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Linux

You Get What You Pay For

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Security

Purely objective information about security issues is becoming one of the scarcest commodities in the tech industry.

Teen Builds Linux Workaround For iTunes

Filed under
Linux

Cody Brocious is a 17-year old 11th grader from Chamberburg, Pa. likes using the Linux operating system more than he does Microsoft's Windows or Apple Computer's Mac OS. But Apple doesn't make software that would let Linux users like Brocious buy songs from the iTunes store, so he did what any 21st-century teen raised in the digital age would do--he and his friends wrote a program to do so themselves.

Linux consortium gets valley boost

Filed under
Linux

Silicon Graphics Inc. of Mountain View, which makes computers for the likes of scientists and graphic artists, is becoming an industry sponsor for the federation, an international research consortium with the mission of advancing open source software in the form of the Linux OS Intel Itanium 2 platform.

My workstation OS: PCLinuxOS Preview 8

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

I found the GNOME desktop more appealing than KDE until I found Mandrakelinux 10. Mandrake looked good to me, from its fonts to its slide bars. On the functional side, it had some wonderful system administration tools, graphical and centralized. But for some reason Mandrake 10 didn't find my home wireless network. That led me to search for alternatives. I discovered PCLinuxOS, a free LiveCD distribution originally based on Mandrake.

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War of words over operating systems' safety

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Security

Doubts were cast this week over the security of three major software systems formerly regarded as safe havens from hacker attacks and viruses.

But experts argue that despite the new findings, these systems are still more secure than their Microsoft counterparts because hackers overwhelmingly target the Windows software.

Microsoft vs Linux Reports - Sheer Waste Of Time?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Praveen Kurup fires back at that Security Innovations report that stated windows is more secure than linux. They point out several statements contained within that reveal "a few discrepancies that question its credibility."

Linux lags Windows in new security report

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Security

A M$ funded report released today indicates Windows Server 2003 may actually be more secure than its most popular Linux competitors.

It isn't like it was 'co-funded' by both Microsoft and Red Hat," said Michael D. "Mick" Bauer, senior editor of Linux Journal.

Linux firms not impressed with Microsoft's customer win

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft's latest customer win has failed to impress members of the open source community, who insist that it doesn't prove that Windows is superior to Linux.

Richard Carlson, the head of business systems at RICS, admitted that the company did not do a comparative study of Linux and Windows.

Microsoft contract win put down to Linux skills shortage

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft may find a monopoly on developers will help it maintain its grip on the software market in the face of Linux alternatives.

The Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors said that the decision to go with Microsoft was taken very early on before the job was put out to tender - on the basis that RICS' in-house developers were in the main Microsoft coders.

Maybe they should have called these guys.

unix motorcycle

Filed under
Linux
Sci/Tech

"some of you are probably rubbing your eyes, but you read it correctly. unix on a motorcycle.

a fellow by the name of ben installed a freebsd powered pc into his kawasaki z1000. a webcam on his helmet connects to a video capture board in the pc, which he uses to record movies of trips to the burrito store. his future plans are to have the freebsd box control his ipod, track gps data, and potentially interconnect with the bike’s ecu."

Story and links on hackaday.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News/Leftovers

Cloudgizer: An introduction to a new open source web development tool

Cloudgizer is a free open source tool for building web applications. It combines the ease of scripting languages with the performance of C, helping manage the development effort and run-time resources for cloud applications. Cloudgizer works on Red Hat/CentOS Linux with the Apache web server and MariaDB database. It is licensed under Apache License version 2. Read more

James Bottomley on Linux, Containers, and the Leading Edge

It’s no secret that Linux is basically the operating system of containers, and containers are the future of the cloud, says James Bottomley, Distinguished Engineer at IBM Research and Linux kernel developer. Bottomley, who can often be seen at open source events in his signature bow tie, is focused these days on security systems like the Trusted Platform Module and the fundamentals of container technology. Read more

TransmogrifAI From Salesforce

  • Salesforce plans to open-source the technology behind its Einstein machine-learning services
    Salesforce is open-sourcing the method it has developed for using machine-learning techniques at scale — without mixing valuable customer data — in hopes other companies struggling with data science problems can benefit from its work. The company plans to announce Thursday that TransmogrifAI, which is a key part of the Einstein machine-learning services that it believes are the future of its flagship Sales Cloud and related services, will be available for anyone to use in their software-as-a-service applications. Consisting of less than 10 lines of code written on top of the widely used Apache Spark open-source project, it is the result of years of work on training machine-learning models to predict customer behavior without dumping all of that data into a common training ground, said Shubha Nabar, senior director of data science for Salesforce Einstein.
  • Salesforce open-sources TransmogrifAI, the machine learning library that powers Einstein
    Machine learning models — artificial intelligence (AI) that identifies relationships among hundreds, thousands, or even millions of data points — are rarely easy to architect. Data scientists spend weeks and months not only preprocessing the data on which the models are to be trained, but extracting useful features (i.e., the data types) from that data, narrowing down algorithms, and ultimately building (or attempting to build) a system that performs well not just within the confines of a lab, but in the real world.