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GNU/Linux Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Not Love

    I had seen GNU/Linux once before in my life. At a previous school, the husband of one of the teachers installed it on a PC in my presence. He couldn’t get it working…. Still, I read that GNU/Linux did not crash. I needed that. I was willing to make the effort to download and install GNU/Linux if I could have only that. Our Internet connection was a few KB/s on dial-up… I spent two weekends and five evenings downloading an .iso CD-image with FileZilla or something on a Mac in the lab. I had never burned a CD before but tried once copying the file to the CD. That wouldn’t boot. I discovered CD imaging… So, on the second try, I had a CD that would boot on the machines. I first did one machine and it wouldn’t start X. Having never seen X before, this was a problem but it turned out all I needed was the scanning frequencies for the CRT in a configuration file. Google helped me find those for each of my five different kinds of monitors. Suddenly, the PCs were useful with GNU/Linux.

  • Linux Under the Hood: Silence of the RAM

    Now that I see the events of the last week chronicled clearly in front of my very eyes, maybe the disparaging old junk man was right after all. I’m shameless enough to admit my own idiocy as long as it leads to learning from my mistakes. Maybe Linux isn’t rocket science, but installing RAM was sure beginning to feel like it.

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  • 30 days in a terminal: Day 10 — The experiment is over

    When I set out to spend 30 days living entirely in a Linux terminal, I knew there was a distinct possibility I would fail utterly. I mean, 30 days? No GUI software? No Xorg? Just describing it sounds like torture.

    And torture it was. Mostly. Some moments, though, were pretty damned amazing. Not amazing enough to help me reach my 30-day goal, mind you. I fell short—only making it to day 10.

  • Bad Voltage Episode 70 Has Been Released: Delicious Amorphous Tech Bubble
  • Tokyo: Automotive Linux Summit

    Engineers will gather in Tokyo July 13-14 for the annual Automotive Linux Summit, a conference where auto-industry stakeholders discuss the adoption of an open-source Linux-based platform for in-vehicle infotainment.

    The two-day summit brings together automotive systems engineers, Linux experts, developers and other players.

  • Oxenfree, an adventure game with supernatural elements, available on Linux

    This well-received indie title has been ported over to Linux. Combining plenty of elements of 80s teen movies and packaging them in a polished adventure, Oxenfree may be worth checking out if you’re a fan of adventure games.

  • Space station management game, The Spatials: Galactology, is confirmed to be coming for Linux

    This is an expanded and reimagined version of the management sim, The Spatials. It’s yet to be released but the developers have confirmed that a Linux version is in the works.

  • Red Hat Storage VP sees different uses for Ceph, Gluster

    Red Hat Storage showed off updates to its Ceph and Gluster software and laid out its strategy for working with containers at this week’s Red Hat Summit in San Francisco.

Linux Mint Coverage

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Enlightenment DR 0.21.0 Release

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Enlightenment DR 0.21.0 Release
  • Enlightenment 0.21 Released With Its Much Better Wayland Support

    Another Enlightenment release, another round of significant Wayland improvements.

  • Enlightenment 0.21.0 Desktop Environment Released with Better Wayland Support

    Today, June 30, 2016, Mike Blumenkrantz from the Enlightenment project has had the great pleasure of announcing the final release of the Enlightenment DR 0.21.0 desktop environment.

    Enlightenment is a free window manager/desktop environment distributed under an open source license for all and any GNU/Linux operating system that wants to either adopt it as the default user interface or include it in the software repositories.

    The main goal of the Enlightenment desktop environment is to be as lightweight as possible, but at the same time beautiful, and last but not least, provide users with the latest, cutting-edge technologies.

Transcend Wifi SD Card Is A Tiny Linux Server

Filed under
Linux
Server

He read a post about these cards on the OpenWRT forums. They’re all a similar configuration of a relatively large amount of memory (compared to the usual embedded computer), a WiFi chip, and an ARM processor running a tiny Linux install. The card acts as a WiFi access point with a little server running on it, and waits for the user to connect to it via a website. It also has a mode where it will connect to up to three access points specified by the user, but it doesn’t actually have a way to tell the user what its IP address is; which is kind of funny.

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Atom-based gateway taps new open source IoT cloud platform

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
OSS

Eurotech’s rugged, IP40 protected “ReliaGate 20-26” IoT gateway runs Red Hat Linux on a Bay Trail Atom, and has cellular, GPS, WiFi, and Bluetooth options.

Eurotech’s ReliaGate 20-26 is the latest in a line of Internet of Things gateways, such as the ReliaGate 10-11, based on a TI AM3352 Sitara SoC, and the Intel Atom Z510-based ReliaGate 50-21. For the ReliaGate 20-26, Eurotech advances to a more modern “Bay Trail” Atom E3800.

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Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
  • Atom-based gateway taps new open source IoT cloud platform

    Eurotech’s rugged, IP40 protected “ReliaGate 20-26” IoT gateway runs Red Hat Linux on a Bay Trail Atom, and has cellular, GPS, WiFi, and Bluetooth options.

    Eurotech’s ReliaGate 20-26 is the latest in a line of Internet of Things gateways, such as the ReliaGate 10-11, based on a TI AM3352 Sitara SoC, and the Intel Atom Z510-based ReliaGate 50-21. For the ReliaGate 20-26, Eurotech advances to a more modern “Bay Trail” Atom E3800.

  • Rugged COM Express Type 6 modules adopt Skylake and Braswell

    Win Enterprises unveiled a COM Express Compact module for Intel Braswell, following two COM Express releases for Skylake. They all operate from -40 to 85°C.

    The Win Enterprises MB-73450 is a 95 x 95mm COM Express Type 6 Compact computer-on-module that supports Intel Pentium and Celeron N3000, as well as Intel Atom x5-E8000, system-on-chips from the 14nm “Braswell” family. The module is the third in a new wave of Win Enterprises COM Express modules with Intel chips released in recent months.

  • Tough Mini-PC with up to four GbE ports runs Linux Mint on AMD SoC

    CompuLab’s Fitlet-RM is a rugged mini-PC that runs Linux Mint on an AMD A10 Micro-6700T, and offers -40 to 70°C operation, WiFi, and up to four GbE ports.

Review: Linux Mint 18 (Sarah)

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

If you were looking to jump the Ubuntu ship completely, then we recommend taking a look at our recent Review of Fedora 24. It’s equally as good as Mint 18 and equally worthy of your consideration.

Between Linux Mint 18 and Fedora 24, we reckon it’s exciting times in the Linux world. With the exception and onset of the boring world of vanilla Ubuntu releases, Linux feels reinvigorated and fresh once again. Jump on board, because it can only get better from here.

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How Linux and Open Source Are Powering Comcast’s Massive Infrastructure

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Comcast is a heavy user of Linux, and it touches everything: from back-end servers to customer facing devices like X1 products. Muehl said. “Comcast, like so many others, is a very Linux-heavy operating system company.”

Comcast’s choice of Linux flavors is interesting. “Generally speaking, we're more on the open-source side of those Linux distributions than the commercial side of those Linux distributions,” said Muehl. Comcast is using Ubuntu and CentOS.

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Red Hat touts Linux experience as container differentiator

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

With containers built on Linux, Red Hat believes vendors touting products in this space can do so effectively only when they have the ability to fully support a commercial Linux distribution.

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Giving Linux and LibreOffice a Try for Your Home Office

Filed under
GNU
LibO
Linux

Running your home office on a tight budget? There's a way to get all of your software—operating system (OS), productivity suite, scores of applications—completely free. It'll cost you, but not in the way you might think.

This life-changing alternative is Linux, which gives you more flexibility, more have-it-your-way customization, and more control than Windows or OS X users could ever dream of. I caution that it'll cost you because it's decidedly not for everyone. While it's far friendlier today than it was a year or even six months ago, Linux still requires you to invest, nay, enjoy some time spent setting up and tinkering with your PC.

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Also: New LibreOffice Vulnerability Patched in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Debian and Arch Linux

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Women In Tech: Jane Silber, CEO Of Canonical

When I sat down to interview Jane Silber, CEO of Canonical, I don’t think it was lost on either of us that our ability to chat freely even though I was in my office in the middle of the U.S. and she was in her office in London, England had everything to do with cloud computing, an area in which her company does brisk business. Silber has been running Canonical (maker of Ubuntu, among a great many other software products) in one form or another for well over a decade at this point, first as COO and now CEO. She answers questions thoughtfully, with carefully chosen words; even though I’m sure I’m not the first journalist to ask her some of the below questions (maybe not even the first one this week), she had no canned responses, and she never veered off course to discuss her own agenda. There were no preset talking points; simply, I asked questions, and she answered them. Read more