Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

Exploring the security challenges in Linux-based IoT devices

Filed under
Linux

In a talk at the Embedded Linux Conference, Mike Anderson, CTO of The PTR Group, explored the unique security challenges that face Linux-based IoT devices.

Until fairly recently, Linux developers have been spared many of the security threats that have bedeviled the Windows world. Yet, when moving from desktops and servers to the embedded Internet of Things, a much higher threat level awaits.

Read more

Dumping Windows Overboard Because Linux Does It All

Filed under
Linux

I do understand how something that works fine today may not work fine tomorrow, but that holds true for Windows as well. To current Windows users who might be afraid to tinker with Linux, don’t let the hype of Windows stability fool you like it fooled me for ages upon ages.

I realize I’m not preaching to the choir here — I’m preaching from the choir. But the more I use Linux on my secondary machine, the more apt I am to use it on my main machine and resign Windows to second-class status in the homestead. I don’t see getting rid of Windows altogether at the moment, but my outlook might become even less Microsoft tolerant in the not-too-distant future as I find my Windows reliance loosening thanks to the power of FOSS.

Read more

Leftovers: Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Some news from LWN

    Nate will continue to contribute articles to LWN. But we suspect that the intricacies of Béziers, brush strokes, and kerning are going to take a lot of time and attention, meaning that we will be needing somebody to help fill his shoes. Thus, LWN is hiring. If you would like to write full-time for one of the most discriminating readerships in the world — but also one of the most interesting, engaged, and supportive readerships — we would like to hear from you. This is your chance to make your mark on one of the community's oldest publications.

    Speaking of "oldest," the basic format of LWN's Weekly Edition has changed little over the last 18 years. Some pages have come and gone (long-time readers will remember the desktop page, or the once-interesting "Linux in the News" page), but substantive changes have been few indeed. That format has served us well over the years; among other things, it helps us to ensure that each edition covers a wide range of topics. But it can also be somewhat limiting; it is a sort of treadmill of slots to be filled each week that makes it hard to focus on specific areas in response to what is happening in the community.

  • Blockchains and the public sector: Distributed ledger technology reaches the G-Cloud

    Isle of Man startup Credits has become the first to offer blockchain DLT to Britain's public sector

    Britain’s public sector can start experimenting with distributed ledger technology (DLT) for the first time after confirmation that blockchain-as-a-service startup Credits has been enrolled as part of the latest G-Cloud 8 framework agreement.

    Credits is a small Isle of Man firm whose back story was recently covered in sister title Techworld but access to the distributed ledger technology (DLT) that comes with blockchain marks an important milestone for the G-Cloud Digital Marketplace and its public sector users.

  • SDN: 7 Educational Opportunities

    Networking professionals hear all the time that they need to learn new skills to keep up with a rapidly changing industry. On-the-job training would be a practical option, but if your company hasn't plunged into software-defined networking – and plenty haven't -- how do you expand your knowledge when you're mired in CLI?

    As it turns out, the options for learning new approaches to networking are growing as SDN adoption gradually expands beyond hyper-scale Internet companies and service providers. This spring, the Linux Foundation rolled out a software-defined networking training course to address what the foundation described as a skills gap for networking pros. In launching the SDN training, the foundation said many network engineers lack experience with software virtualization.

  • New Linux Kernel Patches Tease Upcoming AMD FreeSync Support

    It appears that Linux gamers running AMD Radeon graphics cards could soon be treated to long-awaited FreeSync support. Some eagle-eyed folks at reddit spotted interesting Kernel patches submitted yesterday that both requests the addition of a FreeSync ioctl device, and also the mechanism for activating and deactivating FreeSync with full-screen apps.

    Because this patch would be implemented in the Linux kernel itself, the FreeSync mechanism should be able to work with both the open-source and proprietary drivers. I am unsure about the state of G-SYNC in the open-source Nouveau driver, but NVIDIA’s proprietary driver has supported G-SYNC for quite some time.

  • Partition disappears in Windows 10 Anniversary Update

    Microsoft hoped the Windows 10 Anniversary Update would literally be a revelation for all users, but shortly after installing the update, users encountered various issues. Despite Microsoft’s efforts to anticipate all the possible bugs, the list of complaints is getting longer every day.

  • GParted Live 0.26.1-5 Fixes VirtualBox BIOS Boot Issues, FAT32 Partition Support

    Curtis Gedak and the GParted team have announced the release and general availability for download of the GParted Live 0.26.1-5 stable Live system for OS-independent disk partitioning operations.

    Based on the latest Debian Sid software repository as of July 23, 2016, GParted Live 0.26.1-5 is here to patch a BIOS boot issue and missing window bars problem when running the Live system on the VirtualBox virtualization software, and improves support for FAT32 filesystems by patching the libparted library.

  • Accepted gcc-defaults 1.163 (source amd64 all) into unstable
  • Classified! LibreOffice 5.2 adds document access control

    LibreOffice 5.2, the newest version of the open source productivity suite, is aiming at becoming a tool of government and professional organizations, not merely a free substitute for Microsoft Office.

    Most notably, Version 5.2 supports the Transglobal Secure Collaboration Program (TSCP) standards for document classification. These standards describe the sensitivity of the information in a document and how heavily its access should be restricted.

  • Guess who this GNU is?
  • Guix System Distribution 0.11 Uses Linux-Libre Kernel 4.7, Supports RAID Devices

    Ludovic Courtès reports for the GNU Guix project, an open-source package management system for the GNU system, on the availability of the Guix System Distribution (GuixSD) 0.11.0.

    It appears that this is the first time we write here something about the Guix System Distribution, so we feel obliged to inform the reader about the fact that GuixSD is an advanced distribution of the GNU system powered by the Linux-libre kernel and using GNU Guix as default package manager, thus respecting user's freedom.

Phones With Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

A New Project for Linux at 25

Filed under
Linux

After Linux took off (as GPL'd free software), I could see clearly how freedom worked because the means were there—not just for demonstrating it to everybody, but for developing more and more with it. I suspect the same could be true for promise-based financial dealings such as rent and buy.

So my request here is to help Kevin debug the case he makes for his ideas, while putting them to work.

It helps also to remember the introduction of Linux as a mutation that not only proved free software could work in the world, but utterly changed the norms of software development, liberating vast amounts of development labor from the feudal castles of corporations and governments, while creating far more development opportunity along the way—so much that today there's a worldwide shortage of programmers.

Read more

Mint 18 review: “Just works” Linux doesn’t get any better than this

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Linux Mint 18 is a solid update and continues the slow but steady evolution of what may be the most popular Linux desktop out there. If you're an existing Mint user, it's definitely worth upgrading, though do bear in mind that this upgrade may be a bit more difficult compared to the very simple upgrade process for 17.x updates. As of this writing, Linux Mint has not published its usual upgrade guide, and I installed a clean copy, so I can't comment on the upgrade process.

Mint 18 remains my recommendation both for anyone who's new to Linux as well as seasoned Linux users who want a desktop that just works and gets out of the way. Thanks to its incremental development approach, its dedication to evolving features slowly, and its development of power user features and configuration options, Mint manages to serve both newcomers and Linux power users well.

Read more

The 'new' Microsoft Wipes GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Making the switch to open source as a non-programmer

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

This was sometime around 2008. I wasn't even 20 years old. I didn't know how to code (apart from basic HTML stuff), nor did I have any particular tech skills. However, I was part of a community radio station that was embedded in an open source culture. After a full year as a member of that community, I decided it was time to fully convert and decided to install a Linux-based OS on my first ever laptop.

My friends (and engineers-in-the-making) at Radio Zero were split between the recommended distributions, with some leaning towards Debian and others towards Ubuntu. After carefully listening to pros and cons and asking many times about whether I'd be able to actually work with any of them, I decided to go with Ubuntu.

I was determined to install an open source OS on my computer regardless of my Dad's* warnings about possible compatibility issues. Despite not being a programmer, or anything even remotely related, I was incredibly excited about what Linux had to offer. The promise of an operating system that was designed and developed with accessibility for all in mind, that you can tweak and improve as you please, and that is developed by and for the community sounded like a dream coming true. On top of all this, it was free. So, what was there not to like?

Read more

Toutou Linux 6.3.2 "SlaXen" Gets Second Alpha Milestone, Based on Puppy Linux

Filed under
Linux

The developers of Toutou, a minimalist GNU/Linux distribution based on Puppy Linux, are continuing the development of the Toutou Linux 6.3.2 "SlaXen" release with a second Alpha milestone.

Read more

Leftovers: Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • AMD Publishes More Open-Source FreeSync Code
  • ZeMarmot at GUADEC 2016

    We are all happy users of GNOME here, and this is the first time we will be in GUADEC, so this is pretty exciting. Both Aryeom, the film director, and myself, Jehan, are sponsored by the GNOME Foundation to present our film, produced with FLOSS, in room 1, on Sunday, August 14. We will talk about the movie, its current status, about our work on GIMP too, how GNOME and Free Software works in a media creation workflow, and so on. So we hope you will be many to check this out if you are around!

  • Debian Fun in July 2016

    July marked the fifteenth month I contributed to Debian LTS under the Freexian umbrella.

  • Review: The Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Touch phone

    When most people think of smartphones, they think of Android and iOS. But there are alternatives to those two mobile platforms. Enter the Meizu Pro 5 phone, which runs Ubuntu Touch as its operating system.

  • Android 7.0 Nougat Release Date: When Will My Phone Get The Update?

    As the final Android 7.0 Nougat release date is approaching, people are searching the web to know when their phone will get Nougat update. To answer your question, we have prepared a list of the popular brands, telling you about their plans to roll out the Android 7.0 Nougat update. While brands like Moto, Nexus, HTC, and LG are preparing for any early OTA update, other are likely to do the same in January-February 2017.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

KDevelop 5.0.0 release

Almost two years after the release of KDevelop 4.7, we are happy to announce the immediate availability of KDevelop 5.0. KDevelop is an integrated development environment focusing on support of the C++, Python, PHP and JavaScript/QML programming languages. Many important changes and refactorings were done for version 5.0, ensuring that KDevelop remains maintainable and easy to extend and improve over the next years. Highlights include much improved new C/C++ language support, as well as polishing for Python, PHP and QML/JS. Read more

CoreOS 1068.10.0 Released with Many systemd Fixes, Still Using Linux Kernel 4.6

Today, August 23, 2016, the development team behind the CoreOS security-oriented GNU/Linux operating system have released the CoreOS 1068.10.0 stable update, along with new ISO images for all supported platforms. Read more

SUSE Linux and openSUSE Leap to Offer Better Support for ARM Systems Using EFI

The YaST development team at openSUSE and SUSE is reporting on the latest improvements that should be available in the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.2 and SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2 operating systems. Read more

Create modular server-side Java apps direct from mvn modules with diet4j instead of an app server

In the latest release, the diet4j module framework for Java has learned to run modular Java apps using the Apache jsvc daemon (best known from running Tomcat on many Linux distros). If org.example.mydaemon is your top Maven project, all you do is specify it as the root module for your jsvc invocation, and diet4j figures out the dependencies when jsvc starts. An example systemd.service file is available.