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Chasing Linux Kernel Archives

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Linux

Kernel development is truly impossible to keep track of. The main mailing list alone is vast beyond belief. Then there are all the side lists and IRC channels, not to mention all the corporate mailing lists dedicated to kernel development that never see the light of day. In some ways, kernel development has become fundamentally mysterious.

Once in a while, some lunatic decides to try to reach back into the past and study as much of the corpus of kernel discussion as he or she can find. One such person is Joey Pabalinas, who recently wanted to gather everything together in Maildir format, so he could do searches, calculate statistics, generate pseudo-hacker AI bots and whatnot.

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Mageia Linux Is a Modern Throwback to the Underdog Days

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Linux

I’ve been using Linux long enough to remember Linux Mandrake. I recall, at one of my first-ever Linux conventions, hanging out with the MandrakeSoft crew and being starstruck to think that they were creating a Linux distribution that was sure to bring about world domination for the open source platform.

Well, that didn’t happen. In fact, Linux Mandrake didn’t even stand the test of time. It was renamed Mandriva and rebranded. Mandriva retained popularity but eventually came to a halt in 2011. The company disbanded, sending all those star developers to other projects. Of course, rising from the ashes of Mandrake Linux came the likes of OpenMandriva, as well as another distribution called Mageia Linux.

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i.MX8M Mini SBC is loaded with options

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Android
Linux

Seco unveiled a highly customizable, Linux-friendly “SBC-C61” with a quad -A53, up to 1.8GHz i.MX8M Mini, up to 4GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC, and optional LAN, WiFi/BT, cellular, serial, and CAN interfaces.

Italy-based Seco calls its SBC-C61 single board computer the “crown jewel” of its multi-board Embedded World product launch. Considering that its 2019 lineup includes the world’s first i.MX8 QuadMax SBC — the SBC-C43 — the company must highly prize the i.MX8M Mini, which is NXP’s newest i.MX8 family SoC, not counting the upcoming i.MX8M Nano. Seco praises the quad -A53 Mini for its Heterogeneous Multi-core Processing Architecture.

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Getting started with PiFlash: Booting your Raspberry Pi on Linux

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Linux
HowTos

Most people install some form of Linux when they set up a Raspberry Pi computer. Until recently, the installation tools for creating a bootable SD card were only available for Windows and MacOS desktops. If you were running Linux on your desktop, you got a page of instructions on doing it manually from the command line.

That works. But if you experiment with multiple Raspberry Pi boards, over time this gets tedious. As an engineer and a coder, I started thinking about automating it to make it easier and, in the usual way open source projects get started, I came away with PiFlash.

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ZRAM Will See Greater Performance On Linux 5.1 - It Changed Its Default Compressor

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Linux

For those relying upon ZRAM to provide a compressed block device in RAM for cases like using it for SWAP or /tmp, with Linux 5.1 you might find it performing better than earlier kernels.

With Linux 5.1, the ZRAM block driver has changed its default compressor from "lzo" to "lzo-rle."

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Also: libinput and location-based touch arbitration

Linux: It was just a matter of time.....

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Linux

Now to their credit, Xtra-PC makes it clear from the beginning that the operating system they will soon cherish as their broken-a**ed computer's savior is Linux. It doesn't go into a lot of detail about Linux but I suppose they know as much as I... don't confuse the new customer. Give them just enough reason to purchase your product and let the details become available upon use.

And by golly, slick marketing that it is, I am sure that they will do well with Xtra-PC. They are pouring copious amounts of money into the promotion of their product, and in this age of computer paranoia, they're probably right on time.

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First i.MX8 QuadMax SBC breaks cover

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Android
Linux

Seco announced a 3.5-inch “SBC-C43” that runs Linux or Android on an up to hexa-core i.MX8 with up to 8GB soldered DDR4 and 32GB eMMC plus WiFi/BT, 2x GbE, 3x USB, HDMI 2.0 in and out, 2x M.2, and -40 to 85°C support.

We’ve seen about a half dozen compute modules based on the high-end, Cortex-A72 enabled i.MX8, mostly recently including Variscite’s VAR-SOM-MX8 and SPEAR-MX8. Seco’s 3.5-inch SBC-C43, however, is the first SBC we’ve encountered. The 3.5-inch SBC offers soldered memories and optional industrial temperature support. It’s designed for biomedical and medical devices, digital signage and infotainment, edge computing, industrial automation, IoT, smart vision, and vending.

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Also: Industrial i.MX8X module runs Linux

Leftovers: Chrome OS 73, Kodlix With GNU/Linux, Aral Introducing Indie Web Server, Sublime Text 3.2

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GNU
Linux
  • Chrome OS 73 brings Linux app support, managed guest sessions to enterprises

    The Stable channel of Chrome OS 73 is nearly here for consumer Chromebooks and there are some key business features for those that use Chrome devices for business in this release. Some functions are a “catch up” to what consumers can already do on a Chromebook, while others are new and specific to enterprises.

  • Kodlix GN41 Gemini Lake mini PC is available with Windows or Linux

    The Kodlix GN41 is a small, fanless desktop computer with an Intel Celeron N4100 quad-core Gemini Lake processor, 8GB of RAM, and 64GB of eMMC storage.

    It’s not particularly remarkable from a hardware standpoint — there’s no shortage of cheap mini PCs on the market these days. But what makes the Kodlix GN41 a bit unusual is the software: it’s available with a choice of Windows 10 or Ubuntu Linux.

  • Introducing Indie Web Server (video)
  • Sublime Text 3.2

    The past year has been busy here at Sublime HQ. We've grown our engineering team, shipped Sublime Text 3.1 and released our second product, Sublime Merge. If you use Git and like the ethos of Sublime Text, we think you'll love it.

    Today we're pushing out Sublime Text 3.2, which builds off of a bunch of work we've done in Sublime Merge. This includes: first-class Git integration, incremental diffing, new theme functionality and block caret support. Beyond that is a slew of other enhancements, stability improvements and performance gains. See the full changelog below for details.

  • Sublime Text 3.2 Released! How to Install it in Ubuntu 18.04

    Sublime Text 3.2 was released yesterday with first-class Git integration, GTK3 port, and many other new features.

  • Thank you, Denelle Dixon

    I want to take this opportunity to thank Denelle Dixon for her partnership, leadership and significant contributions to Mozilla over the last six years.

    Denelle joined Mozilla Corporation in September 2012 as an Associate General Counsel and rose through the ranks to lead our global business and operations as our Chief Operating Officer. Next month, after an incredible tour of duty at Mozilla, she will step down as a full-time Mozillian to join the Stellar Development Foundation as their Executive Director and CEO.

Linux Foundation: More Microsoft 'Campaign Contributions', Continuous Delivery Foundation (CD Foundation or CDF)

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Linux
  • Linux Foundation announces CommunityBridge platform for open source developers [Ed: Notice how Microsoft is once again passing a bribe to "Linux Foundation"]

    Following up on those announcements, Microsoft-owned GitHub said it would donate $100,000 to CommunityBridge and invited maintainers of CommunityBridge projects to take part in GitHub's maintainer program.

    “We greatly appreciate GitHub’s donation and support of CommunityBridge and are happy to match it—all in the name of the maintainers we both aim to serve,” said Zemlin, in a prepared statement. “We invite other organizations to engage in our grant program, and help us solve critical challenges to better support long-term sustainability for open source projects.”

  • Linux Foundation offers devs and project maintainers help with money, mentoring and security

    CommunityBridge People is supposed to enable “easy connections of mentors and prospective mentees interested in getting involved in projects and advancing diversity”.

    The Linux Foundation has also launched a Diversity Stipends Matching program, which will offer $3,000 matching stipends to the first 100 diverse mentees engaged by projects through the CommunityBridge platform.

  • CloudBees Works with Jenkins and Jenkins X Projects, Linux Foundation, Google to Launch Continuous Delivery Foundation

    CloudBees, the enterprise DevOps leader powering the continuous economy, announced the launch of the Continuous Delivery Foundation (CD Foundation or CDF), a new foundation that will operate under the umbrella of the Linux Foundation. CloudBees led the launch initiative, in collaboration with the Jenkins and Jenkins X communities, Google and the Linux Foundation itself.

F2FS Continues Getting More Fixes As It Rolls Out To More Devices

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Linux

The Flash-Friendly File-System (F2FS) continues being supported by more Android-powered mobile devices and with this uptick in user activity is resulting in more fixes and low-level improvements to the file-system.

With the previous Linux 5.0 cycle (nee 4.21) there were a number of fixes thanks to F2FS appearing on Google's Pixel. This flash-optimized Linux file-system is appearing on more Android devices and with that more device engineers testing it out as well as evaluating the code.

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Forbes Says The Raspberry Pi Is Big Business

Not that it’s something the average Hackaday reader is unaware of, but the Raspberry Pi is a rather popular device. While we don’t have hard numbers to back it up (extra credit for anyone who wishes to crunch the numbers), it certainly seems a day doesn’t go by that there isn’t a Raspberry Pi story on the front page. But given that a small, cheap, relatively powerful, Linux computer was something the hacking community had dreamed of for years, it’s hardly surprising. [...] So where has the Pi been seen punching a clock? At Sony, for a start. The consumer electronics giant has been installing Pis in several of their factories to monitor various pieces of equipment. They record everything from temperature to vibration and send that to a centralized server using an in-house developed protocol. Some of the Pis are even equipped with cameras which feed into computer vision systems to keep an eye out for anything unusual. [Parmy] also describes how the Raspberry Pi is being used in Africa to monitor the level of trash inside of garbage bins and automatically dispatch a truck to come pick it up for collection. In Europe, they’re being used to monitor the health of fueling stations for hydrogen powered vehicles. All over the world, businesses are realizing they can build their own monitoring systems for as little as 1/10th the cost of turn-key systems; with managers occasionally paying for the diminutive Linux computers out of their own pocket. Read more

Graphics: NVIDIA, Nouveau and Vulkan

  • NVIDIA 418.49.04 Linux Driver Brings Host Query Reset & YCbCr Image Arrays
    NVIDIA has issued new Vulkan beta drivers leading up to the Game Developers Conference 2019 as well as this next week there being NVIDIA's GPU Technology Conference (GTC) nearby in California. The only publicly mentioned changes to this weekend's NVIDIA 418.49.04 Linux driver update (and 419.62 on the Windows side) is support for the VK_EXT_host_query_reset and VK_EXT_ycbcr_image_arrays extensions.
  • Nouveau NIR Support Lands In Mesa 19.1 Git
    It shouldn't come as any surprise, but landing today in Mesa 19.1 Git is the initial support for the Nouveau Gallium3D code to make use of the NIR intermediate representation as an alternative to Gallium's TGSI. The Nouveau NIR support is part of the lengthy effort by Red Hat developers on supporting this IR as part of their SPIR-V and compute upbringing. The NIR support is also a stepping stone towards a potential NVIDIA Vulkan driver in the future.
  • Vulkan 1.1.104 Brings Native HDR, Exclusive Fullscreen Extensions
    With the annual Game Developers' Conference (GDC) kicking off tomorrow in San Francisco, Khronos' Vulkan working group today released Vulkan 1.1.104 that comes with several noteworthy extensions. Vulkan 1.1.104 is the big update for GDC 2019 rather than say Vulkan 1.2, but it's quite a nice update as part of the working group's weekly/bi-weekly release regiment. In particular, Vulkan 1.1.104 is exciting for an AMD native HDR extension and also a full-screen exclusive extension.
  • Interested In FreeSync With The RADV Vulkan Driver? Testing Help Is Needed
    Since the long-awaited introduction of FreeSync support with the Linux 5.0 kernel, one of the missing elements has been this variable rate refresh support within the RADV Vulkan driver. When the FreeSync/VRR bits were merged into Linux 5.0, the RadeonSI Gallium3D support was quick to land for OpenGL games but RADV Vulkan support was not to be found. Of course, RADV is the unofficial Radeon open-source Vulkan driver not officially backed by AMD but is the more popular driver compared to their official AMDVLK driver or the official but closed driver in their Radeon Software PRO driver package (well, it's built from the same sources as AMDVLK but currently with their closed-source shader compiler rather than LLVM). So RADV support for FreeSync has been one of the features users have been quite curious about and eager to see.

New Screencasts: Xubuntu 18.04.2, Ubuntu MATE, and Rosa Fresh 11

9 Admirable Graphical File Managers

Being able to navigate your local filesystem is an important function of personal computing. File managers have come a long way since early directory editors like DIRED. While they aren’t cutting-edge technology, they are essential software to manage any computer. File management consists of creating, opening, renaming, moving / copying, deleting and searching for files. But file managers also frequently offer other functionality. In the field of desktop environments, there are two desktops that dominate the open source landscape: KDE and GNOME. They are smart, stable, and generally stay out of the way. These use the widget toolkits Qt and GTK respectively. And there are many excellent Qt and GTK file managers available. We covered the finest in our Qt File Managers Roundup and GTK File Managers Roundup. But with Linux, you’re never short of alternatives. There are many graphical non-Qt and non-Gtk file managers available. This article examines 9 such file managers. The quality is remarkably good. Read more