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Linux

7 Linux Misconceptions Debunked

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I’ll admit, it’s hard to gauge how many users exist. Linux is free to download, and no single company has control. There are no sales figures to go by. TV and print ads aren’t shaping your perception.

Yet even if most of the people you know may not use Linux, there may be one who does. And many more will have no idea they interact with Linux every single day.

As it turns out, Linux has millions of users. Know what else it has? Other misconceptions that continue to give people a false idea of what Linux is like.

Let’s debunk a few, one by one.

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Pi project: Underwater drone

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Linux

“The ROV is controlled with a joystick connected to a laptop. The laptop runs Python scripts, and with PyGame I can read the signals from the joystick. The signals are then translated into servo commands and sent to the Raspberry Pi via a simple socket connection. The Raspberry Pi is the brain of the ROV; it communicates with the surface laptop via Ethernet. Thanks to the OpenROV project, I learnt to implement a Tenda home plug, which reduces the communication lines from four to two wires, increases the reach from about 50 metres with a submerged CAT5 to 300 metres, and makes the signal much less susceptible to noise.”

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Emacspeak, an audible interface for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Screen readers such as Orca work by describing the graphical environment to the user. They deconstruct an arbitrary visual environment that's built on top of an inherently text-based system. On some systems, this is necessary because there's no access—at least pragmatically—to the OS by any other means than the graphical interface. As most Linux users know, however, a graphical interface on a good Unix system is entirely optional in the first place, so there's no need to generate one, deconstruct it, and describe it; the computer can just spit out text.

I am aware of two efforts forging this path: Emacspeak and ADRIANE (on Knoppix). In this article, we'll take an in-depth look at the former.

Emacspeak is an audible interface that allows non-sighted users to interact independently and efficiently with a computer, entirely by way of text input and output. Emacspeak uses "audio formatting" and W3C's Aural CSS to produce a full audio representation of input and output.

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Kernel Space/Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Computex 2016: Linux cannot yet use Intel's Turbo Boost Max 3.0 mode

    Beyond the sheer number of cores on offer in the new Intel Extreme Edition chips announced earlier this week at Computex, one of the other selling points for the processors is an improved Turbo Boost mode.

  • Linux Kernel 4.4.12 LTS Has ARM64, x86, and CIFS Improvements, Updated Drivers

    Immediately after informing the Linux community about the availability of Linux kernel 4.6.1 and Linux kernel 4.5.6, Greg Kroah-Hartman published details about the release of Linux kernel 4.4.12 LTS.

  • Linux Kernel 4.5.6 Arrives for Stable Distros with AArch64 and CIFS Improvements

    After announcing the release of the first update of the Linux 4.6 kernel series, Greg Kroah-Hartman informed the community about the availability of the sixth maintenance build in the Linux 4.5 kernel branch.

    Linux kernel 4.5.6 is now available for select GNU/Linux operating systems that have already adopted a kernel from the Linux 4.5 series, which many popular distributions did, including, but not limited to Arch Linux, openSUSE Tumbleweed, Gentoo Linux, Birds Linux, Webconverger, Sabayon, Fedora, Slackware, and Debian.

Linux 4.5.6

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.5.6 kernel.

All users of the 4.5 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.5.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.5.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

thanks,

greg k-h

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Also: Linux 4.4.12

Linux 3.14.71

Linux Kernel 4.6 Gets Its First Point Release, Brings F2FS, x86 and ARM64 Fixes

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Linux

Today, June 1, 2016, renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman has had the great pleasure of releasing the first maintenance version of the Linux 4.6 kernel.

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Also: Linux 4.6.1

Arch Linux 2016.06.01 Now Available for Download, Ships with Linux Kernel 4.5.4

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Linux

It's June 1, which means that another awesome month starts for Linux users, and it also means that we can get our hands on a new ISO image of the Arch Linux operating system.

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Linux and Linux Foundation

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Linux

ZFS: Finding Its Way to a Linux Near You?

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Linux

It seems like only yesterday that I read Jeff Bonwick's blog entry "ZFS: The Last Word in Filesystems". It was Halloween of 2005 that ZFS was fully integrated into Sun Microsystem's Solaris, and the filesystem was very well received. For the readers not familiar with ZFS, it is a combined all-purpose filesystem and volume manager. It simplified data storage management while also offering the most advanced features of the time. Such technologies include drive pooling with software RAID support, file snapshots, in-line data compression, data deduplication, built-in data integrity, advanced caching (to DRAM and SSD), and more. Today, the ZFS trademark and technology is owned and maintained by the Oracle Corporation.

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Also: Wayland 1.12 Planned For Release In September

Linux Lite 3 Is Now Available With A New Login Manager, Many GUI Improvements And Bug Fixes

Filed under
Linux
News
Reviews

Linux Lite, a Ubuntu LTS based and lightweight Linux distribution is focused on Windows users who want to turn to Linux easily. The distribution has always been trying to make it so easy that any Windows user has no trouble performing regular tasks on Linux Lite. Linux Lite was improved a lot in 2 series and now there is starting of series 3 with many improvements.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more