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Linux

Exciting Graphics Driver Changes Coming In Linux 3.19

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

With Linux 3.18 likely coming out today, we can begin focusing more of our attention and testing on the code that will become the Linux 3.19 kernel over the weeks ahead. Once again, when it comes to the DRM graphics driver changes, there's lots of exciting improvements.

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MakuluLinux Xfce 7 is Live !

Filed under
GNU
Linux

MakuluLinux Xfce 7 is now Live, it has been a long month for me, but it is finally done and ready for public daily use.

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Budgie: A Lightweight, Chrome OS Inspired, GNOME-Aligned Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The latest new open-source Linux desktop initiative is Budgie, a desktop focused on simplicity. The Budgie desktop is now undergoing possible review for inclusion into Fedora.

Budgie is the desktop environment designed for the Evolve OS Linux distribution. According to its developers, Budgie is "designed with the modern user in mind, it focuses on simplicity and elegance. A huge advantage for the Budgie desktop is that it is not a fork of another project, but rather one written from scratch with integration in mind."

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Antergos Is Working Out Well For Measuring Up Arch Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This past week I've been carrying out a number of system installations using Antergos as an Arch-based distribution with its quick and easy GUI/CLI installer. In seeking somewhat of a stable/sane base of settings and default packages that's easy to reproduce by others on independent systems yet still rolling-release with Arch, I've been happy with Antergos thus far.

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The Linux 3.18 Kernel Brings Many Great Changes

Filed under
Linux

The Linux 3.18 kernel is expected to be released this weekend and with this major update to the kernel are -- as usual -- an exciting number of changes and new features.

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PuzzlePhone: An open-source Project Ara challenger appears

Filed under
Linux
OSS

A Finland-based firm is offering a modular smartphone that's simpler than Google's Project Ara. The open-source device is slated to hit the market in the latter half of 2015.

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Reclaiming the PDF from Adobe Reader

Filed under
GNU
Linux

In October, it was discovered that Adobe had removed the link to download Adobe Reader, its proprietary PDF file viewer, for use with a GNU/Linux operating system.

While it is still possible to install Adobe Reader on GNU/Linux, Adobe's attempts to hide access to the product for certain users is only one example of its systematic neglect of its GNU/Linux user base, and falls in line with many others as a demonstration of the importance of free software--software that no company or developer can neglect or hide. As the Windows and OSX versions of the software were developed through version 11, the GNU/Linux version was long stuck at version nine. For several years the software has lacked important features, security improvements, and support against malware attacks and other intrusions. Yet, by "locking in" Adobe Reader users and making it difficult for them to migrate to a free software PDF viewer, Adobe has, in effect, degraded the power of the PDF as a free document format, a standard the purpose of which is to be implemented by any potential piece of software and to be compatible with all. The company has abandoned the principle of program-agnostic documents, bringing about a lose-lose situation for all.

By being led to rely on the proprietary software for tasks like sharing documents and filling out forms without the option to use a free software reader in its place, entreprises, the public sector, and institutions of higher learning have also fallen victim to this neglect, all as Adobe insidiously seeks to maintain a hold on its market share. Within institutions such as government--institutions that ought not to rely on any proprietary software, to begin with--it is concerning that Adobe Reader has often been taken to be the only option for interacting with PDF files and for communicating with the electorate.

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Open Source: Linux Operating System Introduced in 1991

Filed under
Linux

In the beginning, software was free, something you needed to make the hardware run. Then Microsoft (MSFT) and others demonstrated that people would pay for proprietary code, and for a long while software wasn’t free. But proprietary code was often clunky, and what worked on one kind of computer had to be re-created on others. Soon people realized there was a better way, and software became free again, sort of. Open-source software is essentially software that’s open to the public for tinkering, and over time that tinkering makes the code stronger. Linux, the classic example, is an operating system that’s been so extensively customized and built upon, versions of it now run everything from data centers, PCs, TVs, and cars to your Android smartphone. Companies still charge for apps and services, but much of the technology we use today is based on building blocks that are free and open to the imagination.

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Linux Foundation names Portland's Steve Westmoreland as CIO

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit that oversees the Linux open source computer operating system, added to its Oregon staff this week by hiring Portland's Steve Westmoreland as chief information officer.

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Marines dump Microsoft for Linux OS on Northrop Grumman radar

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Just weeks after Northrop Grumman got approval to begin building a new breed of mobile radar systems for the Marine Corps, the Corps has asked the defense contractor in Linthicum to change the operating system.

The Department of Defense announced a $10.2 million contract modification Wednesday to change the operator command and control software on its G/ATOR radar system Microsoft Windows XP to a Defense Information Systems Agency compliant Linux OS.

Ingrid Vaughan, director of the program, said the change would mean greater compatability for laptop computers used to control the system in the future.

In a statement released Friday, she said Microsoft Windows XP is no longer supported by the software developer and the shift to a DOD approved Linux operating system will reduce both the complexity of the operating system and need for future updates.

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More in Tux Machines

Will New Google Android Live TV Outfox Apple?

Google then rolled out its $35 Chromecast dongle, a streaming device, in mid-2013. Google's new Android TV operating system is expected to make it easier for software developers to move apps from mobile devices to TVs. Read more

Q4OS Is a Windows-Lookalike OS That Now Comes with LXDE and Xfce as Well

Q4OS, a Linux distribution built to offer a similar experience to Windows XP, is now featuring a couple of extra desktop environments that should provide some more options for users who want a different look. Read more

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