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Stable kernel 2.6.17.9 released

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Linux

The 2.6.17.9 stable kernel release is out. It is a single-patch release for a security issue which, being specific to the PowerPC architecture, will not affect most users.

The state of the 2006 Linux desktop

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Linux

Were you to walk around LinuxWorld in San Francisco this week, for almost every person you'd see sitting, you'd see a laptop in front of them. And, if you're a snoopy person, like me, you'd also see that about half of those laptops were running Linux.

That doesn't sound like that much? Think again.

LinuxWorld, virtually speaking

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Linux

I'm at LinuxWorld in San Francisco this week, and it's as interesting, stimulating, and fun as you might imagine. There's a lot going on here, and much of it relates to security. In fact, it sometimes seems like I'm hearing reactions to, and support for, many of the columns I've written in this very space over the years. In particular, one topic strongly stood out for me, but from a new angle that deserves examination.

Sharp Zaurus SL-C3200

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Linux

The Zaurus is in a class by itself, being a cross between a PDA and a handheld computer. Rather than running a somewhat limited PDA operating system, it runs Linux which means the CPU and RAM are the only real limit for running Linux applications.

Why is Linux Successful?

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Linux

The success of Linux over the past 15 years boils down to a few key factors, according to a panel of Linux luminaries. Larry Augustin, chairman of VA Software, Eric Raymond, founder of the Open Source Institute, Jon maddog Hall of Linux International, Chris DiBona of Google, and Dirk Hohndel of Intel regaled the capacity crowd with tales of their first experiences with Linux and Linus.

Red Hat Accuses Novell of Being 'Irresponsible' About Xen

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Linux

Red Hat CTO Brian Stevens escalated to new heights the debate over whether the open source Xen virtualization technology is ready for prime-time, saying Novell was being irresponsible and risked damaging enterprises' first experiences with Xen.

Linux-based HandyPC to challenge Nokia Communicator

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Linux

German phone maker Road has announced its answer to Nokia's Communicator. Dubbed the HandyPC, the phone-computer combo is based on the Linux operating system and Trolltech's Qtopia GUI. It's a quad-band GSM/GPRS/EDGE device with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth on board too.

ZABBIX monitoring System installation with screenshots

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Linux

ZABBIX is software that monitors numerous parameters of a network and the health and integrity of servers. ZABBIX uses a flexible notification mechanism that allows users to configure e-mail based alerts for virtually any event.

Where's Red Hat? Peek Under Fedora

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Linux

Red Hat may be the world's leading enterprise Linux distribution vendor, but the company is a no-show as an exhibitor at the LinuxWorld conference here. But Fedora, Red Hat's community-based distribution, is front and center.

Linux jobs abound, tech job service says

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Linux

Online IT job clearinghouse Dice Inc. has some interesting statistics to accompany LinuxWorld. As of August 1, there were 7,000 jobs opportunities on Dice.com for technology professionals with Linux experience. This is up 35.6 percent from the beginning of the year and 55 percent higher than 12 months ago, the service reports.

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More in Tux Machines

Stable kernels 5.0.3, 4.20.17, 4.19.30, 4.14.107 and 4.9.164

  • Linux 5.0.3
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.0.3 kernel. All users of the 5.0 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.0.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.0.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...
  • Linux 4.20.17
  • Linux 4.19.30
  • Linux 4.14.107
  • Linux 4.9.164

Firefox 66 Released

Firefox now prevents websites from automatically playing sound. You can add individual sites to an exceptions list or turn blocking off. Read more Also: Firefox 66 Arrives - Blocks Auto-Playing Sounds, Hides Title Bar By Default For Linux

Mozilla/Firefox: Reducing Your Online Annoyances, This Week in Servo Development and Vista 10 Integration

  • Today’s Firefox Aims to Reduce Your Online Annoyances
    Almost a hundred years ago, John Maynard Keyes suggested that the industrial revolution would effectively end work for humans within a couple of generations, and our biggest challenge would be figuring what to do with that time. That definitely hasn’t happened, and we always seem to have lots to do, much of it online. When you’re on the web, you’re trying to get stuff done, and therefore online annoyances are just annoyances. Whether it’s autoplaying videos, page jumps or finding a topic within all your multiple tabs, Firefox can help. Today’s Firefox release minimizes those online inconveniences, and puts you back in control.
  • This Week In Servo 127
    In the past week, we merged 50 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.
  • Passwordless Web Authentication Support via Windows Hello
    Firefox 66, being released this week, supports using the Windows Hello feature for Web Authentication on Windows 10, enabling a passwordless experience on the web that is hassle-free and more secure. Firefox has supported Web Authentication for all desktop platforms since version 60, but Windows 10 marks our first platform to support the new FIDO2 “passwordless” capabilities for Web Authentication.

Lessons in Vendor Lock-in: 3D Printers

One interesting thing about the hobbyist 3D printing market is that it was founded on free software and open hardware ideals starting with the RepRap project. The idea behind that project was to design a 3D printer from off-the-shelf parts that could print as many of its own parts as possible (especially more complex, custom parts like gears). Because of this, the first generation of 3D printers were all homemade using Arduinos, stepper motors, 3D-printed gears and hardware you could find in the local hardware store. As the movement grew, a few individuals started small businesses selling 3D printer kits that collected all the hardware plus the 3D printed parts and electronics for you to assemble at home. Later, these kits turned into fully assembled and supported printers, and after the successful Printrbot kickstarter campaign, the race was on to create cheaper and more user-friendly printers with each iteration. Sites like Thingiverse and YouMagine allowed people to create and share their designs, so even if you didn't have any design skills yourself, you could download and print everyone else's. These sites even provided the hardware diagrams for some of the more popular 3D printers. The Free Software ethos was everywhere you looked. Read more