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Linux

Use Linux or Tor? The NSA might just be tracking you

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Linux
Security

But it seems those intent on keeping pesky government agencies out of their online business may well be shooting themselves in the virtual foot.

As documents related to the XKeyscore snooping program reveal, the US's National Security Agency has started focusing its snooping efforts on Linux Journal readers, Tails Linux, and Tor users.

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Managing Linux Using Puppet

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Linux
HowTos

At some point, you probably have installed or configured a piece of software on a server or desktop PC. Since you read Linux Journal, you've probably done a lot of this, as well as developed a range of glue shell scripts, Perl snippets and cron jobs.

Unless you are more disciplined than I was, every server has a unique, hand-crafted version of those config files and scripts. It might be as simple as a backup monitor script, but each still needs to be managed and installed.

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Happy Birthday! Linux turns 25

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Linux

Sometime in 2016 Linux will be 25 years old. Exactly when is a matter of opinion.

We could consider Linux's 25th birthday to be August 25th. That's because on that date in 1991, Linus Torvalds made his announcement to the minix community to let them know that he was working on a modest new OS. He had started the work in April. By October 5th, he felt that his new OS was usable and ready for the community at large.

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UBOS beta 7 makes running TLS-enabled web apps even easier on EC2, Raspberry Pi 3, others, with more apps

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Linux

Linux distro UBOS is out in new beta 7, with lots of new features:

Linux and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux
  • LinuxCon Conference Delves Deep into Open Source, Containers and Virtualization

    The Linux Foundation is again hosting its annual LinuxCon conference which will be held on August 22 – 24 in Toronto, Canada offering the opportunity for developers, sys admins, architects and all types and levels of technical talent to gather together at one event for education, collaboration and problem-solving for the Linux platform.

    The event offers more than 100 sessions ranging from tutorials to deep technical dives and everything in between and 1,000 Linux community members with which to collaborate.

  • The Linux Foundation Welcomes Open Source Experts in Security, Cloud and Mobile Technologies

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration today is announcing six new members are joining the organization: Bitnami, CoSoSys, GigaSpaces, Thundersoft, NXT Foundation and INUIT Foundation - University of Rome Tor Vergata.

  • NVIDIA Posts Patches For Mesa, But Just For Wiring Up An EGL Extension

    It's not often we get to talk about NVIDIA developers making open-source contributions to Mesa... After all, their contributions to the Nouveau driver tend to be limited just to the Nouveau DRM/KMS kernel driver and even there seeing patches from the green giant tend to be very infrequent. The latest Mesa patches from NVIDIA aren't even tied to Nouveau but just for wiring up an EGL extension.

Customizable carrier for OMAP4430 COM has RPi style CSI-2 port

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Linux

Gumstix released a customizable carrier board for its tiny OMAP4430-based DuoVero COMs, featuring touchscreen and Raspberry Pi style CSI-2 camera support.

Gumstix has launched an open-source “Garret 50C” carrier board for its dual-core DuoVero computer-on-module family, the company’s higher-end alternative to its single-core Overo COMs. The board was designed with the company’s online Geppetto DIY design and quick-turn prototype manufacturing service, which customers can use to customize the board.

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Rugged, network oriented module dishes up 12-core QorIQ SoC

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Linux

X-ES announced an “XPedite5850” COM Express Basic Type 5 module that runs Linux on an NXP QorIQ T4240 SoC with 12 e6500 PowerPC cores.

Extreme Engineering Solutions (X-ES) regularly taps NXP (formerly Freescale) QorIQ system-on-chips for its Xpedite SBCs and modules, both the newer ARM-based variety, as in the XPedite6401 and XPedite6370 (QorIQ LS1043A or LS2088A) and the PowerPC-based Xpedite 6101 (QorIQ T2081, T1042, or T1022). The new XPedite5850 COM Express module uses NXP’s highest-end Power Architecture chip, the QorIQ T4240, and appears to be the first COM Express module based on the SoC.

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Greg Kroah-Hartman Gives an Inside Look at the Largest, Fastest Software Project of All

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Linux

What has 21 million lines of code, 4000 contributors, and more changes per day than most software projects have in months, or even years? The Linux kernel, of course. In this video, Greg Kroah-Hartman provides an inside view of how the largest, fastest software project of all absorbs so many changes while maintaining a high level of quality and stability.

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The Pocket C.H.I.P. Is the Handheld Linux Machine I've Been Looking For

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Linux

The variety of ways people have found to cram the palm-sized Raspberry Pi computer inside a handheld device are some of my favorite Pi projects. But those projects are usually expensive, and some even require a 3D printer. The PocketC.H.I.P. isn’t nearly as powerful as a Pi, but it’s still the handheld machine I’ve wanted for a long time. Plus, it’s just $50.

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Kernel Space

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Linux
  • Improving Linux Switchable Graphics support

    All modern laptops have a gpu integrated into their processor (the igpu), some models also have a more powerful dedicated gpu (dgpu), this is called switchable graphics.

    By default all apps will run on the more energy efficient igpu and the OS can choose to switch to the dgpu when more gpu-power is necessary, trading battery time for graphics performance. On most laptops the default gpu can be changed to the dgpu so that everything will always run on the dgpu.

  • Red Hat Is Working To Improve Linux Switchable Graphics

    Hans de Goede of Red Hat has been tasked with making improvements to Linux's switchable graphics support, namely for laptops with integrated and discrete GPUs.

    For years there's been various developers working on Linux switchable graphics and features like DRI PRIME, but to this day the support remains a great deal behind what's offered by Windows and OS X. Hans de Goede is hoping to improve the situation for Fedora, but thanks to Red Hat's workflow, will benefit upstream Linux projects to help other distributions too.

  • Linux-4.4.15-stable Review Missing In Action
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Security Leftovers

10 hot Android smartphones that got price cuts recently

With numerous smartphone getting launched each month, brands always adjust prices to give slightly competitive edge to older smartphone models and also to clear inventories. Here are 10 smartphones that got price cuts recently. Read more

Debian and Ubuntu News

  • Debian Project News - July 29th, 2016
    Welcome to this year's third issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.
  • SteamOS Brewmaster 2.87 Released With NVIDIA Pascal Support
  • Snap interfaces for sandboxed applications
    Last week, we took a look at the initial release of the "portal" framework developed for Flatpak, the application-packaging format currently being developed in GNOME. For comparison, we will also explore the corresponding resource-control framework available in the Snap format developed in Ubuntu. The two packaging projects have broadly similar end goals, as many have observed, but they tend to vary quite a bit in the implementation details. Naturally, those differences are of particular importance to the intended audience: application developers. There is some common ground between the projects. Both use some combination of techniques (namespaces, control groups, seccomp filters, etc.) to restrict what a packaged application can do. Moreover, both implement a "deny by default" sandbox, then provide a supplemental means for applications to access certain useful system resources on a restricted or mediated basis. As we will see, there is also some overlap in what interfaces are offered, although the implementations differ. Snap has been available since 2014, so its sandboxing and resource-control implementations have already seen real-world usage. That said, the design of Snap originated in the Ubuntu Touch project aimed at smartphones, so some of its assumptions are undergoing revision as Snap comes to desktop systems. In the Snap framework, the interfaces that are defined to provide access to system resources are called, simply, "interfaces." As we will see, they cover similar territory to the recently unveiled "portals" for Flatpak, but there are some key distinctions. Two classes of Snap interfaces are defined: one for the standard resources expected to be of use to end-user applications, and one designed for use by system utilities. Snap packages using the standard interfaces can be installed with the snap command-line tool (which is the equivalent of apt for .deb packages). Packages using the advanced interfaces require a separate management tool.
  • Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Reaches End Of Life Today (July 28)
  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Yakkety Yak Gets A Unity HUD-Like Searchable Menu
    MATE HUD, a Unity HUD-like tool that allows searching through an application's menu, was recently uploaded to the official Yakkety Yak repositories, and is available (but not enabled) by default in Ubuntu MATE 16.10.

Tablet review: BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition

As employees have become more and more flexible in recent years thanks to the power and performance of mobile devices, the way we work has changed dramatically. We frequently chop and change between smartphones, tablets and laptops for different tasks, which has led to the growth of the hybrid market – devices such as Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 and Apple’s iPad Pro – that provide the power and functionality of a laptop with the mobility and convenience of a tablet. Read more