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RaspEX Project Brings Kodi 18.1 and Linux Kernel 5.0 to Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

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Linux

Based on Debian GNU/Linux and Raspberry Pi's Raspbian operating systems, RaspEX Kodi Build 190321 is now available with the latest Kodi 18.1 "Leia" media center software featuring add-ons for watching Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, and Plex, as well as the lightweight LXDE desktop environment with VLC media player and NetworkManager.

RaspEX Kodi Build 190321 is also powered by the latest and greatest Linux 5.0 kernel series, which apparently works very well with the recently launched Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ single-board computer. However, while Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is recommended for RaspEX, you can also install it on a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B or the older Raspberry Pi 2 Model B.

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SparkyLinux Incinerates the Hassle Factor

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Linux
Reviews

SparkyLinux gives you an operating system that is out-of-the-box ready for use. It comes with multimedia plugins, selected sets of apps, and its own custom tools to ease different tasks.

SparkyLinux is a well-thought-out Linux OS. It has straightforward controls that let you get your work done without distractions. The user interface is friendly, intuitive and efficient.

SparkyLinux is a very functional Linux OS. It is a solid choice for use as an all-purpose home edition with all the tools, codecs, plugins and drivers preinstalled.

You may not need the USB installation. However, if your computer runs Microsoft Windows or another Linux distro, putting SparkyLinux on a USB stick is much easier than setting up a dual boot on the hard drive or replacing whatever is running on that computer already.

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Top 10 Android Emulators for Linux To Enjoy Android Apps in Linux

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OS
Android
GNU
Linux

Since smartphone came into our life, it has been influencing almost every spectrum of our socio-cultural movements. As a Linux power user, being able to run smartphone applications right into your computer means a lot to many. Android, the de-facto smartphone operating system used by people worldwide also leverages the Linux ecosystem to achieve its objectives. Android emulators are pieces of computer applications that let you run your favorite Android apps or games directly from your Linux system. In this guide, we’ll outline the top 10 best Android Emulators for Linux that you can use today to run playstore apps right into your Linux machine.

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Top 10 New Linux SBCs to Watch in 2019

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Linux

A recent Global Market Insights report projects the single board computer market will grow from $600 million in 2018 to $1 billion by 2025. Yet, you don’t need to read a market research report to realize the SBC market is booming. Driven by the trends toward IoT and AI-enabled edge computing, new boards keep rolling off the assembly lines, many of them tailored for highly specific applications.

Much of the action has been in Linux-compatible boards, including the insanely popular Raspberry Pi. The number of different vendors and models has exploded thanks in part to the rise of community-backed, open-spec SBCs.

Here we examine 10 of the most intriguing, Linux-driven SBCs among the many products announced in the last four weeks that bookended the recent Embedded World show in Nuremberg. (There was also some interesting Linux software news at the show.) Two of the SBCs—the Intel Whiskey Lake based UP Xtreme and Nvidia Jetson Nano driven Jetson Nano Dev Kit—were announced only this week.

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New PocketBeagle pocket sized Linux computer $29.95

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Linux
Hardware

If you are searching for an affordable and small yet powerful Linux computer, you may be interested in the new PocketBeagle Linux computer which offers just that for $29.95. The tiny computer is now available to purchase directly from the Adafruit online store and offers a powerful 1GHz AM3358 powered Linux single board computer with a tiny form factor and open source architecture.

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Kernel: LWN on Linux 5.1 and More, 'Lake'-named Hardware

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Linux
  • 5.1 Merge window part 1

    As of this writing, 6,135 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline repository for the 5.1 release. That is approximately halfway through the expected merge-window volume, which is a good time for a summary. A number of important new features have been merged for this release; read on for the details.

  • Controlling device peer-to-peer access from user space

    The recent addition of support for direct (peer-to-peer) operations between PCIe devices in the kernel has opened the door for different use cases. The initial work concentrated on in-kernel support and the NVMe subsystem; it also added support for memory regions that can be used for such transfers. Jérôme Glisse recently proposed two extensions that would allow the mapping of those regions into user space and mapping device files between two devices. The resulting discussion surprisingly led to consideration of the future of core kernel structures dealing with memory management.

    Some PCIe devices can perform direct data transfers to other devices without involving the CPU; support for these peer-to-peer transactions was added to the kernel for the 4.20 release. The rationale behind the functionality is that, if the data is passed between two devices without modification, there is no need to involve the CPU, which can perform other tasks instead. The peer-to-peer feature was developed to allow Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) network interface cards to pass data directly to NVMe drives in the NVMe fabrics subsystem. Using peer-to-peer transfers lowers the memory bandwidth needed (it avoids one copy operation in the standard path from device to system memory, then to another device) and CPU usage (the devices set up the DMAs on their own). While not considered directly in the initial work, graphics processing units (GPUs) and RDMA interfaces have been able to use that functionality in out-of-tree modules for years.

    The merged work concentrated on support at the PCIe layer. It included setting up special memory regions and the devices that will export and use those regions. It also allows finding out if the PCIe topology allows the peer-to-peer transfers.

  • Intel Posts Linux Perf Support For Icelake CPUs

    With the core functionality for Intel Icelake CPUs appearing to be in place, Intel's open-source developers have been working on the other areas of hardware enablement for these next-generation processors.

    The latest Icelake Linux patches we are seeing made public by Intel is in regards to the "perf" subsystem support. Perf, of course, is about exposing the hardware performance counters and associated instrumentation that can be exercised by user-space when profiling performance of the hardware and other events.

  • What is after Gemini Lake?

    Based on a 10 nm manufacturing process, the Elkhart Lake SoC uses Tremont microarchitectures (Atom) [2] and features Gen 11 graphics similar to the Ice Lake processors [3]. Intel’s Gen 11 solution offers 64 execution units, and it has managed over 1 TFLOP in GPU performance [4]. This can be compared with the Nvidia GeForce GT 1030 which offered a peak throughput of 0.94 TFLOPs [5]. Code has already been added in the Linux mainline kernel [6] suggesting a possible Computex announcement and mid to late 2019 availability [7].

Linux Foundation: DataPractices, Kodi and Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)

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Linux
OSS
  • Linux Foundation Adds a Project for Building Data Best Practices

    The Linux Foundation today added a new project, called DataPractices.org, which acts as a template for data best practices. The project will offer open coursework for data teamwork in an effort to create a vendor-neutral community to establish these practices and increase data knowledge.

    The project was initially created by data.world, a data catalog platform for data and analysis, as a data practices manifesto. The manifesto contains the values and principles that create an effective, modern, and ethical approach to data teamwork. According to Brett Hurt, data.world co-founder and CEO, the main goal of the project is to “raise the level of data literacy across the ecosystem.”

    Data teamwork, said Hurt, is a method for bringing together “your data practitioners, subject matter experts, and other stakeholders by removing costly barriers to data discovery, comprehension, integration, and sharing.” He added that this method enables companies to “achieve anything with data, faster.”

    Under the Linux Foundation, DataPractices.org will continue and further the work started by data.world’s manifesto. The manifesto is up on the Linux Foundation’s website (and available to sign) and contains a number of values and principles.

  • The Kodi Foundation Officially Joins Forces with The Linux Foundation

    Ever since the first line of its code was written, there was the idea of creating Kodi (known as XBMC back in the day) based on open-source principles. This means that the source code of this application is available for anyone to access, see, review, and edit as they see fit. And now, the Kodi Foundation has joined the Linux Foundation in a not-as-surprising move as these organizations share the same core values.

    In a freshly-published blog post, Kodi’s development team explains the reasons why it has joined the Linux Foundation as an Associate Member. This move will allow Kodi’s team to work with similar organizations, spread their reach, and to improve their own software in the long run. The Linux Foundation has both corporate members and individual supporters, with companies like Google, Microsoft, Huawei, Intel, IBM, Oracle, Samsung, and many others on board.

  • Cloud Native Computing Foundation Announces Kingsoft Cloud as Gold Member

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation® (CNCF®), which sustains open source technologies like Kubernetes® and Prometheus, today announced that Kingsoft Cloud has joined the Foundation as a Gold member.

    Kingsoft Cloud, a unit of Kingsoft Group, is a leading global cloud computing service provider. According to recent research from IDC, Kingsoft is among the top three cloud computing companies in China. The company offers a broad portfolio covering cloud server, physical cloud host, relational database, object storage, load balancing, VPN, CDN, cloud security, cloud DNS, and more, as well as cloud-based solutions for the government and enterprises in vertical industries.

    “By joining CNCF, we look forward to contributing to a more holistic integration of open source technologies across real-world business scenarios,” said Liu Tao,General Manager for Product Center of Cloud Computing and Partner of Kingsoft Cloud. “Becoming a Gold member will not only increase our power to innovate with cutting-edge technologies, but the practical experience Kingsoft Cloud brings can help the CNCF community deploy its projects across commercial application scenarios.”

The Many Flavors of Linux

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GNU
Linux
Security

Linux is not as popularly used in both the security- and user-focused computing worlds as other OSes such as Windows and macOS, but it can still be used for both. In fact, depending on your needs, there are many different flavors of Linux you can use.

And the different versions have key differences between them. Aside from security user-focused distros, there are what can be considered unique Linux distros that have their own specific uses, weird as they may be. This article will detail some of the many flavors of Linux available today and will leave you with a better understanding of their differences, and you will be in a better position to select the distro of Linux for your needs.

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2MP, MIPI-CSI stereo cam runs Linux on Jetson

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Linux
Hardware

E-con’s STEEReoCAM is a 2-megapixel MIPI CSI-2 stereo vision camera designed to work with Jetson TX2 and Xavier modules using a Linux-based TaraXL SDK.

E-con Systems has launched a MIPI CSI-2 connected follow-on to its USB 3.0 linked TaraXL stereo vision camera. Like the TaraXL, the new STEEReoCAM is designed to work with Nvidia’s hexa-core Jetson TX2 compute module and runs the Linux-based, CUDA-accelerated TaraXL SDK. Like its four-camera, CSI-2 driven e-CAM130_CUXVR camera, it also supports the new octa-core Jetson AGX Xavier module.

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Embedded Linux system has five GbE ports for Time Sensitive Networking

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Linux
Hardware

The system’s 82 x 50mm SMARC-sAL28 module runs a Yocto Project based Linux stack (with U-Boot) on the TSN-capable LS1028A, which offers dual 1.3GHz Cortex-A72 cores. The SMARC-sAL28 provides the KBox A-230-LS with 4GB of soldered DDR3L with ECC, as well as 2GB to 64GB eMMC 5.1 storage.

TSN offers guaranteed latency and Quality of Service (QoS) with time synchronization to enable “a timely and highly available delivery of data packets,” says Kontron. TSN Ethernet can replace more expensive, proprietary fieldbus technology while also offering the advantage of being able to “simultaneously communicate seamlessly to the IT level.”

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: C++, Python and In-house OpenJDK Implementation of Alibaba

  • Next C++ workshop: Pointers and Linked Lists, 28 March at 19:00 UTC
    Another workshop is coming up! Improve your C++ skills with the help of LibreOffice developers: we’re running regular workshops which focus on a specific topic, and are accompanied by a real-time IRC meeting. For the next one, the topics are Pointers and Linked Lists. Start by watching this presentation:
  • Python programming language: Pyboard D-series arrives for MicroPython robots
    The new Pyboard D-series micro-controller is now available for purchase at a rather hefty price of £43 ($56), offering developers a low-powered device for running programs created with MicroPython, a stripped-back version of the hugely popular Python 3 programming language.
  • Commenting Python Code
    Programming reflects your way of thinking in order to describe the single steps that you took to solve a problem using a computer. Commenting your code helps explain your thought process, and helps you and others to understand later on the intention of your code. This allows you to more easily find errors, to fix them, to improve the code later on, and to reuse it in other applications as well. Commenting is important to all kinds of projects, no matter whether they are - small, medium, or rather large. It is an essential part of your workflow, and is seen as good practice for developers. Without comments, things can get confusing, real fast. In this article we will explain the various methods of commenting Python supports, and how it can be used to automatically create documentation for your code using the so-called module-level docstrings.
  • Documenting Python Projects With Sphinx and Read The Docs
  • Django Migrations 101
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #361 (March 26, 2019)
  • MongoDB connections
  • Alibaba Dragonwell8 : The In-house OpenJDK Implementation At Alibaba
    Alibaba requires no introduction. It is one of the popular and largest multinational conglomerate founded by Jack Ma, a business magnate and philanthropist from China. It is also world’s fifth-largest internet company by revenue. It specializes in various sectors such as e-commerce, retail, Internet and technology. Alibaba team has provided significant contribution to open source projects. One such project is OpenJDK. The development team at Alibaba has developed many Java-based applications over the years. They have adopted OpenJDK and created their own JDK named “Alibaba Dragonwell8”. It is the downstream version of OpenJDK and completely open source. Alibaba Dragonwell is optimized for developing e-commerce, financial, logistics applications which are running on their 100k+ servers. It is certified as compatible with the Java SE standard. It is currently supports Linux/x86_64 platform only. Let us hope they will extend the support to Unix and other platforms soon. In this guide, we will see how to install Alibaba Dragonwell8 in Linux. I have tested this guide on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS server. However, it should work on other Linux distributions as well.

4MLinux 29.0 BETA released.

4MLinux 29.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages. Read more

Why We Need Our Nonprofits

SPARC was at best a relatively small success. But RISC did succeed, massively, with ARM (which stands for Advanced RISC Machine). ARM started as the Acorn RISC Machine in 1983. Today, most of the world's mobile devices run ARM chips. I don't know how well the CHIPS Alliance will do, but I do know that only an entity big and experienced enough to pull giant competing companies together can do it. For Linux, that's the Linux Foundation. I'm glad we have it. I'm also glad we have the Software Freedom Conservancy. Times are getting tough for FLOSS, and we need all the help we can get. Read more

See GNOME 3.32 on Ubuntu 19.04 Beta

Although the 19.04 is still not officially released this March, but even today we can download the development version and run it (LiveCD) on our computer. We find that it includes the 3.32, the latest version of GNOME desktop environment. I want to highlight some interesting aspects of it on Ubuntu as we saw it on Fedora Rawhide few days ago. I suggest you to download the 19.04 daily-live ISO and quickly test it, I believe you can feel the performance improvements especially how quick it's now to open the start menu and it's now even quicker to search files on Nautilus. Here we go. Happy testing! Read more