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Puppy Linux Derivative Fatdog64 Gets New Release with Linux 4.14, UEFI Installer

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Linux

Prominent new features of the Fatdog64 720 release include a UEFI Installer that lets users install the GNU/Linux distribution on modern UEFI machines using USB flash drives, the implementation of LICK Installer 1.2 by default in the ISO image, and libinput support for X.Org Server by default, replacing Synaptics and evdev.

Fatdog64 720 also ships with a home-made touchpad configuration client designed as a drop-in replacement for flSynclient, a new keyboard layout that supports multiple layouts, support for dual-nano initrd in the ISO image, as well as new and updated parameters including waitdev and mergeinitrd{n}.

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Dual Boot Ubuntu And Arch Linux

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Linux

​Dual booting Ubuntu and Arch Linux is not as easy as it sounds, however, I’ll make the process as easy as possible with much clarity. First, we will need to install Ubuntu then Arch Linux since it's much easier configuring the Ubuntu grub to be able to dual boot Ubuntu and Arch Linux.

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Syzbot: Google Continuously Fuzzing The Linux Kernel

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Linux
Google

On the Linux kernel mailing list over the past week has been a discussion about Syzbot, an effort by Google for continuously fuzzing the mainline Linux kernel and its branches with automatic bug reporting.

Syzbot is the automation bot around Syzkaller, the Google-developed unsupervised kernel fuzzer that has since been extended to support FreeBSD, Fuchsia, NetBSD, and Windows. For those curious how the Syzkaller fuzzer works, it's documented via their GitHub documentation and the main project site. Syzkaller has been heavily developed over the past nearly two years while Syzbot is the more recent effort.

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Devices: Raspberry Pi, Tizen and Android/Eelo

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Android
Linux

Kernel: Jailhouse 0.8 Released, Intel Lockdown, Btrfs RAID1/RAID10 Improvements

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Linux
  • Jailhouse 0.8 released

    We are happy to announce a new version of the partitioning hypervisor Jailhouse.

  • Jailhouse v0.8 Linux Hypervisor Released

    The past few years Siemens has been working on Jailhouse as a Linux-based partitioning hypervisor that has aimed to be a lighter alternative to KVM. It's been seven months since the last update, but now Jailhouse 0.8 is now available.

  • Cannonlake/Icelake Desktop CPUs Won't Have PKU Memory Protection Support

    Support for Memory Protection Keys (a.k.a. PKU / PKEYs) was finished up this year in the Linux kernel, glibc, and related components. This memory protection feature premiered with Intel Xeon Scalable CPUs and is said to be coming to future desktop CPUs, but it doesn't look like that's happening for the Cannonlake or Icelake generations.

    Memory Protection Keys is a means of enforcing page-based protections by making use of some previously ignored bits in each page table entry, previously outlined and also documented in greater technical detail via the kernel documentation.

  • Btrfs Gets A RAID1/10 Speed Patch, Helping Out SSDs

    A new Btrfs file-system kernel driver patch is now available to improve its RAID1/RAID10 read performance, particularly for SSDs.

    In our Btrfs RAID benchmarks even recently the results haven't been the most compelling against say EXT4 with MD RAID, but for at least RAID 1 and 10 levels it looks like some read improvements could be on the way.

Top 10 Most Popular Linux Distributions of 2017

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GNU
Linux

As the year 2017 comes to an end, it’s time to find out which Linux distributions are most popular. However, the news of the Linux world at the Desktop level was not very surprising, while in the segment of Internet of Things, Blockchain and Cloud, Linux has been one of the systems in the spotlight.

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Linux Lite 3.8 Beta Released

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GNU
Linux

Linux Lite 3.8 Beta is now available for testing. There have been a number of changes since the 3.6 release.
This is the last release for Series 3.x

Linux Lite 3.8 Final will be released on February 1st, 2018.

The changes for Linux Lite 3.8 include - more support for LibreOffice, regional support for DVDs, a Font Viewer/Installer and we now have our own Google based Search page as the home page in Firefox. We've also added TLP for Laptops to Lite Tweaks.

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Linux Kernel Developer: Shuah Khan

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Linux
Interviews

The Linux Kernel community should continue its focus on adding support for new hardware, harden the security, and improve quality. Focusing on effective ways to proactively detect security vulnerabilities, race conditions, and hard-to-find problems will help towards achieving the above goals. As a process issue, community would have to take a close look at the maintainer to developer ratio to avoid maintainer fatigue and bottlenecks.

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How to Configure Linux for Children

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GNU
Linux

If you’ve been around computers for a while, you might associate Linux with a certain stereotype of computer user. How do you know someone uses Linux? Don’t worry, they’ll tell you.

But Linux is an exceptionally customizable operating system. This allows users an unprecedented degree of control. In fact, parents can set up a specialized distro of Linux for children, ensuring children don’t stumble across dangerous content accidentally. While the process is more prolonged than using Windows, it’s also more powerful and durable. Linux is also free, which can make it well-suited for classroom or computer lab deployment.

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Why Are Alphabets On A Keyboard Jumbled?

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Linux

For Once at least in your life, you must have asked yourself ‘Why are the Alphabets on a keyboard Jumbled?’. You are not alone as there are many of us who feel that we should have gone simply in alphabetical order. But there is a story to it.

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More in Tux Machines

Top 4 open source alternatives to Google Analytics

If you have a website or run an online business, collecting data on where your visitors or customers come from, where they land on your site, and where they leave is vital. Why? That information can help you better target your products and services, and beef up the pages that are turning people away. To gather that kind of information, you need a web analytics tool. Many businesses of all sizes use Google Analytics. But if you want to keep control of your data, you need a tool that you can control. You won’t get that from Google Analytics. Luckily, Google Analytics isn’t the only game on the web. Here are four open source alternatives to Google Analytics. Read more

Welcome To The (Ubuntu) Bionic Age: Nautilus, a LTS and desktop icons

If you are following closely the news of various tech websites, one of the latest hot topic in the community was about Nautilus removing desktop icons. Let’s try to clarify some points to ensure the various discussions around it have enough background information and not reacting on emotions only as it could be seen lately. You will have both downstream (mine) and upstream (Carlos) perspectives here. Read more

Programming: Perl, JavaScript, Ick, PowerFake, pylint-django, nbdkit filters

  • An Open Letter to the Perl Community

    Some consider Perl 6 to be a sister language to Perl 5. Personally, I consider Perl 6 more of a genetically engineered daughter language with the best genes from many parents. A daughter with a difficult childhood, in which she alienated many, who is now getting out of puberty into early adulthood. But I digress.

  • Long Live Perl 5!

    While not mentioned in the original Letter, a frequent theme in the comments was that Perl 6 should be renamed, as the name is inaccurate or is damaging.

    This is the topic on which I wrote more than once and those who have been following closely know that, yes, many (but by no means all) in the Perl 6 community acknowledge the name is detrimental to both Perl 6 and Perl 5 projects.

    This is why with a nod of approval from Larry we're moving to create an alias to Perl 6 name during 6.d language release, to be available for marketing in areas where "Perl 6" is not a desirable name.

  • JavaScript Trends for 2018
    Trying to bet on how many new JavaScript frameworks will be released each month, is, the best software engineer’s game in the past 5 years.
  • Ick: a continuous integration system
    TL;DR: Ick is a continuous integration or CI system. See http://ick.liw.fi/ for more information.
  • Introducing PowerFake for C++
    PowerFake is a new mini-framework/tool to make it possible to fake/mock free functions and static & non-virtual member functions in C++. It requires no change to the code under test, but it might need some structural changes, like moving some parts of the code to a different .cpp file; or making inline functions non-inline when built for testing. It is useful for writing unit tests and faking/mocking functions which should not/cannot be run during a test case. Some say that such a feature is useful for existing code, but should not be needed for a code which is written testable from the beginning. But, personally I don’t agree that it is always appropriate to inject such dependencies using virtual interfaces or templates. Currently, it is not supposed to become a mocking framework on its own. I hope that I can integrate PowerFake into at least one existing C++ mocking framework. Therefore, currently it doesn’t provide anything beyond faking existing functions.
  • Introducing pylint-django 0.8.0
    Since my previous post was about writing pylint plugins I figured I'd let you know that I've released pylint-django version 0.8.0 over the weekend. This release merges all pull requests which were pending till now so make sure to read the change log.
  • nbdkit filters
    nbdkit is our toolkit for creating Network Block Device (NBD) servers from “unusual” data sources. nbdkit was already configurable by writing simple plugins in several programming languages. Last week Eric Blake and I added a nice new feature: You can now modify existing plugins by placing “filters” in front of them.

Moving to Linux from dated Windows machines

Every day, while working in the marketing department at ONLYOFFICE, I see Linux users discussing our office productivity software on the internet. Our products are popular among Linux users, which made me curious about using Linux as an everyday work tool. My old Windows XP-powered computer was an obstacle to performance, so I started reading about Linux systems (particularly Ubuntu) and decided to try it out as an experiment. Two of my colleagues joined me. Read more