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Mainline Linux Kernel Almost Ready For Finally Supporting Unprivileged FUSE Mounts

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Linux

While the Linux 4.17 merge window officially closed yesterday with the release of Linux 4.17-rc1, FUSE maintainer Miklos Szeredi is now trying to get his changes added.

With FUSE (File-Systems in User-Space) updates being uncommon these days, Miklos forgot about sending them into the Linux 4.17 merge window but today is trying to get them added.

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Clonezilla Live Disk Cloning OS Gets New Massive Deployment BitTorrent Mechanism

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GNU
Linux

The open source and freely distributed Clonezilla Live disk cloning and imaging live system recently received a new stable release that adds several new features, enhancements, and other changes.

Clonezilla Live 2.5.5-38 is now the latest stable release of the live system based on the open-source partition and disk imaging and cloning Clonezilla software. It's synced with the software repositories of the Debian Sid operating system series and uses a recent kernel from the Linux 4.15 branch.

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Linux Foundation LFCS: James Medeiros

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Linux
Interviews

I spent my formative years glued to the CRT screen of my 486. In 1997 I was 12 years old and had discovered the local, text-only FreeNet -- my portal to the world's collective knowledge via 2400 baud modem. I quickly became familiar with the Lynx browser and eventually found the Schoolnet MOO (an object-oriented MUD which is still running today) where I made fast friends and began to explore basic coding in the environment. In high school, I was fortunate enough to have a fabulous teacher who gave us free time to experiment with installing our choice of operating systems on machines with swappable hard drives. My first Linux distribution was Mandriva (Mandrake at the time), but I've only recently made the switch to Linux as my primary OS.

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Linux and the beauty of browser-based games

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Linux
Gaming

Judged across all platforms and architectures, Linux is the most popular operating system on the planet, surpassing even Microsoft Windows. But one aspect of computing that the open source operating has trailed the Windows operating system is desktop gaming, where Linux only occupies a small percentage of the (desktop) market. As a result many of the most popular Windows desktop games are not available on Linux. So Windows users contemplating switching to Linux must first answer this question: Is my favorite Windows desktop game available on Linux?

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Tiny, rugged IoT gateways offer 10-year Linux support

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Linux

Moxa announced a line of rugged, compact “UC 2100” IoT gateways that run 10-year available Moxa Industrial Linux and optional ThingsPro Gateway middleware on a Cortex-A8 SoC.

Moxa announced the UC-2100 Series industrial IoT gateways along with its new UC 3100 and UC 5100 Series, but it offered details only on the UC-2100. All three series will offer ruggedization features, compact footprints, and on some models, 4G LTE support. They all run Moxa Industrial Linux and optional ThingsPro Gateway data acquisition software on Arm-based SoCs.

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10 Best Media Server Software for Linux in 2018

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GNU
Linux
Movies

A media server is simply a specialized file server or computer system for storing media (digital videos/movies, audio/music, and images) which can be accessed over a network.

In order to setup a media server, you need computer hardware (or perhaps a cloud server) as well as a software that enables you to organize your media files, and makes it easier to stream and/or share them with friends and family.

In this article, we will share with you a list of 10 best media server software for Linux systems. By the time you complete this article, you will be able to choose the most appropriate software to setup your home/office/cloud media server powered by a Linux system.

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Also: 5 Reasons Kodi Users Should Just Switch To Plex Already

Linux 4.17 RC 1

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Linux
  • Kernel prepatch 4.17-rc1

    Linus has released 4.17-rc1 and closed the merge window for this release.

  • Linux 4.17-rc1
  • Linux 4.17-rc1

    So two weeks have passed, and the merge window was pretty normal and
    is now closed.

    This does not seem to be shaping up to be a particularly big release,
    and there seems to be nothing particularly special about it. The most
    special thing that happened is purely numerology: we've passed the six
    million git objects mark, and that is reason enough to call the next
    kernel 5.0. Except I probably won't, because I don't want to be too
    predictable. The version numbers are meaningless, which should mean
    that they don't even follow silly numerological rules - even if v3.0
    and v4.0 happened to be at the 2M and 4M mark respectively.

    But v5.0 will happen some day. And it should be meaningless. You have
    been warned.

    Anyway, we do have a *few* other things that happened, like Arnd
    getting rid of a number of architectures that seem to simply not
    matter any more. If it turns out that somebody wants to resurrect any
    of them, the code is all there in the git history, but you'll have to
    do the work and show that you'll maintain it and have a few users.

    And just to not make it *all* about removing old architectures,
    there's a new one in there too.

    The architectures that are gone are blackfin, cris, frv, m32r, metag,
    mn10300, score, and tile. And the new architecture is the nds32
    (Andes Technology 32-0bit RISC architecture).

    We actually have a fair amount of other removal and cleanups too. I
    was somewhat pleasantly surprised by the number of pull requests that
    actually ended up removing a lot of lines. Some of it was staging
    drivers that finally gave up the ghost (like irda), but we also got
    rid of some copyright language boiler-plate in favor of just the spdx
    lines. And some pre-shipped lexer/parser files are no more, we're
    better off just generating them.

    End result: we actually removed more lines than we added:

    13538 files changed, 627723 insertions(+), 818855 deletions(-)

    which is probably a first. Ever. In the history of the universe. Or at
    least kernel releases.

    I'd call it momentous, but I think the arch removal was most of it,
    and I'm sure people will quickly rectify that momentary glitch of
    actually shrinking the kernel source code.

    Go out and test,

    Linus

  • Linux 4.17-rc1 Kernel Released: A Ton Of New Functionality While Shedding Old Code

    Just like clockwork the Linux 4.17-rc1 kernel was released tonight following the two week long merge window.

    See the Linux 4.17 features article published this morning to learn all about what's new in this kernel release. There is a ton of work from prominent AMD and Intel graphics driver updates to new hardware support and much more. As covered just a short time ago, Linux 4.17 power measurements are looking surprisingly good for lowering the power use while idling and also the power efficiency under load.

    More Linux 4.17 kernel benchmarks are on the way.

  • Linux 4.17 Offers Some Promising Power-Savings Improvements

    Of the many improvements to be found in the in-development Linux 4.17 kernel -- nicely summarized in our Linux 4.17 feature overview -- one of the features I've been anxious the most to begin benchmarking has been the reported power management improvements. Here are my initial power/performance tests of Linux 4.17 that for some systems is seeing a measurable drop in power usage, even in some cases under load while without sacrificing the performance.

  • The Many Great Features & Changes Coming For The Linux 4.17 Kernel

    Linus Torvalds is expected by the end of the day to release Linux 4.17-rc1, thereby marking the end of the two-week merge window that saw a lot of changes and new features land for Linux 4.17. Here is our original feature overview of the changes to be found in this next major release of the Linux kernel, which should premiere as stable by the middle of June.

    While many of you have likely not even upgraded yet to the feature-packed Linux 4.16, there is a lot more coming to look forward to with the Linux 4.17 kernel this summer. There are many Intel/AMD graphics driver improvements, support for obsolete CPU architectures being dropped, some new CPU support added including initial bits for the NVIDIA Xavier SoC, a potentially very big improvement for dropping Linux idle power usage, various file-system improvements, new hardware support, and even improvements for the Macintosh PowerBook 100 series from more than 20 years ago.

Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.60 Mate Edition released

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GNU
Linux

Today we are very happy to announce the release of Black Lab Enterprise Linux Mate released. Our Mate desktop is based on Ubuntu MATE 16.04.3 with a lot of other enhancements and fixes.. Black Lab Mate is available for download today and you can get it from our ibiblio download servers.

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LibreELEC (Krypton) 8.2.5 MR

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GNU
Linux
Movies

LibreELEC (Krypton) 8.2.5 is now available with updates to Raspberry Pi firmware to address issues seen with the initial firmware release supporting the new 3B+ hardware (which also affected the Slice box). We also bump both nVidia drivers in the Generic x86_64 image, resolve an MCE remote problem, add support for the WeTek Pro remote control unit in WeTek images, the Allo DigiOne DAC in Raspberry Pi images, and updated u-boot in the Odroid C2 image now supports mild overclocking to boost performance.

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Release of Linux 4.9.94, 4.4.128, and 3.18.105; Linux 4.17-rc1 Coming Soon

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Linux
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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Software: Grafana, Heaptrack, Vim

  • Grafana – An Open Source Software for Analytics and Monitoring
    Grafana is an open source, feature rich, powerful, elegant and highly-extensible analytics and monitoring software that runs on Linux, Windows and MacOS. It is a de facto software for data analytics, being used at Stack Overflow, eBay, PayPal, Uber and Digital Ocean – just to mention but a few. It supports 30+ open source as well as commercial databases/data sources including MySQL, PostgreSQL, Graphite, Elasticsearch, OpenTSDB, Prometheus and InfluxDB. It allows you to dig deeply into large volumes of real-time, operational data; visualize, query, set alerts and get insights from your metrics from differen
  • Heaptrack v1.1.0 release
    Better memory profiling on Linux After more than a year of work, I’m pleased to release another version of heaptrack, the Linux memory profiler! The new version 1.1.0 comes with some new features, significant performance improvements and – most importantly – much improved stability and correctness. If you have tried version v1.0 in the past and encountered problems, update to the new v1.1 and try again!
  • Ten Years of Vim
     

    The philosophy behind Vim takes a while to sink in: While other editors focus on writing as the central part of working with text, Vim thinks it's editing.

     

    You see, most of the time I don't spend writing new text; instead, I edit existing text.

  •  

GNU/Linux: Parrot 4.0, Oregan, Containers and Linux 4.18 Plans

  • Parrot 4.0 is out
    Parrot 4.0 has been released. Parrot is a security-oriented distribution aimed at penetration tests and digital forensics analysis, with additional tools to preserve privacy.
  • Parrot 4.0 release notes
  • Oregan launches SparQ middleware for Linux and Android TV
    Oregan said that the open standards-based offering resolves the differences between the current security and performance requirements of modern-day TV services and the hardware capabilities of STBs that were deployed up to a decade ago.
  • Linux app support coming to older Chrome OS devices
    Linux apps on Chrome OS is one of the biggest developments for the OS since Android apps. Previous reports stated Chromebooks with certain kernel versions would be left in the dust, but the Chrome OS developers have older devices on the roadmap, too. When Google first broke silence on Linux app functionality, it was understood that Linux kernel 4.4 was required to run apps due to dependencies on newer kernel modules. Thanks to an issue found on Chromium’s public bugtracker, we have confirmation that containers won’t be limited to the handful of Chrome OS devices released with kernel 4.4.
  • Looking Ahead To The Linux 4.18 Kernel
    There still are several weeks to go until the Linux 4.17 kernel will be officially released and for that to initiate the Linux 4.18 merge window, but we already know some of the features coming to this next kernel cycle as well as an idea for some other work that may potentially land.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers