Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

Teen Builds Linux Workaround For iTunes

Filed under
Linux

Cody Brocious is a 17-year old 11th grader from Chamberburg, Pa. likes using the Linux operating system more than he does Microsoft's Windows or Apple Computer's Mac OS. But Apple doesn't make software that would let Linux users like Brocious buy songs from the iTunes store, so he did what any 21st-century teen raised in the digital age would do--he and his friends wrote a program to do so themselves.

Linux consortium gets valley boost

Filed under
Linux

Silicon Graphics Inc. of Mountain View, which makes computers for the likes of scientists and graphic artists, is becoming an industry sponsor for the federation, an international research consortium with the mission of advancing open source software in the form of the Linux OS Intel Itanium 2 platform.

My workstation OS: PCLinuxOS Preview 8

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

I found the GNOME desktop more appealing than KDE until I found Mandrakelinux 10. Mandrake looked good to me, from its fonts to its slide bars. On the functional side, it had some wonderful system administration tools, graphical and centralized. But for some reason Mandrake 10 didn't find my home wireless network. That led me to search for alternatives. I discovered PCLinuxOS, a free LiveCD distribution originally based on Mandrake.

Read More

War of words over operating systems' safety

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Security

Doubts were cast this week over the security of three major software systems formerly regarded as safe havens from hacker attacks and viruses.

But experts argue that despite the new findings, these systems are still more secure than their Microsoft counterparts because hackers overwhelmingly target the Windows software.

Microsoft vs Linux Reports - Sheer Waste Of Time?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Praveen Kurup fires back at that Security Innovations report that stated windows is more secure than linux. They point out several statements contained within that reveal "a few discrepancies that question its credibility."

Linux lags Windows in new security report

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Security

A M$ funded report released today indicates Windows Server 2003 may actually be more secure than its most popular Linux competitors.

It isn't like it was 'co-funded' by both Microsoft and Red Hat," said Michael D. "Mick" Bauer, senior editor of Linux Journal.

Linux firms not impressed with Microsoft's customer win

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft's latest customer win has failed to impress members of the open source community, who insist that it doesn't prove that Windows is superior to Linux.

Richard Carlson, the head of business systems at RICS, admitted that the company did not do a comparative study of Linux and Windows.

Microsoft contract win put down to Linux skills shortage

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft may find a monopoly on developers will help it maintain its grip on the software market in the face of Linux alternatives.

The Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors said that the decision to go with Microsoft was taken very early on before the job was put out to tender - on the basis that RICS' in-house developers were in the main Microsoft coders.

Maybe they should have called these guys.

unix motorcycle

Filed under
Linux
Sci/Tech

"some of you are probably rubbing your eyes, but you read it correctly. unix on a motorcycle.

a fellow by the name of ben installed a freebsd powered pc into his kawasaki z1000. a webcam on his helmet connects to a video capture board in the pc, which he uses to record movies of trips to the burrito store. his future plans are to have the freebsd box control his ipod, track gps data, and potentially interconnect with the bike’s ecu."

Story and links on hackaday.

Linux drives Renault Formula 1

Filed under
Linux
Sci/Tech

The Renault Formula 1 team is running simulations and crucial telemetry applications on Linux clusters from IBM, and it's pleased with the results.

The IT team behind the Renault Formula 1 team has dramatically cut the time it takes to test new features by using Linux, Renault said on Tuesday.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Drill: New Desktop File Search Utility That Uses Clever Crawling Instead Of Indexing

Drill is a new file search utility that uses "clever crawling" instead of indexing, for Linux, Windows and macOS. The application can locate files and folders, but it does not search file contents. It's designed for desktops, using a Gtk GUI by default, but there's also a command line frontend available, albeit quite minimal right now (a Ncurses backend is on the todo list as well). Read more

Amp Up Your Linux Music Library With DeaDBeeF

There are a ton of great music players for Linux, and most of them have a pretty strong following. What makes DeaDBeeF stand out? In a word, it’s customization. DeaDBeeF is as close to a DIY music player as you’re going to get without making the jump to the command line. DeaDBeeF lets you customize the entire layout of your music player, how your library is arranged, and which information is displayed when you play a song. Plus, it’s highly extensible, and there are plenty of excellent plugins that open up even more options for how you can customize and control your listening experience. Read more

AMD Radeon VII Linux Performance vs. NVIDIA Gaming On Ubuntu For Q2'2019

It's been three months now since the AMD Radeon VII 7nm "Vega 20" graphics card was released and while we hopefully won't be waiting much longer for Navi to make its debut, for the time being this is the latest and great AMD Radeon consumer graphics card -- priced at around $700 USD. Here are some fresh benchmarks of the Radeon VII on Linux and compared to various high-end NVIDIA graphics cards while all testing happened from Ubuntu 19.04. Fortunately, the open-source Radeon VII Linux support is in fact in great shape. There was some confusion for some weeks and a lack of benchmarks recently since I had been unable to get my Vega 20 graphics card running reliably. Under different OpenGL/Vulkan workloads and even some desktop tasks, the graphics card would freeze and spewing from dmesg would most often be a load of VMC page faults and other errors stemming from AMDGPU. But after a lot of testing, ultimately it was figured out the graphics card became defective in some manner. The original card was a pre-launch Radeon VII review sample and was my lone Vega 20 GPU but has now been fortunately replaced by AMD. I received a new Radeon VII last week and since then has been under near constant load/testing. This new card has been working out well and I haven't encountered any issues with this retail card, unlike the woes I experienced with the original VII a few weeks after launch. It was a bit surprising the original Radeon VII failed especially without having done any over-clocking to it (granted was pushed very hard for a few weeks with all of my benchmarking workloads), but whatever the case, this retail Radeon VII is working out fine on Ubuntu 19.04 and various kernel/Mesa upgrades. Read more