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A Look At The Windows 10 vs. Linux Power Consumption On A Dell XPS 13 Laptop

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Microsoft

With the current-generation Dell XPS 13 XPS9370-7002SLV currently being tested at Phoronix, one of the areas I was most anxious to benchmark was the power consumption... For years it has been a problem of Linux on laptops generally leading to less battery life than on Windows, but in the past ~2+ years there has been some nice improvements within the Linux kernel and a renewed effort by developers at Red Hat and elsewhere on improving the Linux laptop battery life. Here are some initial power consumption numbers for this Dell XPS 13 under Windows 10 and then various Linux distributions.

The Dell XPS 13.3-inch laptop for testing features the Intel Core i7 8550U (quad-core + HT) CPU with UHD Graphics 620, 2 x 4GB RAM, 256GB PM961 NVMe Samsung SSD, and its panel is a 1920 x 1080 resolution. For some initial basic tests I ran Windows 10 out-of-the-box and compared that to fresh installs of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Fedora Workstation 28, openSUSE Tumbleweed, and Clear Linux.

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Xen Project Hypervisor 4.11

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • What’s New in the Xen Project Hypervisor 4.11

    I am pleased to announce the release of the Xen Project Hypervisor 4.11. One of our long-term development goals since the introduction of Xen Project Hypervisor 4.8 has been to create a cleaner architecture for core technology, less code and a smaller computing base for security and performance. The Xen 4.11 release has followed this approach by delivering more PVH related functionality: PVH Dom0 support is now available as experimental feature and support for running unmodified PV guests in a PVH Container has been added. In addition, significant chunks of the ARM port have been rewritten.

  • Xen Project Hypervisor: Virtualization and Power Management are Coalescing into an Energy-Aware Hypervisor

    Power management in the Xen Project Hypervisor historically targets server applications to improve power consumption and heat management in data centers reducing electricity and cooling costs. In the embedded space, the Xen Project Hypervisor faces very different applications, architectures and power-related requirements, which focus on battery life, heat, and size.

    Although the same fundamental principles of power management apply, the power management infrastructure in the Xen Project Hypervisor requires new interfaces, methods, and policies tailored to embedded architectures and applications. This post recaps Xen Project power management, how the requirements change in the embedded space, and how this change may unite the hypervisor and power manager functions.

  • Xen Hypervisor 4.11 Released With Many Core Improvements

    It's one month late but the Xen Project Hypervisor 4.11 release is available today with great scads of new features.

Mobile/Miniature Ubuntu and Tizen

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Infographic: Ubuntu connects everything

    As highlighted in the Ubuntu is Everywhere infographic to coincide with the 16.04 LTS, Ubuntu is used by millions across every sector and technology imaginable. Two years on, and with 18.04 LTS now released, we take a new look at how Ubuntu has evolved and is at the heart of emerging technologies including AI, blockchain, robotics and more. We also share the growth of Ubuntu’s cloud presence and how Ubuntu continues to pervade multiple industries, devices and is used by millions globally.

  • Canonical launches Minimal Ubuntu for automated use at scale

    Canonical wants to optimize Ubuntu for scaled automated usage with the release of Minimal Ubuntu.

    According to the company, Minimal Ubuntu is the smallest base image of Ubuntu, with images less than half the size of the standard Ubuntu server image and a boot time that is 40 percent faster. Even with a small footprint, Canonical explained Minimal Ubuntu still preserves full compatibility with standard Ubuntu operations.

    It is designed for entirely automated operations and does not include the usual user-friendly utilities for interactive usage. The solution removes editors, documentation, locales, and other user-oriented features of Ubuntu Server, leaving only the vital parts of the boot sequence.

  • Canonical Releases Minimal Ubuntu, Mozilla Launches Two Mobile Test Pilot Experiments, Google Announces Jib for Java Developers, New Ubuntu Bug Discovered and Wine 3.12 Now Available

    Canonical released its new Minimal Ubuntu yesterday. According to the Ubuntu blog, Minimal Ubuntu is "optimized for automated use at scale, with a tiny package set and minimal security cross-section. Speed, performance and stability are primary concerns for cloud developers and ops." The images are 50% smaller than the standard Ubuntu server images and they boot up to 40% faster. Minimal Ubuntu also is fully compatible with standard Ubuntu operations. You can download it here.

  • Samsung Gear S4 may run Wear OS, and measure blood pressure

    Next in the pipeline for Samsung is the Galaxy Note 9, scheduled for 9 August in New York. However, it’s not the Note 9 that’s creating more buzz right now, but the company’s upcoming smartwatch, the Gear S4. Rumors about the Gear S4 has been doing the rounds for quite some time, and they don’t seem to fade anytime soon. The big question surrounding it is whether it’ll run on Samsung’s Tizen OS or Google’s Wear OS.

USB Type-C DisplayPort Alternate Mode Driver Coming To Linux 4.19

Filed under
Linux

The USB Type-C DisplayPort Alternate Mode driver will be coming to the Linux 4.19 kernel.

Intel developers have been working on a USB Type-C DisplayPort Alternate Mode support for the mainline Linux kernel so it can play nicely with hardware supporting DP displays/adapters over the USB Type-C interface.

That work is now ready for mainline with USB subsystem maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman pulling the USB Type-C DisplayPort Alternate Mode support into his usb-next Git branch of material that will end up landing in Linux 4.19.

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Linux and Graphics: Gasket, MoltenVK, RADV and Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Google's Gasket Driver Framework Landing For Linux 4.19

    Queued into the staging code for introduction with the Linux 4.19 kernel is the Gasket driver framework and the first driver based upon it, Apex.

    Gasket in this context is short for Google ASIC Software, Kernel Extensions, and Tools. The Gasket framework aims to make it easier to develop thin kernel drivers that provide the basic functionality in kernel-space but any extra functionality is to be achieved in user-space code.

  • MoltenVK Gets Patches To Workaround iOS API Issue, App Store Rejection

    A new pull request has been submitted to MoltenVK, the open-source project for mapping the Vulkan graphics/compute API over Apple's Metal to run on iOS/macOS. This pull request is working to address the issue that caused at least one MoltenVK-using iPhone/iPad game to be rejected from the Apple App Store.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Gets Minor CPU Overhead Reductions, Conditional Rendering Patches

    Samuel Pitoiset of Valve's open-source Linux GPU driver team has been particularly busy in recent days with "RADV" Radeon Vulkan driver enhancements.

    Pitoiset this weekend sent out patches for enabling the new VK_KHR_create_renderpass2 extension, which was introduced in Saturday's release of Vulkan 1.1.80. RenderPass2 allows for render passes to be easily extended.

  • RADV Driver Gets Faster Shader LLVM Compilation

    It's an exciting day in RADV land as in addition to work on the new Vulkan 1.1.80 extensions, David Airlie landed a patch he's been baking for speeding up the shader compilation performance for this open-source Radeon Vulkan driver within Mesa.

Events: Open Source Summit, GUADEC and Debconf

Filed under
Linux
GNOME
Debian
  • Open Collaboration in Practice at Open Source Summit

    A key goal in my career is growing the understanding and best practice of how communities, and open source communities in particular, can work well together. There is a lot of nuance to this work, and the best way to build a corpus of best practice is to bring people together to share ideas and experience.

    In service of this, last year I reached out to The Linux Foundation about putting together an event focused on these "people" elements of Open Source such as community management, collaborative workflow, governance, managing conflict, and more. It was called the Open Community Conference, which took place at the Open Source Summit events in Los Angeles and Prague, and everything went swimmingly.

  • Bastian Ilsø Hougaard: GUADEC 2018 Day 3

    Surprisingly, the castle tour featured an exciting belly dance and a bonus theater show starring GNOME’s legendary actors.

  • Taiwan Travel Blog - Day 1

    I'm going to DebConf18 later this month, and since I had some free time and I speak a somewhat understandable mandarin, I decided to take a full month of vacation in Taiwan.

    I'm not sure if I'll keep blogging about this trip, but so far it's been very interesting and I felt the urge to share the beauty I've seen with the world.

    This was the first proper day I spent in Taiwan. I arrived on the 8th during the afternoon, but the time I had left was all spent traveling to Hualien County (花蓮縣) were I intent to spend the rest of my time before DebConf.

  • Still not going to Debconf....  (100%)

        

    I was looking forward to this year's Debconf in Taiwan, the first in Asia, and the perspective of attending it with no jet lag, but I happen to be moving to Okinawa and changing jobs on August 1st, right at the middle of it...

Watch Desktop Linux Apps (like GIMP) Running on Chrome OS [Video]

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Linux fans enthusiastic about Google’s effort to bring desktop Linux apps on Chrome OS owe to themselves to watch the following video.

In it, technology YouTuber Lon Seidman demos the current state of the Crostini project (‘Crostini’ is the codename for the “run desktop and CLI Linux apps on Chrome OS” feature we keep gushing about) on both an Intel Chromebox and an ARM-based Chromebook.

This latter demo, of ARM support, is of particular interest.

I had (wrongly, it turns out) assumed Google would restrict Crostini to running on its higher-end Chromebooks, like the pricey Google Pixelbook and the ‘spensive Samsung Chromebook Plus.

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Interview with Andrea Buso

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
Interviews

In 2000, my brother, a computer programmer, made me try OpenSuse. I used Gimp, and I felt good because I could draw what I wanted and how I wanted. Since then, I have abandoned Windows for Linux and I have discovered a series of wonderful programs which allow me to work professionally, giving me the advantage of digital.

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How to upgrade to Linux Mint 19

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

I really like Linux Mint, but for most of its life, you couldn't upgrade directly from one version to another. Then, starting with Mint 18.1 in 2016, you could easily upgrade Mint. Now, after the initial release of Linux Mint 19, you can upgrade from the last version, Linux Mint 18.3, to Linux Mint 19.

However, it's not as easy as it was in the 18.x series.

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Snapdragon 820 board gains Linux BSP

Filed under
Linux

VIA has released a Yocto Project based Linux BSP for its previously Android-only SOM-9X20 module, which is sold along with a carrier board for $569. The module features a Snapdragon 820 with 4GB LPDDR4, 64GB eMMC, WiFi, BT, and GPS.

If you skipped over last October’s announcement of the “edge AI” focused SOM-9X20 module due to its lack of Linux support, you may want to give it another chance. VIA Technologies announced a Linux board support package (BSP) based on Yocto Project 2.0.3 for the module and has boosted its Android support to 8.0. VIA also announced a $569 price for the evaluation kit package, which combines the Snapdragon 820 based module with its SOMDB2 Carrier Board.

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Debian: Google Summer of Code, Debian 9.5, and Tails

  • Google Summer of Code with a Debian Project
    Yes! My project proposal was selected. First of all I want to mention that I began my open source adventure with Debian. I started to participate in the open source events like Hackathons, BSP and Conferences and doing small contribution to different projects and this is how everything started.
  • Debian 9.5 Released: “Rock Solid” GNU/Linux Distro Arrives With Spectre v2 Fix
    Following the fourth point release of Debian 9 “stretch” in March, the developers of the popular GNU/Linux distro have shipped the latest update to its stable distribution. For those who don’t know, Debian 9 is an LTS version that’ll remain supported for 5 years. As one would expect, this point release doesn’t bring any set of new features and keeps focusing on improving an already stable experience by delivering security patches and bug fixes. In case you’re looking for an option that brings new features, you can check out the recently released Linux Mint 19.
  • Your Help Is Needed to Test VeraCrypt Support in the Tails Anonymous OS, GNOME
    The team behind the famous Tails operating system, also known as the Amnesic Incognito Live System or simply Anonymous OS, needs your help to test the integration of the VeraCrypt disk encryption software. In an attempt to provide Tails users with better security, the team is working hard these days on the integration of the VeraCrypt open-source and free disk encryption utility used for on-the-fly encryption of encrypted disk drives into the next-generation Tails OS as well as the GNOME desktop environment it uses by default. This will let Tails users easily unlock encrypted volumes on-the-fly when using the anonymous live system to stay hidden online while protecting their identity and privacy. To makes things even easier, they created the VeraCrypt Mounter utility for unlocking VeraCrypt encrypted drives.

Programming: Perl, RcppClassic, Git-cinnabar, Effective Python

  • Confessions of a recovering Perl hacker
    My name's MikeCamel, and I'm a Perl hacker. There, I've said it. That's the first step. My handle on IRC, Twitter and pretty much everywhere else in the world is "MikeCamel." This is because, back in the day, when there were no chat apps—no apps at all, in fact—I was in a technical "chatroom" and the name "Mike" had been taken. I looked around, and the first thing I noticed on my desk was the Camel Book, the O'Reilly Perl Bible. I have the second edition now, but this was the first edition. Yesterday, I happened to pick up the second edition, the really thick one, to show someone on a video conference call, and it had a thin layer of dust on it. I was a little bit ashamed, but a little bit relieved as well.
  • RcppClassic 0.9.11
    A new maintenance release, now at version 0.9.11, of the RcppClassic package arrived earlier today on CRAN. This package provides a maintained version of the otherwise deprecated initial Rcpp API which no new projects should use as the normal Rcpp API is so much better.
  • Mike Hommey: Announcing git-cinnabar 0.5.0 beta 4
    Git-cinnabar is a git remote helper to interact with mercurial repositories. It allows to clone, pull and push from/to mercurial remote repositories, using git.
  • Russ Allbery: Review: Effective Python