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Linux

Flash ROMs with a Raspberry Pi

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Linux

I previously wrote a series of articles about my experience flashing a ThinkPad X60 laptop with Libreboot. After that, the Libreboot project expanded its hardware support to include the ThinkPad X200 series, so I decided to upgrade. The main challenge with switching over to the X200 was that unlike the X60, you can't perform the initial Libreboot flash with software. Instead, you actually need to disassemble the laptop to expose the BIOS chip, clip a special clip called a Pomona clip to it that's wired to some device that can flash chips, cross your fingers and flash.

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How Linux Conquered the Data Center

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Linux

Some of the people who worked to create the original Linux operating system kernel remember this time with almost crystal clarity, as though a bright flashbulb indelibly etched its image on the canvasses of their minds.

It was the weekend before the 18th anniversary of the first moon landing: July 20, 1998. Red Hat was continuing to gather together names of new allies and prospective supporters for its enterprise Linux. Several more of the usual suspects had joined the party: Netscape, Informix, Borland’s Interbase, Computer Associates (now CA), Software AG. These were the challengers in the Windows software market, the names to which the VARs attached extra discounts. As a single glimpse of the Softsel Hot List or the Ingram Micro D sales chart would tell any CIO studying the market, none of these names were the leaders in their respective software categories, nor were they expected to become leaders.

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Which is the fastest web browser for Linux PC/laptops

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Linux

Web browsers are one the most important constituents of any computer in today’s world. Without web browser, there can be no Internet and surfing. So which web browser is most popular among Linux users. According to a survey done by LinuxQuestions, Mozilla’s Firefox was all time favorite among Linux users with nearly a 51.7 percent of them using Firefox. Google’s Chrome came in second with a mere 15.67 percent. The rest of the vote being divided between a multitude of obscure browsers.mostly in single percentages.

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Linux distributions: Rolling releases vs point releases, which should you choose?

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Linux

My recent experiences with installing a number of different Linux distributions on a new ASUS notebook have provided an interesting illustration of the differences between "rolling release" and "point release" distributions. I would like to go into a bit more detail about that here.

First, for those who might not be familiar with the two release models, I will explain each of them -- and to avoid boring most others, I will keep the descriptions very brief.

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Low-cost COM/baseboard combo taps power-sipping -A5 SoC

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Linux

MYIR’s Linux 4.1 driven, $49 “MYC-JA5D2X” COM offers a Cortex-A5 SAMA5D2 SoC and -40 to 85°C support, and is available as part of a $129 development kit.

MYIR’s SODIMM-style, 200-pin MYC-JA5D2X module has the same 67.6 x 45mm dimensions as its MYC-JA5D4X computer-on-module, and similarly runs Linux on an Cortex-A5 based Atmel SAMA5 SoC. Instead of tapping the SAMA5D42 or SAMA5D44, however, the MYC-JA5D2X moves to the newer, more power efficient SAMA5D2.

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Review: The Endless Mission One is a gorgeous Linux-powered desktop with a tempting price tag

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Linux
Reviews

Companies that exclusively manufacture Linux computers are few and far between. The few that exist tend to focus on the “prosumer” or developer market niche. Endless, however, has tread a different path. The San Francisco-based manufacturer is known for its quirky line of affordable machines, all running its own bespoke Linux-based operating system, Endless OS.

Announced at CES earlier this year, the Endless Mission One is the latest in the company’s burgeoning stable of computers. And compared to the rest of Endless’ lineup, it’s a bit of an aberration.

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Munich might still stick to Linux agreement

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Linux

The poster child for the use of Linux by government authorities, the City of Munich, might stick to its commitment to the operating system after all.

There had been ructions in Munich over whether its move to Linux had been such a good idea and if it had saved as much as it thought it had.

Most media have reported that a final call was made to halt the LiMux and switch back to Microsoft software, but the Free Software Foundation Europe says this is fake news.

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Collabora's Focus on Advancing the Performance of Open Source Graphics in Linux

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Linux
OSS

Collabora's Mark Filion is informing Softpedia about some of the latest developments the company has been working on to improve graphics support in the open source Mesa 3D Graphics Library, as well as the Wayland and Weston technologies.

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Also: Mesa 17.0.1 Adds Better Support for "The Binding of Isaac: Rebirth," Other Games

Fatdog64 Linux review

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Do not be mislead by the use of "fat" in the name, Fatdog64 is a very lightweight Linux distribution. It is only "fat" compared to Puppy Linux, which Fatdog originally derived from. The first release of Fatdog was as an expansion package for Puppy Linux before becoming a distribution in its own right. As such, Fatdog releases ship with more pre-installed packages than Puppy Linux, so by comparison it is "fatter."

Fatter, of course, is a relative term, so Fatdog64 710, the latest release, is much, much smaller than many other distributions. The ISO is a meagre 377MB. Despite the small download size, it still comes with a decent selection of software packed into the image. It uses Openbox as the default desktop environment with JVM being an alternative option, so no weighty GNOME or KDE, which really helps trim the proverbial fat.

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Also: This Week In Solus - Install #41

CRUX-Based Kwort 4.3.2 Linux OS Is Out with GTK3 Support, Improved Look and Feel

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OS
Linux

David Cortarello from the Kwort project, a GNU/Linux distribution that's fast, lightweight, modern, and based on CRUX Linux, announced the availability of the second point release to the Kwort 4.3 stable series.

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More in Tux Machines

SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension

Historically, data replication has been available only piecemeal through proprietary vendors. In a quest to remediate history, SUSE and partner LINBIT announced a solution that promises to change the economics of data replication. The two companies' collaborative effort is the headliner in the updated SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension, which now includes LINBIT's integrated geo-clustering technology. Read more

Tizen and Android

Open source is mission critical for Europe’s air traffic

It is entirely possible to use open source in a highly regulated environment such as air traffic control, says Dr Gerolf Ziegenhain, Head of Linux Competence & Service Centre (LCSC) in Mainz (Germany). Open source service providers can shield an organisation from the wide variety of development processes in the open source community. Read more

today's leftovers

  • DRM display resource leasing (kernel side)
    So, you've got a fine head-mounted display and want to explore the delights of virtual reality. Right now, on Linux, that means getting the window system to cooperate because the window system is the DRM master and holds sole access to all display resources. So, you plug in your device, play with RandR to get it displaying bits from the window system and then carefully configure your VR application to use the whole monitor area and hope that the desktop will actually grant you the boon of page flipping so that you will get reasonable performance and maybe not even experience tearing. Results so far have been mixed, and depend on a lot of pieces working in ways that aren't exactly how they were designed to work.
  • GUADEC accommodation
    At this year’s GUADEC in Manchester we have rooms available for you right at the venue in lovely modern student townhouses. As I write this there are still some available to book along with your registration. In a couple of days we have to a final numbers to the University for how many rooms we want, so it would help us out if all the folk who want a room there could register and book one now if you haven’t already done so! We’ll have some available for later booking but we have to pay up front for them now so we can’t reserve too many.
  • Kickstarter for Niryo One, open source 6-axis 3D printed robotic arm, doubles campaign goal
    A Kickstarter campaign for the Niryo One, an open source 3D printed 6-axis robotic arm, has more than doubled its €20,000 target after just a couple of days. The 3D printed robot is powered by Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and Robot Operating System.
  • Linux Action Show to End Eleven Year Run at LFNW
    Jupiter Broadcasting’s long-running podcast, Linux Action Show, will soon be signing off the air…er, fiber cable, for the last time. The show first streamed on June 10, 2006 and was hosted by “Linux Tycoon” Bryan Lunduke and Jupiter Broadcasting founder Chris Fisher. Lunduke left the show in 2012, replaced by Matt Hartley, who served as co-host for about three years. The show is currently hosted by Fisher and Noah Chelliah, president of Altispeed, an open source technology company located in Grand Forks, North Dakota.