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Phones and TIzen

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Linux
  • Are We Near 'Peak Screen Size' for Smartphone Screen Growth? Is 6 Inches Too Big?

    As I was working on the stats for the TomiAhonen Phone Book 2016 (was released last Friday if you missed the blog while on winter vacation), I did my various updates to the numbers. And I added more detail as I tend to do (now there is a separate chart just about the screen size growth over the past decade). And it had me thinking about the screen size issue again. Those who have read my blog for many years remember that three years ago I postulated my hypothesis that 'Screen Size Trumps Everything' and that turned out to be a pretty sharp blog of considerable insights and we saw even Apple finally agree to release its phablet screen size iPhone 6 Plus model etc.. It also predicted a growth in smartphone screen sizes. Now we may have reached the zenith of that evolution path. We are likely near the peak of how far screen sizes for the current form-factor smartphone concepts can grow. It is like my friend Christian Lindholm predicted back in 2007, that the physical dimensions of the gadget work with the human dimensions - our fingers typically - and the other restraints like sizes of our pockets and something a bit bigger than 5 inches was where Christian back then (in 2007 the largest phone screen size was the freshly-released iPhone with its massive 3.5 inches). The most popular premium and mid-range phone models sold today tend to be in that 5 inch size range say between 4.5 and 5.5 inches, and very few sell in any meaningful numbers in the over-6 inch range even though the 'phablet' size screen has now been around for us for five years. We seem to have now discovered the 'sweet spot'. So its time for me to speculate again. I think we have arrived at a kind of at least-temporary plateau and possibly the peak of how far this phone form factor will grow in screen size. We may see NEW form factors (Samsung rumored to give us a foldable screen, that folds like a book to give us twice the screen size in the same pocket size). But lets explore the evolution of the screen size. And good news: I have been drawing PICTURES for us... Smile Isn't that nice

  • Smartphone Game: Millionaire Popular TV Game added to Tizen Store
  • Smartphone App: Good Translator app with Google Translate API released to Tizen Store

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • TPM2 and Linux

    Recently Microsoft started mandating TPM2 as a hardware requirement for all platforms running recent versions of windows. This means that eventually all shipping systems (starting with laptops first) will have a TPM2 chip. The reason this impacts Linux is that TPM2 is radically different from its predecessor TPM1.2; so different, in fact, that none of the existing TPM1.2 software on Linux (trousers, the libtpm.so plug in for openssl, even my gnome keyring enhancements) will work with TPM2. The purpose of this blog is to explore the differences and how we can make ready for the transition.

  • The definitive guide to synclient

    This post describes the synclient tool, part of the xf86-input-synaptics package. It does not describe the various options, that's what the synclient(1) and synaptics(4) man pages are for. This post describes what synclient is, where it came from and how it works on a high level. Think of it as a anti-bus-factor post.

  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided is about to get ~70% better performance with RadeonSI

    Marek sent in a patch for RadeonSI that will look to increase performance of Deus Ex: Mankind Divided [Steam, Feral Store] by around 70%.

    That's incredible, seriously, that's an insanely large improvement for such a heavy game to get. Perhaps once this lands in a stable Mesa version, if it's good enough Feral might be able to officially support the game on AMD.

LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of The Week - Ubuntu MATE 16.10

Filed under
Linux

Ubuntu has been the focus of Linux world for a long time. But, it received a lot of criticism when it shifted to Unity interface. The interface came kind of a shock to many devoted users of the old Ubuntu. This caused many users either to shift to other distributions or flavors of Ubuntu itself. Now, there is a similar story which many new users don’t know about.

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more

4 hot skills for Linux pros in 2017

Filed under
GNU
Linux

One of the problems with becoming a Linux expert is the definition is constantly changing. When I started in the Linux world, to be considered a Linux professional, you had to be able to compile your own kernel. Heck, if you wanted to use Linux on a laptop, you had to compile a custom kernel to even be a user. These days, compiling your own kernel is usually a waste of time. That's not to say it isn't important, but in the open source world we build on the successes of others, and Linux distributions provide us with kernels that work well. Although not always that drastic, the demands on IT professionals change every year.

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Linux Releases: PelicanHPC, Solus, Netrunner

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Ridiculously small Linux build lands with ridiculously few swears

    The latest Linux 4.10-rc2 build nearly didn't happen because L-triptophaniac developers were Christmassing, but Linux Torvalds decided to set it free as a New Year treat.

    Explaining the build, Torvalds wrote that “rc2 is ridiculously and unrealistically small. I almost decided to skip rc2 entirely, but a small little meaningless release every once in a while never hurt anybody”.

  • Linus Torvalds Announces Ridiculously Small Second Linux 4.10 Release Candidate

    The first day of 2017 starts off for Linux users with the release of the second RC (Release Candidate) development version of the upcoming Linux 4.10 kernel, as announced by Linus Torvalds himself.

    As expected, Linux kernel 4.10 entered development two weeks after the release of Linux kernel 4.9, on Christmas Day (December 25, 2016), but don't expect to see any major improvements or any other exciting things in RC2, which comes one week after the release of the first RC, because most of the developers were busy partying.

  • Radeon R9 290 Testing Update With Linux 4.10, AMDGPU-PRO 16.50
  • RadeonSI Patches Boost Deus Ex: MD Performance By ~70%

    Marek Olšák is off to a good start with performance optimizations of the RadeonSI Gallium3D open-source driver stack in 2017.

Ringing in 2017 with 90 hacker-friendly single board computers

Filed under
Android
Linux
OSS

Our New Year’s guide to hacker-friendly single board computers turned up 90 boards, ranging from powerful media playing rigs to power-sipping IoT platforms.

Community backed, open spec single board computers running Linux and Android sit at the intersection between the commercial embedded market and the open source maker community. Hacker boards also play a key role in developing the Internet of Things devices that will increasingly dominate our technology economy in the coming years, from home automation devices to industrial equipment to drones.

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Linux 4.10-rc2

Filed under
Linux

Hey, it's been a really slow week between Christmas Day and New Years
Day, and I am not complaining at all.

It does mean that rc2 is ridiculously and unrealistically small. I
almost decided to skip rc2 entirely, but a small little meaningless
release every once in a while never hurt anybody. So here it is.

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Neptune 4.5.3 Release

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are proud to announce the third Neptune 4.5 service release.

This version comes with the newest updates like Chromium 55 & Icedove 45.5 aswell as an upgraded graphicsstack based on Mesa 13.0.2. Besides that this version comes by default with the LTS Kernel 3.18.45. (Newer 4.4 based kernel releases can be found in our repository)

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Some of the smallest Linux distributions

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A lot of time and digital ink is dedicated to talking about features, new capabilities and ease of use. This week I want to go in another direction and talk about minimal Linux distributions, projects with low resource requirements and small (less than 100MB) installation media. Some people have limited Internet connections and/or lower-end equipment and this week I want to explore some of the distributions which are designed to require as few resources as possible.

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Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed Until February 2, Will Bring Linux 4.8, Newer Mesa

If you've been waiting to upgrade your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system to the 16.04.2 point release, which should have hit the streets a couple of days ago, you'll have to wait until February 2. We hate to give you guys bad news, but Canonical's engineers are still working hard these days to port all the goodies from the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) repositories to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which is a long-term supported version, until 2019. These include the Linux 4.8 kernel packages and an updated graphics stack based on a newer X.Org Server version and Mesa 3D Graphics Library. Read more

Calamares Release and Adoption

  • Calamares 3.0 Universal Linux Installer Released, Drops Support for KPMcore 2
    Calamares, the open-source distribution-independent system installer, which is used by many GNU/Linux distributions, including the popular KaOS, Netrunner, Chakra GNU/Linux, and recently KDE Neon, was updated today to version 3.0. Calamares 3.0 is a major milestone, ending the support for the 2.4 series, which recently received its last maintenance update, versioned 2.4.6, bringing numerous improvements, countless bug fixes, and some long-anticipated features, including a brand-new PythonQt-based module interface.
  • Due to Popular Request, KDE Neon Is Adopting the Calamares Graphical Installer
    KDE Neon maintainer Jonathan Riddell is announcing today the immediate availability of the popular Calamares distribution-independent Linux installer framework on the Developer Unstable Edition of KDE Neon. It would appear that many KDE Neon users have voted for Calamares to become the default graphical installer system used for installing the Linux-based operating system on their personal computers. Indeed, Calamares is a popular installer framework that's being successfully used by many distros, including Chakra, Netrunner, and KaOS.

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