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Chromebook and PCs With GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • How to Install Ubuntu 17.04 with GNOME on Your Chromebook, Alongside Chrome OS

    Last year when I got my Acer Chromebook 11 (C740), I wrote a tutorial to teach you guys how to remove Google Chrome OS and install a GNU/Linux distribution of your choice, but things got boring.

    So after a few months, I reinstalled Chrome OS using a recovery image that Google provides on their website for this sort of things, which I wrote on a USB flash drive and booted from my Chromebook. Recently, I got bored again, and so I decided to install Ubuntu on my Acer Chromebook 11 (C740) using Crouton.

  • Is Chrome OS right for you? A 3-question quiz to find out

    Google's Chrome OS is one of the world's most misunderstood computing platforms. Chromebooks are foundationally different from traditional PCs, after all -- and consequently, there are a lot of misconceptions about how they work and what they can and cannot do.

    Since people are always asking me whether a Chromebook might be right for their needs, I thought I'd put together a quick guide to help any such wonderers figure it out. Whether it's you or someone you know who's curious, the following three questions should help shed some light on what the platform's all about and for whom it makes sense.

  • Lenovo Flex 11 Chromebook Review: Built To Last

    Chromebooks are continuing to make an impact on the market and as a result, more Chromebooks are getting announced and almost on a monthly basis now. One of the most recent Chromebooks to be announced (April 2017) was the Lenovo Flex 11 Chromebook. This is a Chromebook which looks to combine the standard Chrome OS experience with a device that is durable and hardworking. While also looking to ensure the price is competitive by Chromebook standards. In this case, the Lenovo Flex 11 Chromebook is priced at $279.99 for the baseline model.

  • Dell XPS 15 (2017) review: Kaby Lake and a 4K display make a difference
  • My story until GSoC 2017

    It’s almost 9 years I am using GNU/Linux as my default Operating System. The first time I used GNU/Linux was in 2008, when I wanted to crack the password of the computers of my school in order to install and play the games I wanted. So my first contact with GNU/Linux was through OPHCrack. I was absolutely impressed when I could get the password of the computers of my school in less than ten minutes. I was 14 and I think I wanted to be a hacker. Goals changed through time, though.

Linus Torvalds Explains How Linux Still Surprises and Motivates Him

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Linux

Linus Torvalds took to the stage in China for the first time Monday at LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China in Beijing. In front of a crowd of nearly 2,000, Torvalds spoke with VMware Head of Open Source Dirk Hohndel in one of their famous “fireside chats” about what motivates and surprises him and how aspiring open source developers can get started. Here are some highlights of their talk.

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SparkyLinux 4.6 Released as First GNU/Linux Distro Based on Debian 9 "Stretch"

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Linux
Debian

The Polish developers behind the Debian-based SparkyLinux GNU/Linux distribution were proud to announce today the general availability of the final SparkyLinux 4.6 release codenamed Tyche.

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Upcoming Events: Linux Foundation Open Source Summit North America and All Systems Go! 2017

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Linux
OSS
  • Session Lineup Announced for The Linux Foundation Open Source Summit North America

    The Linux Foundation Open Source Summit is the premier open source technical conference in North America, gathering 2,000 developers, operators and community leadership professionals to collaborate, share information and learn about the latest in open technologies, including Linux, containers, cloud computing and more.

  • All Systems Go! 2017 CfP Open

    All Systems Go! is an Open Source community conference focused on the projects and technologies at the foundation of modern Linux systems — specifically low-level user-space technologies. Its goal is to provide a friendly and collaborative gathering place for individuals and communities working to push these technologies forward.

Tizen News: Xender, TVs and More

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Linux

Security: Brutal Kangaroo Targets Windows, Linux Updates Available, Reproducible Builds, and Patching Stack Clash

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Security
  • Brutal Kangaroo

    Today, June 22nd 2017, WikiLeaks publishes documents from the Brutal Kangaroo project of the CIA. Brutal Kangaroo is a tool suite for Microsoft Windows that targets closed networks by air gap jumping using thumbdrives. Brutal Kangaroo components create a custom covert network within the target closed network and providing functionality for executing surveys, directory listings, and arbitrary executables.

    The documents describe how a CIA operation can infiltrate a closed network (or a single air-gapped computer) within an organization or enterprise without direct access. It first infects a Internet-connected computer within the organization (referred to as "primary host") and installs the BrutalKangaroo malware on it. When a user is using the primary host and inserts a USB stick into it, the thumbdrive itself is infected with a separate malware. If this thumbdrive is used to copy data between the closed network and the LAN/WAN, the user will sooner or later plug the USB disk into a computer on the closed network. By browsing the USB drive with Windows Explorer on such a protected computer, it also gets infected with exfiltration/survey malware. If multiple computers on the closed network are under CIA control, they form a covert network to coordinate tasks and data exchange. Although not explicitly stated in the documents, this method of compromising closed networks is very similar to how Stuxnet worked.

    The Brutal Kangaroo project consists of the following components: Drifting Deadline is the thumbdrive infection tool, Shattered Assurance is a server tool that handles automated infection of thumbdrives (as the primary mode of propagation for the Brutal Kangaroo suite), Broken Promise is the Brutal Kangaroo postprocessor (to evaluate collected information) and Shadow is the primary persistence mechanism (a stage 2 tool that is distributed across a closed network and acts as a covert command-and-control network; once multiple Shadow instances are installed and share drives, tasking and payloads can be sent back-and-forth).

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Reproducible Builds: week 112 in Stretch cycle
  • 5 things you need to know about Stack Clash to secure your shared Linux environment

    The vulnerability is present in Unix-based systems on i386 and amd64 architectures. Affected Linux distributions include Red Hat, Debian, Ubuntu, SUSE, CentOS and Gentoo. Solaris is owned by Oracle. FreeBSD, OpenBSD and NetBSD are also impacted. Qualys has been working with distributions and vendors since May to get the vulnerabilities fixed, and the updates are just beginning to be released. Administrators need to act promptly to update affected machines with the security updates.

Debian 9.0.1 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian
  • New live images released (9.0.1)

    We found multiple issues in the live images released at the weekend. Since then, I've been working on fixes for the worst problems. I've just published a new set of images as 9.0.1.

  • Debian Re-Releases All Live Images of Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Due to Bugs

    Debian developer and the team lead of "debian-cd" Steve McIntyre announced on the project's mailing list that he and his team worked hard during the past 72 hours or so to rebuild all the live images of the new Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" release.

    Launched this past weekend, Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" is now the most stable and advanced release of the acclaimed Linux-based operating system, shipping with tons of new features and updated technologies. The OS has been in development for the past two years.

Linux vs. Windows Server OS Comparison

Filed under
OS
Linux
Microsoft

A comparison between Linux and Windows while selecting the server operating system is like being in stalemate while playing the chess game where the outcome is unpredictable. Various versions of the Microsoft—from Windows—and the Linux-based operating systems are available in plenty today. But deciding the best option is a tougher task, rather, finding the right solution that fits the organizational requirements is easier.

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Best Linux Distro: Linux Experts Rate Distros

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Linux

Looking over this list, I notice that innovative, security-based, and community-developed distributions. However, I am not consistent in these preferences, since I do not include perfectly good alternatives like openSUSE or Linux Mint.

Still, one thing a list like this makes clear is that the total number of distributions might be declining, but the diversity of Linux variants is as strong as ever. Even if you don't find any of these choices to your liking, dig around and you should find several distributions that you can live with.

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Creating screencasts on Linux

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Linux

As this is a new blog on Fedora Planet, let me start off by introducing myself briefly. My name is Maxim Burgerhout, and I have been a Fedora contributor for quite some time. Truth be told though, I haven’t been able to spend much time maintaining my packages over the past couple of years. As a different way of giving back, I want to start sharing some experiences with open source software in a specific niche: screencast creation, and video editing.

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Entroware Launches Two New Ubuntu Laptops, for Linux Gaming and Office Use

Entroware, the UK-based hardware manufacturer, known for delivering high-quality, Linux-based desktops, laptops, and servers solutions powered by the popular Ubuntu operating system, today announced two new products. Read more

Why The Ubuntu Phone Failed

In April 2017, Canonical's Mark Shuttleworth announced that their support of the Ubuntu phone convergence was no longer something they were going to invest in. Looking back on this decision, I can understand where they were coming from. Let's face it, we live in an Android/iOS landscape and all other entries into this space are just spinning their wheels. Considering other projects that failed to garner needed traction such as WebOS, Firefox OS, among others, it's understandable why Canonical decided to refocus their efforts into other areas. Well, at least with cloud services. I differ with them on IoT and believe they're destined to repeat mistakes found with convergence. Read more

Intel Core i9 7900X Linux Benchmarks

Since the Intel Core-X Series were announced last month at Computex, I've been excited to see how well this high-end processor will perform under Linux... Linux enthusiasts have plenty of highly-threaded workloads such as compiling the Linux kernel, among other packages, and thus have been very excited by the potential of the Core i9 7900X with its ten cores plus Hyper Threading and sporting a 13.75MB cache. With finally having an X299 motherboard ready, here are my initial Ubuntu Linux benchmarks for the i9-7900X. Read more

KDE Plasma 5.10.3 Desktop Environment Improves Plasma Discover's Flatpak Backend

Today the KDE Project announced the release and general availability of the third stable update to the KDE Plasma 5.10 desktop environment, which was unveiled at the end of May 2017. Read more