gatekeeper that helps keep a tab on code quality. Even if the code is integrated to SCM, a CI server can quickly tell you what went wrong. In this post, let's take a look at six open source CI server tools that you can use in your agile setup.
  • Now SourceForge For Sale
    After a run of bad publicity and floundering to retain and attract users, parent company DHI today announced SourceForge.net and Slashdot.org are for sale. DHi said the reason was due to a refocus on their employment services. Elsewhere, CoreOS CEO Alex Polvi spoke with InfoWorld.com's Paul Krill about cloud strategies and OpenSource.com wants to know what is your favorite desktop environment. It's been a rough year for SourceForge. SourceForge began last Summer by asking users to change their passwords for now reason at all before finally admitting the database had been hacked. Then they were found to be taking over software sources that appeared to have been abandoned and adding spyware into bundled installers. Later projects began fleeing in droves and SourceForge began a campaign to soften their image by reaching out and communicating more with "the community." Today their owner announced the immediate availability of SourceForge.net and as an added bonus, if you dial before midnight tonight, you'll get Slashdot.org too. The announcement said the sale was due to "not successfully [leveraging] the Slashdot user base to further Dice's digital recruitment business." No asking price was given, but DHi paid $20 million for the sites in 2012.
  • Nóirín Plunkett: Remembering Them
    Today I learned of some of the worst kind of news, my friend and a valuable contributor to the great open source community Nóirín Plunkett passed away. They (this is their preferred pronoun per their twitter profile) was well regarded in the open source community for contributions.
  • Getting physical: A $10 device to clone RFID access keys on the go
    A $10 device capable of skimming access cards on the go is soon to be released into the open-source community. Radio-frequency identification (RFID) cards are a quick and convenient way for businesses to track as and when their employees are on site, and also act as a way to both restrict and permit access to particular corporate locations. While RFID technology can help secure enterprise offices in this way, the ease in which these access controls can be hacked has hit the spotlight in the form of a tiny device which costs only $10 to make.
  • OpenDaylight Beryllium Takes Shape
    Colin Dixon, Technical Steering Committee Chair (TSC) at the OpenDaylight Project and a Principal Engineer at Brocade, said that the thing he's most proud of during the Lithium release cycle was that it landed on time, without too much pain. He commented that the maturity of the overall project has grown over the last two years, making a stable release cadence possible.

Coverity Report Finds Open Source Code Quality Beats Commercial Code

Synopsys has announced the release of its annual Coverity Scan Open Source Report, which is widely followed. The 2014 report details the analysis of nearly 10 billion lines of source code through the Coverity Scan service and commercial usage of the Synopsys Testing Platform. For the report, the company analyzed code from more than 2,500 open source C/C++ projects as well as an anonymous sample of commercial projects in 2014. Additionally, the report highlights results from several popular, open source Java and C# projects that have joined the Coverity Scan service since March 2013. Here are findings. Read more Also: Coverity Scan Open Source Report Shows Commercial Code Is More Compliant to Security Standards than Open Source Code

DragonFlyBSD Has Full-Acceleration Now Working For Intel Broadwell Graphics

Francois Tigeot's latest effort on porting the Intel i915 DRM code from the Linux kernel to DragonFlyBSD has paid off in the form of full acceleration for Broadwell "Gen8" HD/Iris Graphics. Tigeot issued a call for testing a few days back of an update to the i915 DRM code that would position the DragonFlyBSD's code at the stage of the Linux 3.16 kernel. This updated code should fix some issues that previously caused X.Org Server crashes, correct outstanding bugs, improve performance for all GPU generations, and provide much improved support for Broadwell graphics. He noted that the Broadwell GPUs on DragonFlyBSD should now be fully accelerated with this new code. Read more