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Linux

Linux Filesystems Explained — EXT2/3/4, XFS, Btrfs, ZFS

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Linux

The first time I installed Ubuntu on my computer, when I was sixteen, I was astonished by the number of filesystems that were available for the system installation. There were so many that I was left overwhelmed and confused. I was worried that if I picked the wrong one my system might run too slow or that it might be more problematic than another. I wanted to know which was the best.

Since then, things have changed quite a bit. Many Linux distributions offer a ‘standard’ filesystem that an installation will default to unless otherwise specified. I think this was a very good move because it assists newcomers in making a decision and being comfortable with it. But, for those that are still unsure of some of the contemporary offerings, we’ll be going through them today.

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Gain access to an ARM server running Linux OS, through the cloud

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OS
Linux

The Linaro Developer Cloud has gone live, and users can apply to test an ARM-based server with Linux

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SparkyLinux Now Lets Users Test Drive Linux Kernel 4.7, Here's How to Install It

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Linux

Just one day after the announcement of the GA release of the Linux 4.7 kernel, the SparkyLinux developers inform their users that they can now test drive the new kernel from the unstable repository.

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Clear Linux Is Among the First Distros to Adopt Kernel 4.7, X.Org Server 1.18.4

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Linux

Today, July 26, 2016, Softpedia was informed by the Clear Linux team about the availability of new software updates for the GNU/Linux operating system designed for the Intel architecture.

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Linux 4.7

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Linux
  • Collabora contributions to Linux Kernel 4.7

    Linux Kernel 4.7 was released this week with a total of 36 contributions from five Collabora engineers. It includes the first contributions from Helen as Collaboran and the first ever contributions on the kernel from Robert Foss. Here are some of the highlights of the work Collabora have done on Linux Kernel 4.7.

    Enric added support for the Analogix anx78xx DRM Bridge and fixed two SD Card related issues on OMAP igep00x0: fix remove/insert detection and enable support to read the write-protect pin.

    Gustavo de-staged the sync_file framework (Android Sync framework) that will be used to add explicit fencing support to the graphics pipeline and started a work to clean up usage of legacy vblank helpers.

  • The new Linux Kernel 4.7 is now officially released

    For users who are running some form of Linux, this should come as welcome news--the final version of the Linux Kernel 4.7 is now finally released. Linux founder Linus Torvalds said of the announcement, “Despite it being two weeks since rc7, the final patch wasn’t all that big, and much of it is trivial one- and few-liners. There’s a couple of network drivers that got a bit more loving.”

  • Linux 4.7 lands

Samsung to setup a Tizen Academy in Telangana, India

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Linux

Samsung originally released their first Tizen smartphone, the Samsung Z1, in India last year and with that move have signalled the importance of the Indian sub-continent to their future Tizen plans. Now, the korean tech giant is looking at setting up a Tizen Academy in the Telangana state in India. Samsung Electronics this month have signed an agreement with the Telangana Academy of Skill and Training (TASK). As part of the deal App developers from the Telangana state will receive special mentoring on the Tizen Operating System (OS).

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Open is the solution to improving 21st century education

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Linux
OSS

Much of the Internet runs Linux and open source software, yet in most of our schools—whether PK-12 or higher education—Linux and open source software are given short shrift.

Linux has made serious inroads on hand-held devices, the desktop, and the Internet of things (IoT) that use platforms such as Raspberry Pi, Galileo, and Arduino. Despite this astounding growth, a relatively small number of secondary and post-secondary schools offer technology training that prepares students for increasingly in-demand technical skills. The growth of the maker movement and the concurrent interest in STEM skills, which include coding and ethical hacking, may provide a much-needed impetus to change this trend.

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Dale Raby: How do you Fedora?

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Linux
Interviews

Dale started using Linux around 1999 when he became disconcerted with his Windows 95 computer and a young clerk in an office supply store told him about Linux. “I started reading some of the magazines, most notably Maximum Linux and eventually got to know their senior editor, Woody Hughes and Show Me the Code columnist Mae Ling Mak,” said Raby. His first distribution was Mandrake 6.5 which came in a box with a boot floppy.

Raby manages a small gun shop in Green Bay, Wisconsin. He is also an author with four published books: The Post-Apocalyptic Blacksmith, 777 Bon Mots for Gunslighers and Other Real Men, The Wives of Jacob I, and In the Beginning.

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Korora 24 "Sheldon" Linux Is Available Only for 64-bit PCs, Based on Fedora 24

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Linux
Red Hat

After a long wait, the Korora 24 GNU/Linux distribution has been released, based, as its version number suggests, on many of the technologies included in the popular Fedora 24 operating system.

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More in Tux Machines

How To Build A Raspberry Pi Smartwatch — The Geekiest Watch Ever Made

In our Getting Started With Raspberry Pi series, we’ve introduced you to the basics of Pi, told you how to get everything you need, and help you boot a basic operating system. But, Raspberry Pi is much more than that. You can use it as a TOR proxy router, build your own PiPhone, and even install Windows 10 IoT. This little device comes with lots of flexibility, that allows it to be used in multiple applications. Well, did you ever think about wearing your Raspberry Pi? If your answer is NO, I won’t be surprised. If you imagine a scenario where Raspberry Pi is used to build a smartwatch, it would look too bulky. Well, that’s the thing about making geeky things that set you apart from the regular crowd, right? Read more

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Yakkety Yak Alpha 2 Released
  • Ubuntu 16.10 "Yakkety Yak" Alpha 2 Released
    Today marks the second alpha release for Ubuntu 16.10 "Yakkety Yak" flavors participating in these early development releases. Participating in today's Yakkety Yak Alpha 2 development milestone are Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Ubuntu Kylin. No Xubuntu or Kubuntu releases to report on this morning.
  • PSA: Ubuntu 15.10 Hits End of Life Today
    It's time to wave a weary goodbye to the Wily Werewolf, as Ubuntu 15.10 support ends today.
  • Jono Bacon on Life After (and Before) GitHub
    Do you want to know what it takes to be a professional community manager? This interview will show you the kind of personality that does well at it, and how Jono Bacon, one of the world’s finest community managers, discovered Linux and later found his way into community management. Bacon is world-famous as the long-time community manager for Ubuntu. He was so good, I sometimes think his mother sang “you’ll be a community manager by and by” to him when he was a baby. In 2014 he went to XPRIZE, not a FOSS company, but important nevertheless. From there he dove back into FOSS as community manager for GitHub. Now Bacon is a freelance, self-employed community manager. One of his major clients is HackerOne, whose CEO is Bacon’s and my mutual friend Mårten Mickos. But HackerOne is far from his only client. In the interview he says he recently got back from visiting a client in China, and that he has more work then he can handle.

I've been Linuxing since before you were born

Once upon a time, there was no Linux. No, really! It did not exist. It was not like today, with Linux everywhere. There were multiple flavors of Unix, there was Apple, and there was Microsoft Windows. When it comes to Windows, the more things change, the more they stay the same. Despite adding 20+ gigabytes of gosh-knows-what, Windows is mostly the same. (Except you can't drop to a DOS prompt to get actual work done.) Hey, who remembers Gorilla.bas, the exploding banana game that came in DOS? Fun times! The Internet never forgets, and you can play a Flash version on Kongregate.com. Apple changed, evolving from a friendly system that encouraged hacking to a sleek, sealed box that you are not supposed to open, and that dictates what hardware interfaces you are allowed to use. 1998: no more floppy disk. 2012: no more optical drive. The 12-inch MacBook has only a single USB Type-C port that supplies power, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, external storage, video output, and accessories. If you want to plug in more than one thing at a time and don't want to tote a herd of dongles and adapters around with you, too bad. Next up: The headphone jack. Yes, the one remaining non-proprietary standard hardware port in Apple-land is doomed. Read more