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Linux Foundation: CNCF, Linux Foundation Networking Fund (LFN), Open FinTech Forum (OFTF)

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Linux
  • The CNCF takes steps toward serverless computing

    Even though the idea of ‘serverless’ has been around since 2006, it is a relatively new concept. It’s the next step in the ongoing revolution of IT infrastructure that goes back to the days when one server used to run one application.

  • Spirent joins Linux Foundation Networking Fund (LFN) to support new Open Source ecosystem

    Spirent Communications joined the Linux Foundation Networking Fund (LFN), an umbrella group created by The Linux Foundation for its various networking initiatives. Spirent said it's the first test product vendor to support the development of a new Open Source ecosystem for telecom service assurance. Open Networking Automation Platform (ONAP), Open Platform for NFV and OpenDaylight gained widespread endorsement in 2017 from service providers, as de facto industry standards.

  • Linux Foundation launches OFTF event to include blockchain

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit focused on open source innovation, has announced a new event with a cumbersome name: “Open FinTech Forum: AI, Blockchain, Kubernetes & Quantum on Wall Street” (aka OFTF). It will take place on October 10-11, 2018 in New York City.

Raspberry Pi Projects: Things Gateway by Mozilla, Bang and Olufsen and HiFiBerry

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Linux
Hardware

RISC-V Latest

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • First Open-Source RISC-V SoC for Linux Released

    Only months after debuting the Freedom U540, the world's first Linux-compatible processor based on the open-source RISC-V chip architecture, RISC-V chipmaker SiFive has surprised the open-source community again by unveiling a full development board built around the ISA.

    Called the HiFive Unleashed, the new development board is built around SiFive's Freedom U540, which is based on the company's U54-MC Coreplex. The chip is a 64-bit, 4+1 multicore processor that fully supports Linux, as well as other operating systems such as FreeBSD and Unix. The development board itself features a 8GB of DDR4 with ECC, a gigabit ethernet port, 32 MB of quad SPI flash memory, a MicroSD card slot, and an FPGA mezzanine card (FMC) connector for allowing peripherals and other expansion devices to be attached to the board.

  • RISC-V plans to fulfill open-source architecture innovation dreams

    Digital transformation and the proliferation of big data are driving a renaissance in software development, requiring new advancements in hardware and processors. With a range of needs from a variety of users and platforms, standard instruction set architectures are no longer fulfilling all use cases as the demand for flexibility and improved performance increases.

    “The world is dominated by two instruction set architectures. … Both are great, but … they’re owned by their respective companies. RISC-V is a third entrant into this world … it’s completely open source,” said Martin Fink (pictured, right), chief technology officer of Western Digital Corp. Through the RISC-V initiative, Fink and Dave Tang (pictured, left), senior vice president of corporate marketing at Western Digital, are working to provide an instruction set that can be freely shared to encourage innovation.

  • Fedora/RISC-V: Runnable stage 4 disk images

Linux and DRM, Verizon Lockdown

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Linux
  • HDCP Content Protection Support Called For Integration In DRM-Next / Linux 4.17

    In November of last year is when we reported on a Google developer proposing HDCP patches for Intel's DRM Linux driver. In this case, DRM as in the Direct Rendering Manager but HDCP as in the controversial High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection. HDCP is the digital copy protection for DP/DVI/HDMI for preventing HDCP-encrypted content from being played on unauthorized devices.

  • Verizon Begins Locking Down Its Phones Again, Purportedly To 'Stop Theft'

    If you've been around a while, you probably know that Verizon has an adversarial relationship with openness and competition. The company's history is rife with attempts to stifle competing emerging technologies that challenged Verizon's own business interests, from its early attempts to block GPS and tethering apps so users would have to subscribe to inferior and expensive Verizon services, to its attempts to block competing mobile payment services to force users (again) onto Verizon's own, inferior products. And that's before you get to Verizon's attempts to kill net neutrality and keep the broadband industry uncompetitive.

    In the earlier years, Verizon had a horrible tendency to lock down its devices to a crippling and comical degree. But with the rise of net neutrality, competition from carriers like T-Mobile, and open access conditions affixed to certain spectrum purchased by Verizon, the company slowly-but-surely loosened its iron grip on mobile devices. But let's be clear: the company had to be dragged, kicking and screaming, into the new, more open future we all currently enjoy, where (by and large) you can install whatever apps you like on your device, and attach most mainstream devices (with some caveats) to Verizon's network.

    That's why more than a few eyebrows were raised after Verizon gave CNET the early exclusive news (apparently in the hopes that they'd frame it generously, which they did) that the company will soon be locking down its smartphones as part of a purported effort to "combat theft." Carriers have been justly criticized (and sued) for doing too little to prevent theft, in part because they profit on both sides of the equation -- both when a customer comes crying to Verizon to buy a new phone, and when the user with the stolen phone heads to Verizon to re-activate it on a new line.

What is a Linux "oops"?

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Linux

If you check the processes running on your Linux systems, you might be curious about one called "kerneloops". And that’s “kernel oops”, not “kerne loops” just in case you didn’t parse that correctly. Put very bluntly, an “oops” is a deviation from correct behavior on the part of the Linux kernel. Did you do something wrong? Probably not. But something did. And the process that did something wrong has probably at least just been summarily knocked off the CPU. At worst, the kernel may have panicked and abruptly shut the system down.

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FOSS Project Spotlight: LinuxBoot

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Linux

The more things change, the more they stay the same. That may sound cliché, but it's still as true for the firmware that boots your operating system as it was in 2001 when Linux Journal first published Eric Biederman's "About LinuxBIOS". LinuxBoot is the latest incarnation of an idea that has persisted for around two decades now: use Linux as your bootstrap.

On most systems, firmware exists to put the hardware in a state where an operating system can take over. In some cases, the firmware and OS are closely intertwined and may even be the same binary; however, Linux-based systems generally have a firmware component that initializes hardware before loading the Linux kernel itself. This may include initialization of DRAM, storage and networking interfaces, as well as performing security-related functions prior to starting Linux. To provide some perspective, this pre-Linux setup could be done in 100 or so instructions in 1999; now it's more than a billion.

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Linux: CI Testing, seL4, Meltdown and Spectre Mitigations, and More LWN Coverage (Now Outside Paywall)

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Linux
  • Initial Icelake Support Heading To Linux 4.17, Many Bug Fixes Thanks To CI Testing
  • Mixed-criticality support in seL4

    Linux tries to be useful for a wide variety of use cases, but there are some situations where it may not be appropriate; safety-critical deployments with tight timing constraints would be near the top of the list for many people. On the other hand, systems that can run safety-critical code in a provably correct manner tend to be restricted in functionality and often have to be dedicated to a single task. In a linux.conf.au 2018 talk, Gernot Heiser presented work that is being done with the seL4 microkernel system to safely support complex systems in a provably safe manner.

    The world contains an increasing number of "cyberphysical systems" implementing various types of safety-critical functionality. Fly-by-wire systems for aircraft and factory automation systems are a couple of examples. These systems are subject to an expensive safety-assurance process with costs that scale linearly (at least) with each line of code. When one considers that an Airbus A380 jetliner contains around 120 million lines of code, one can understand that developing that code can be a costly business.

  • Meltdown and Spectre mitigations — a February update

    The initial panic over the Meltdown and Spectre processor vulnerabilities has faded, and work on mitigations in the kernel has slowed since our mid-January report. That work has not stopped, though. Fully equipping the kernel to protect systems from these vulnerabilities is a task that may well require years. Read on for an update on the current status of that work.

  • 4.16 Merge window part 1

    As of this writing, just over 6,700 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline repository for the 4.16 development cycle. Given that there are a number of significant trees yet to be pulled, the early indications are that 4.16 will be yet another busy development cycle. What follows is a summary of the significant changes merged in the first half of this merge window.

IPFire 2.19 - Core Update 118 released

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GNU
Linux
Security

this is the official release announcement for IPFire 2.19 – Core Update 118. It comes with a number of security and bug fixes as well as some new features. Please note the that we are dropping support for some add-ons.

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Understanding SELinux labels for container runtimes

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Linux
Server

SELinux provides great filesystem separation for your container runtimes, but you need to be careful when running multiple container runtimes on the same machine at the same time, and also careful to clean up any content left on a host when you remove a container.

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Solus 4 Is Coming Soon with Experimental Wayland Session for GNOME, Linux 4.15

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Linux
GNOME

Solus Project's Joshua Strobl posted today more details about the upcoming Solus 4 desktop operating system and some of the new features that will be integrated. These include a revamped Software Center with the latest Linux Driver Management for better hardware driver support, Hotspot support, Budgie 10.4.1, MATE 1.20, and an experimental Wayland session for the GNOME edition.

"Wayland will not be the default for Solus Budgie or Solus GNOME, however GNOME users will be able to install a separate session package if they wish to test and experiment with Wayland support," says Joshua Strobl. "During my testing, I have not found the quality of the GNOME + Wayland to be sufficient enough to be provided as a default experience for our users."

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Living The Linux Laptop Lifestyle

Another great advantage of open source software: you can run it off of a flash drive before installing it. And I have to admit that I loved Linux Lite's out-of-the-box feel, so much so that I reconsidered installing my number two selection: LXLE, which is designed for underpowered older machines. According to a label on the bottom of my Toughbook, this pre-Linux laptop was decommissioned in 2005, making it well over ten years old. And so I replaced the RAM, installed Linux Lite, and after a short period, I was back to living a Linux laptop lifestyle while waiting for my charger. Read more

Mentor Embedded Linux gains cloud-based IoT platform

Mentor announced a “Mentor Embedded IoT Framework” platform that builds on top of Mentor Embedded Linux with cloud-based IoT cloud services ranging from device authentication and provisioning to monitoring and diagnostics. Mentor’s Mentor Embedded IoT Framework (MEIF) extends its Yocto Project based Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) and Nucleus RTOS development platforms to provide cloud services for IoT device management. The platform mediates between these platforms and cloud service backends, including Amazon Web Services (AWS), Eclipse IoT, Microsoft Azure, and Siemens MindSphere. Read more

Bang & Olufsen’s RPi add-on brings digital life to old speakers

B&O and HiFiBerry have launched an open source, DIY “Beocreate 4” add-on for the Raspberry Pi that turns vintage speakers into digitally amplified, wireless-enabled smart speakers with the help of a 180-Watt 4-channel amplifier, a DSP, and a DAC. Bang & Olufsen has collaborated with HiFiBerry to create the open source, $189 Beocreate 4 channel amplifier kit. The 180 x 140 x 30mm DSP/DAC/amplifier board pairs with your BYO Raspberry Pi 3 with a goal of upcycling vintage passive speakers. Read more

Gemini PDA will ship with Android, but it also supports Debian, Ubuntu, Sailfish, and Postmarket OS (crowdfunding, work in progress)

The makers of the Gemini PDA plan to begin shipping the first units of their handheld computer to their crowdfunding campaign backers any day now. And while the folks at Planet Computer have been calling the Gemini PDA a dual OS device (with Android and Linux support) from the get go, it turns out the first units will actually just ship with Android. Read more