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Linux

Can you name these Linux distributions?

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Linux

Linux is turning 25 this year. Since its inception in 1991, what started as a "modest new OS" has ballooned into a juggernaut with 258 distributions.

To celebrate Linix's big birthday, I have gathered together 25 pictorial representations of Linux distributions. Given a visual clue and a very brief description, how many of the Linux distributions represented here can you identify?

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​The best Linux laptop: The 2016 Dell XPS 13

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GNU
Linux

Make no mistake about it. The 2016 Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition laptop is wonderful. It's fast, its display is gorgeous, and, at less than three pounds, you can carry and code with it anywhere. But, oh, that price tag!

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Also: Hands-on with the Linux-ready Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition

Respinning Linux

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Linux

It started back in 2009, the first year of Lynn Bender’s fantastic brainstorm “Linux Against Poverty.” Lynn’s idea and subsequent involvement with our organization, then named The HeliOS Project, would infuse our effort with an energy and inventory we still rely on today.

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Linux Kernel/Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Top 6 Desktop Linux Blunders

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Linux

Ever since I first tried Linux on my desktop years ago, I've found myself wincing at what I felt were avoidable blunders. This observation doesn't affect one distro more than another, rather it's ongoing issues I've watch in utter amazement happen time and time again.

No, I'm not giving a free pass to proprietary operating systems as they also have their share of epic blunder moments. But with Linux on the desktop, I guess you could say it just hits a bit closer to home. Remember, these are not merely bugs – I'm also talking about avoidable issues that affect folks even if they don't realize it.

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A Linux Kernel Wizard’s Adventures in Embedded Hardware

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Linux

Sometimes the best tutorials come not from experts, but from proficient newcomers who are up to date on the latest entry-level technologies and can remember what it’s like to be a newbie. It also helps if, like Grant Likely, the teacher is a major figure in embedded Linux who understands how hardware is ignited by software.

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Intel's SGX tiptoes towards Linux

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Linux

Intel has fulfilled a promise made in April to open-source a Linux driver for its SGX technology.

SGX – Software Guard Extensions – first landed in 2013, and gives programmers lock up code and data inside containers enforced by the CPU. The idea is to create an environment to assure people clouding their enterprise systems that not even admins in the data centre can spy on what's going on.

Back in April, Chipzilla promised an SGX SDK for Linux, and a few weeks ago – with so little fuss we overlooked it – it made good over at GitHub.

The current implementation is very Alpha-looking, with just one distribution anointed to run SGX – Ubuntu 14.04-LTS 64bits. The hardware requirement is a Skylake system configured with SGX enabled.

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Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • Smaller & Faster than Raspberry Pi Zero: Meet NanoPi NEO ARM Linux Development Board

    Raspberry Pi Zero has two noticeable attributes compared to other Raspberry Pi boards: it’s smaller and it’s cheaper. FriendlyARM has now designed another model for their NanoPi family, that about 12% smaller, although not quite as thin at all due to its Ethernet jack and USB connector, and much faster than Raspberry Pi Zero, with NanoPi NEO board powered by Allwinner H3 quad core processor.

  • Notes from the fourth RISC-V workshop

    Many of the lowRISC team (Robert Mullins, Wei Song, and Alex Bradbury) have been in Boston this week for the fourth RISC-V workshop. By any measure, this has been a massive success with over 250 attendees representing 63 companies and 42 Universities. Wei presented our most recent work on integrating trace debug, which you’ll soon be able to read much more about here (it’s worth signing up to our announcement list if you want to be informed of each of our releases).

  • Arduino-powered Lock Automatically Locks The Door When You Open Incognito Mode

    Mike, the CEO of the Useless Duck Company, has created an Arduino-powered door lock which locks the door automatically when you open an incognito window in your web browser. In a YouTube video, Mike shows how this awesome tech works.

Blockchain on GNU/Linux

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GNU
Linux
Server

Solus Linux explained

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OS
Linux

Solus Linux is relatively new to Linux world. It's first release was in 2012. Today latest version of Solus is 1.2.1 which was released on June 2016. So let's take a look at some cool features Solus offers us.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Software 3.22 Will Support Installation of Snaps, Flatpak Repository Files

The GNOME 3.21.4 desktop environment was released last week, which means that many of the default applications and components were updated with bug fixes and various enhancements. Read more

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Now Merged with SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2

The development cycle of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system continues, and today we would like to inform our readers about the availability of the third and last Alpha build in the series. Read more

Linux 4.7 and Linux 4.8

  • Linux Kernel 4.7 Officially Released, Introduces Support for Radeon RX480 GPUs
    Today, July 24, 2016, after a week of holiday fun, Linus Torvalds has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7 for all GNU/Linux operating systems. The Linux 4.7 kernel has been in development for the past two months, but that shouldn't surprise anyone who is either reading our website on a regular basis or keeping pace with the Linux kernel development cycle, which was very normal for this branch. A total of seven Release Candidate (RC) testing builds were released since May 29, 2016, which introduced numerous new features and improvements.
  • The Biggest Features Of The Linux 4.7 Kernel
    If all goes according to plan, the Linux 4.7 kernel will be released before the day is through.
  • The Size Of Different DRM Graphics Drivers In Linux 4.7
    Last October I looked at The Size Of The Different Open-Source Linux DRM/Mesa Graphics Drivers, but with it being nearly one year since then and Linux 4.7 due out today, I decided to run some fresh L.O.C. measurements on the popular DRM/KMS drivers to see their current sizes. This lines-of-code counting was mostly done out of a curiosity factor. In this article I'm just looking at the in-kernel DRM code and not the Mesa drivers, DDX drivers, LLVM back-ends, or anything else in user-space related to the open-source graphics drivers.
  • The Btrfs Windows Driver Updated With RAID Support & Other Features
  • Hardened Usercopy Appears Ready To Be Merged For Linux 4.8
    Yet another Linux kernel security feature coming to the mainline kernel that appears readied for the Linux 4.8 merge window is hardened usercopy. Hardened usercopy was originally based upon GrSecurity's PAX_USERCOPY feature but reworked into a whole new form, according to developer Kees Cook at Google. This hardened usercopy is to be exposed as the CONFIG_HARDENED_USERCOPY option within the kernel.

Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS Fixes the Raspberry Pi Partition Resizer, Adds MATE 1.14

As part of the Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) announcement, Martin Wimpress informs us about the release of the Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS operating systems for users of Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS. Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS is not a major release, and if your Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) installation is up to date, you already have the latest software updates and security patches that have been injected in the new installation mediums generated mainly for those who want to reinstall or deploy the OS on new systems. Read more