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Add-on for Octeon TX based SBCs enables up to 21 WiFi access points

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Linux

Gateworks’ GW16081 mini-PCIe expansion modules can be connected to its Linux-driven Newport GW6400 and GW6300 networking SBCs, enabling up to 21 WiFi APs for multi-radio applications.

When Gateworks launched its Ventana line of i.MX6-based SBCs back in 2013, it also announced a line of mini-PCIe based expansion modules for the boards. The stackable, 140 x 100mm modules include a PoE-ready, quad-GbE GW16083, a 4x mini-PCIe GW16082, and a 7x mini-PCIe GW16081.

As it turned out, the Ventana boards’ i.MX6 SoC imposes limitations on the number of full-bandwidth mini-PCIe connections that can be sustained on the GW16081. In recent years, Gateworks launched a line of Newport SBCs that run Linux on Cavium Octeon TX networking SoCs. The Octeon TX features up to 4x Cortex-A53 like ThunderX cores capable of fully exploiting the GW16081. Gateworks is now promoting the GW16081 for use with the 2x GbE Newport GW6300 and 5x GbE Newport GW6400 SBCs as a platform for multi-radio access point applications.

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Linux-driven compute module offers three flavors of i.MX6 UltraLite

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Linux

Variscite has launched SODIMM-style “VAR-SOM-6UL” module that runs Linux on NXP’s power-efficient i.MX6 UL, ULL, and ULZ SoCs. The WiFi-equipped, -40 to 85°C ready module ships with a new “Concerto” carrier.

Prior to Embedded World in late February, Variscite previewed the VAR-SOM-6UL with incomplete details. The SODIMM-200 form-factor module has now launched starting at $24 in volume along with a VAR-SOM-6UL Development Kit and Starter Kit equipped with a Concerto carrier board. New features announced today include memory and storage details and the availability of 0 to 70°C and -40 to 85°C models.

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Upgrade from Windows 7 to Ubuntu Part 2: Releases

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Knowing Ubuntu releases is important to understand it better. Ubuntu is released twice a year, more precisely, every April and October, hence the number 04 and 10 in every version. It has special release called Long Term Support (LTS) released once in two years, only when the year number is even, hence all LTS version numbers are ended with 04. More importantly, you will also see 3 different periods of Ubuntu Desktop, that have been going through GNOME2, Unity, and GNOME3 eras, with OpenOffice.org and then LibreOffice as the main office suite. You will also see Ubuntu siblings like Kubuntu and Mythbuntu. I hope this will be interesting enough for everybody to read. Go ahead, and learn more about Ubuntu!

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PiVoyager is a UPS for the Raspberry Pi With a Real-Time Calendar Clock

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

The Raspberry Pi is a powerful SBC (Single Board Computer), and aside from being used for everyday computing stuff, the Raspberry Pi can be embedded as the brain of various projects.

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Devices: Commell SBC, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Teensy and Linaro

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Linux
Hardware

AMD and Intel: RdRand and Clear Linux Documentation

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Linux
Hardware
  • AMD Bulldozer/Jaguar CPUs Will No Longer Advertise RdRand Support Under Linux

    Not directly related to the recent AMD Zen 2 BIOS update needed to fix an RdRand problem (though somewhat related in that the original systemd bug report for faulty AMD RdRand stems from these earlier CPUs), but AMD has now decided to no longer advertise RdRand support for Family 15h (Bulldozer) and Family 16h (Jaguar) processors under Linux.

    The RdRand instruction will still work on capable CPUs, but the CPU ID bit is being cleared so that it won't be advertised for software explicitly checking for the support. Tom Lendacky of AMD reesorted to clearing the RDRAND CPU ID bit for 15h/16h processors (no impact for Zen, etc) due to RdRand issues cropping up after suspend/resume. Those issues have affected some users for a while and originate with the original AMD RdRand systemd bug report over problems following that cycle.

  • Clear Linux Project has a new documentation site

    The Clear Linux OS Docs team is happy to announce that our documentation site for the Clear Linux Project has moved to a Sphinx/reST site with the ubiquitous Read-The-Docs theme, consistent with many open source documentation projects.

  • Clear Linux Rolls Out Revamped Documentation

    While Arch Linux remains the gold standard for quality Linux documentation, Intel's Clear Linux has rolled out a new documentation web-site to assist new/existing users in making use of this performance-optimized and security-oriented Linux operating system.

Oracle Is Working To Upstream More Of DTrace To The Linux Kernel & eBPF Implementation

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Linux

While DTrace prospects for the Linux kernel are no longer viewed as magical or groundbreaking as they once were more than a decade ago, Oracle continues to work on its DTrace port to Linux and extending its reach beyond just their "Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel" for their RHEL-cloned Oracle Linux. Oracle now says they are working towards upstreaming more work as well as getting an eBPF-based implementation for the kernel.

On Wednesday, Oracle published a blog post outlining DTrace on Fedora. Getting DTrace working on Fedora isn't trivial: currently it requires building a patched version of the Linux kernel and also building the DTrace user-space utilities. That's how it currently is for most or all Linux distributions besides Oracle Linux with UEK.

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Kernel: AMD Graphics and LWN Articles Outside Paywall

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Linux
  • AMD Renoir Lands In Mesa's RadeonSI - Further Pointing To Vega, Not Navi

    Last week AMD sent out their initial Linux graphics driver support for next-gen Renoir APUs. Those Linux kernel bits will land with AMDGPU in the upcoming Linux 5.4 cycle while the RadeonSI changes were merged today marking that OpenGL support as a new feature for the upcoming Mesa 19.2.

    Renoir leaks up to this point indicated it would be a 7nm APU based on Zen 2 with Navi graphics. The Zen 2 cores still could be accurate, but the graphics driver patches from last week and the RadeonSI OpenGL driver support today all point to it being Vega.

  • An end to implicit fall-throughs in the kernel

    The C switch statement has, since the beginning of the language, required the use of explicit break statements to prevent execution from falling through from one case to the next. This behavior can be a useful feature, allowing for more compact code, but it can also lead to bugs. The effort to rid the kernel of implicit fall-through coding patterns came to a conclusion with the 5.3-rc2 release, where the last cases were fixed. There is a good chance that these fixes will have to be redone in the future, though.

    The problem with C's fall-through behavior is that it is implicit, with no indication of whether the behavior is intended or not. Developers learn (the hard way, sometimes) to end each case with a break statement as a matter of habit, but it's still an easy thing to forget, and the resulting code is seen by the compiler as being entirely valid. A forgotten break almost certainly introduces a bug, even if it might not manifest itself for years. Many developers have had reason to wish that the C language required an explicit indication by the programmer that fall-through behavior is desired.

  • vDSO, 32-bit time, and seccomp

    The seccomp() mechanism is notoriously difficult to use. It also turns out to be easy to break unintentionally, as the development community discovered when a timekeeping change meant to address the year-2038 problem created a regression for seccomp() users in the 5.3 kernel. Work is underway to mitigate the problem for now, but seccomp() users on 32-bit systems are likely to have to change their configurations at some point.

    The virtual dynamic shared object (vDSO) mechanism is an optimization provided by the kernel to reduce the cost of certain frequently used system calls. The vDSO is a small region of kernel-provided memory that is normally mapped into the address space of every user-space process; it contains implementations of system calls that can, in some circumstances at least, do their work in a user-space context. That allows the caller to avoid making a real system call and, thus, to avoid the cost of a context switch into kernel mode. System calls related to timekeeping, such as gettimeofday() are implemented in the vDSO, since they can often run quickly in user space and they tend to be called frequently.

    The vDSO has generally been implemented in an architecture-specific way, even though the functions it performs are mostly the same across architectures. In the 5.2 development cycle, Vincenzo Frascino added a generic vDSO implementation that factored out much of the architecture-specific code into a single implementation that could be used on all architectures. During the 5.3 merge window, the x86 architecture switched over to the generic version, and all was well — or so it seemed.

13MP MIPI-CSI2 cam plugs into Variscite i.MX8M board

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Linux

E-con has launched a 13-megapixel, 4-lane MIPI-CSI2 “e-CAM130_iMX8M” camera designed to work with Variscite’s DART-MX8M eval kit. Future models will support Variscite’s i.MX8M Mini, i.MX8X and i.MX8 QuadMax based boards.

E-con Systems announced a collaboration with embedded board vendor Variscite to provide cameras optimized for its Linux-driven, NXP i.MX8-powered compute modules. For starters, E-con has launched a $199 e-CAM130_iMX8M camera that connects to the evaluation kit for Variscite’s i.MX8M-equipped DART-MX8M module.

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Enthusiasts Plan Open-Source Raspberry Pi Tablet for 2019

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GNU
Linux

CutiePi's website claims the device will offer "a complete Raspberry Pi in a tablet form factor, minus the trouble of connecting monitor or power supply," for people to experiment with. We could see the CutiePi appealing to Raspberry Pi users curious about the platform's potential in new form factors. Its status as a completely open-source project could also attract the attention of people who dislike proprietary hardware.

The device itself currently includes an 8-inch display in a 209 x 124 x 12mm enclosure its creators said can be 3D-printed. Everything is powered by a "custom designed CM3 Lite carrier board" that (as the name suggests) features a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Lite. That product is essentially a Raspberry Pi Model 3 with a BCM2837 processor and 1GB RAM in a different form factor that's supposed to allow it to be used for industrial applications.
Relying on the Compute Model 3 Lite might be a bit of a letdown for Raspberry Pi enthusiasts hoping the CutiePi would offer more power. The Raspberry Pi Foundation released the Compute Model 3 Lite in 2017; the better-performing Compute Model 3+ debuted in January. The newer model, which is based on the Raspberry Pi Model 3B+, includes an improved thermal management system over its predecessor, as well as the BCM2837B0 processor.

CutiePi will also include a custom user interface on top of Raspbian made specifically for touchscreen devices. The tablet's creators said they're hoping to augment built-in apps, including a namesake terminal emulator built on top of Qt, with Raspbian PIXEL apps via XWayland. Projects created for the Raspberry Pi should also be relatively easy to port to CutiePi; that's the entire point of building a tablet on top of the existing pastry-evoking platform.

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More in Tux Machines

Software, HowTos and Storage

  • Pause Music When Locking The Screen And Resume On Unlock For Spotify, Rhythmbox, Others

    When you lock your computer screen (without suspending the system), most desktop audio players continue playback in the background, sometimes not emitting any sound ¹. Due to this you may unintentionally skip parts of podcasts or songs in a playlist, etc. Enter pause-on-lock, a Bash script that pauses your music player when you lock the screen and resumes playback once the screen is unlocked. pause-on-lock works on Unity, GNOME, Cinnamon and MATE desktop environments, and by default it supports Spotify and Rhythmbox. With the help of playerctl (a command line controller for controlling media players that support the MPRIS D-Bus interface), this script can extend its supported music players to many others, including Audacious, VLC, Cmus, and others.

  • Easy Way to Screen Mirroring Android on Ubuntu!

    Screen Mirroring is one of the features found on smartphones, one of which is on Android. This feature serves to display the smartphone to a computer. This is very useful for example when used for demo applications that you make, or maybe for other things related to smartphones. In Ubuntu, we can do screen mirroring with applications available on Android, for example is AirDroid which can be used for screen mirroring through a browser. But I feel less optimal when using this instant method. Because there is a lag between activity on the smartphone and on the monitor screen on the computer, and the results are less than optimal. What might be the cause because it is opened through a browser and uses wi-fi? (Personal question). I am looking for another application for screen mirroring on Ubuntu, and one of the very good applications is Scrcpy. This application can be used for screen mirroring without a root device.

  • Command line quick tips: Searching with grep
  • How to Install Cezerin on Debian 9
  • How to Create a Bootable USB Stick from the Ubuntu Terminal
  • How to Install Git on Debian 10
  • How to Copy/Move a Docker Container to Another Host
  • Six practical use cases for Nmap
  • The Next Stage of Flash Storage: Computational Storage
  • NAS upgrade

    At some point in the future I hope to spend a little bit of time on the software side of things, as some of the features of my set up are no longer working as they should: I can't remote-decrypt the main disk via SSH on boot, and the first run of any backup fails due to some kind of race condition in the systemd unit dependencies. (The first attempt does not correctly mount the backup partition; the second attempt always succeeds).

  • Storage Concepts And Technologies Explained In Detail

Fedora: Dropping i686 and Flock Reports

  • Approved: Fedora 31 To Drop i686 Everything/Modular Repositories

    The month-old proposal for the upcoming Fedora 31 Linux distribution release to stop with their i686 repositories for Everything and Modules was voted on today by the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee. The FESCo group gave their formal approval today for permitting these i686 repositories to be removed beginning with Fedora 31. This also goes in-step with Fedora 31 having already decided to stop with their i686 kernel builds.

  • Living my best 4 days: Flock to Fedora 2019

    Months of waiting came to an end and finally, it was time to meet people with whom I have been working for the last 4 months, being on the other side of the screen. Things seemed different when our last Wednesday conference call ended with “Meet you soon” instead of a “Good Day”. The excitement of attending Flock to Fedora, was not only because the virtual interaction is turning to the real meeting but also, it was my first ever International trip. With approaching the 6th of August, the fear of travelling solo was getting on the peak, and at one moment I started questioning if all the trouble I underwent during last month was even worth it. But the time I met Shraddha(another intern working on the same project)at Bangalore airport, we happened to click so much at our first conversation that it was certain that at least my journey will not be me, and my headphones all the time. Since I reached Budapest a day before when everyone arrived, I got a handful of time discovering places, getting to know their culture and try on things we never tried before. The excitement of being at such a beautiful place did not make me realise that I was sleep-deprived, I had a jet lag of 4 hours and I was hungry. I spent the entire day roaming the streets, enjoying a breath of fresh air and exploring the city and ways of commute as well. Next day we shifted to the hotel that was booked for us and where the conference will be held. The ambience of the whole place was really nice and we met other fellow attendees at the conference.

  • rpminspect Presentation at Flock 2019

    Flock in Budapest was a great event. There were a lot of talks I wanted to attend, but could not make it to all of them. I did give one talk on my project called rpminspect. rpminspect is a project I started as a replacement for an internal Red Hat tool. I am working on integrating it in to the build workflow for Fedora but also allow package maintainers to use it locally as a build linter of sorts. Here is a link to the presentation I gave. I think there is video, but I am not sure where those are.

Security: Patches, IPFire 2.23 Core Update 135, Kaspersky in the Middle

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (kernel and openssl), Debian (ffmpeg, golang-1.11, imagemagick, kde4libs, openldap, and python3.4), Fedora (gradle, hostapd, kdelibs3, and mgetty), Gentoo (adobe-flash, hostapd, mariadb, patch, thunderbird, and vlc), Mageia (elfutils, mariadb, mythtv, postgresql, and redis), openSUSE (chromium, kernel, LibreOffice, and zypper, libzypp and libsolv), Oracle (ghostscript), Red Hat (rh-php71-php), SUSE (bzip2, evince, firefox, glib2, glibc, java-1_8_0-openjdk, polkit, postgresql10, python3, and squid), and Ubuntu (firefox).

  • IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 135 is ready for testing

    after a little break with many things to fight, we are back with a brand new Core Update which is packed with various bug fixes and cleanup of a lot of code.

  • Wladimir Palant: Kaspersky in the Middle - what could possibly go wrong?

    Roughly a decade ago I read an article that asked antivirus vendors to stop intercepting encrypted HTTPS connections, this practice actively hurting security and privacy. As you can certainly imagine, antivirus vendors agreed with the sensible argument and today no reasonable antivirus product would even consider intercepting HTTPS traffic. Just kidding… Of course they kept going, and so two years ago a study was published detailing the security issues introduced by interception of HTTPS connections. Google and Mozilla once again urged antivirus vendors to stop. Surely this time it worked? Of course not. So when I decided to look into Kaspersky Internet Security in December last year, I found it breaking up HTTPS connections so that it would get between the server and your browser in order to “protect” you. Expecting some deeply technical details about HTTPS protocol misimplementations now? Don’t worry, I don’t know enough myself to inspect Kaspersky software on this level. The vulnerabilities I found were far more mundane.

Replicating Particle Collisions at CERN with Kubeflow

This is where Kubeflow comes in. They started by training their 3DGAN on an on-prem OpenStack cluster with 4 GPUs. To verify that they were not introducing overhead by using Kubeflow, they ran training first with native containers, then on Kubernetes, and finally on Kubeflow using the MPI operator. They then moved to an Exoscale cluster with 32 GPUs and ran the same experiments, recording only negligible performance overhead. This was enough to convince them that they had discovered a flexible, versatile means of deploying their models to a wide variety of physical environments. Beyond the portability that they gained from Kubeflow, they were especially pleased with how straightforward it was to run their code. As part of the infrastructure team, Ricardo plugged Sofia’s existing Docker image into Kubeflow’s MPI operator. Ricardo gave Sofia all the credit for building a scalable model, whereas Sofia credited Ricardo for scaling her team’s model. Thanks to components like the MPI operator, Sofia’s team can focus on building better models and Ricardo can empower other physicists to scale their own models. Read more Also: Issue #2019.08.19 – Kubeflow at CERN