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Linux

Linux' use creeping up on Windows

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

"Linux is a free operating system for computers that has been developed largely by volunteer programmers.

Linux is thriving, not just on the college campuses where it emerged, but in companies and institutions. Surveys show that Linux is used by 24 percent of computer servers. It is creeping up on Windows, which has 55 percent of that class of operating system software."

Red Hat signs open-source deal with Bell

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Linux

"Linux vendor Red Hat has signed a master distribution deal with Bell Microproducts Europe in an attempt to develop a broader market for its open-source software."

The Debian Delay: Is Sarge MIA?

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Linux

"The latest release of Debian Linux, code named "Sarge" was supposed to report for duty at the end of last year. That didn't happen. Why has Sarge been delayed and ultimately does it matter? Debian developers and Debian's founding father talked to LinuxPlanet about Sarge's delay and its ultimate deployment."

amoroK LiveCD

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Linux

"there's a party in the CD"

"amaroK Live is a stripped down LiveCD (based on PCLinuxOS) with a fully functional amaroK music player bundled with the tracks commissioned last year by Wired Magazine, which are distributed under the Creative Commons Sampling Licenses. It includes - among other major artists - tracks by the Beastie Boys and David Byrne."

Showing the Newbie's Side in Linux

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Linux

When I first started reading the article "Current Problems with Linux" I expected something of a Linux bashing. However as I read thru it, I kinda remembering feeling the way he describes five years ago when I first started using Linux. It took me about 3 or 4 tries to finally get away from windows due to some of the issues Aditya Nag discusses. I don't entirely agree with all his assessments, but some merit further thought.

O'Reilly Releases "Linux in a Windows World"

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Linux

"Before the Linux operating system can achieve world domination, there are a few lesser challenges it will need to face, the chief among which is the huge installed base of Microsoft Windows users. Practically speaking, the overall success of Linux will not be in its eradication of Windows, but in its ability to coexist with it and other systems. "Indeed, the challenge of coexisting with Windows can be viewed as an opportunity," says Roderick W. Smith, author of "Linux in a Windows World" (O'Reilly, US $44.95). "Linux can be integrated into a Windows network, providing a reliable and low-cost platform on which to run vital services for Windows systems, or even serving as a workstation on an otherwise Windows-dominated network.""

The Business Case for Linux

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Linux

ComputerWorld is running this really interesting article written by Carol Sliwa focusing on high volume businesses and their contemplation of running Linux servers. "Now that Linux is more commonly viewed as a mainstream option for mission-critical functions, IT managers are increasingly evaluating the open-source operating system with the same due diligence with which they compare commercial offerings."

Review: SimplyMEPIS 3.3 Linux

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Linux
Reviews

Randi submits, "XtremeResources is pleased to announce the publication of a review of the SimplyMepis 3.3 Linux Distribution by our very own Steve "sjohnson" Johnson."

This is a really nice review of Mepis starting out with a little background on Warren Woodford. The review includes some

Linux Starts to Take a More Central IT Role

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Linux

"IT managers who once used Linux chiefly to support Web and file- and-print servers said at last week's LinuxWorld Conference & Expo here that they're now running key applications and databases on Linux-based systems - a sign that the open-source software is penetrating deeper into corporate enterprises."

Mandrakesoft and Conectiva Merger

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Linux

"Mandrakesoft today announced a definitive agreement to acquire Conectiva, the number one Linux company in Brazil and Latin America. This acquisition is expected to increase significantly Mandrakesoft's size and R&D capabilities."

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Software: Grafana, Heaptrack, Vim

  • Grafana – An Open Source Software for Analytics and Monitoring
    Grafana is an open source, feature rich, powerful, elegant and highly-extensible analytics and monitoring software that runs on Linux, Windows and MacOS. It is a de facto software for data analytics, being used at Stack Overflow, eBay, PayPal, Uber and Digital Ocean – just to mention but a few. It supports 30+ open source as well as commercial databases/data sources including MySQL, PostgreSQL, Graphite, Elasticsearch, OpenTSDB, Prometheus and InfluxDB. It allows you to dig deeply into large volumes of real-time, operational data; visualize, query, set alerts and get insights from your metrics from differen
  • Heaptrack v1.1.0 release
    Better memory profiling on Linux After more than a year of work, I’m pleased to release another version of heaptrack, the Linux memory profiler! The new version 1.1.0 comes with some new features, significant performance improvements and – most importantly – much improved stability and correctness. If you have tried version v1.0 in the past and encountered problems, update to the new v1.1 and try again!
  • Ten Years of Vim
     

    The philosophy behind Vim takes a while to sink in: While other editors focus on writing as the central part of working with text, Vim thinks it's editing.

     

    You see, most of the time I don't spend writing new text; instead, I edit existing text.

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GNU/Linux: Parrot 4.0, Oregan, Containers and Linux 4.18 Plans

  • Parrot 4.0 is out
    Parrot 4.0 has been released. Parrot is a security-oriented distribution aimed at penetration tests and digital forensics analysis, with additional tools to preserve privacy.
  • Parrot 4.0 release notes
  • Oregan launches SparQ middleware for Linux and Android TV
    Oregan said that the open standards-based offering resolves the differences between the current security and performance requirements of modern-day TV services and the hardware capabilities of STBs that were deployed up to a decade ago.
  • Linux app support coming to older Chrome OS devices
    Linux apps on Chrome OS is one of the biggest developments for the OS since Android apps. Previous reports stated Chromebooks with certain kernel versions would be left in the dust, but the Chrome OS developers have older devices on the roadmap, too. When Google first broke silence on Linux app functionality, it was understood that Linux kernel 4.4 was required to run apps due to dependencies on newer kernel modules. Thanks to an issue found on Chromium’s public bugtracker, we have confirmation that containers won’t be limited to the handful of Chrome OS devices released with kernel 4.4.
  • Looking Ahead To The Linux 4.18 Kernel
    There still are several weeks to go until the Linux 4.17 kernel will be officially released and for that to initiate the Linux 4.18 merge window, but we already know some of the features coming to this next kernel cycle as well as an idea for some other work that may potentially land.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers