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Windows 10 doesn't matter to the future of Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Ugh, here we go again with the Windows versus Linux desktop blather. I hate having to wade through this stuff, but it's necessary because articles like this continue to promote the idea that the desktop is of primary importance to Linux and that simply isn't true. Usage habits have shifted considerably from desktop computers to mobile devices.

Linux will always be around on the desktop, it may or may not have a sizable percentage of market share, but it will always be there as an alternative to Windows and OS X. And Windows 10 (or 11 or 12 or 13) isn't going to change that, no matter what Microsoft does to improve its desktop operating system.

The real action is in mobile devices and in that arena Linux has utterly smashed Windows and Microsoft into oblivion. You see Linux in Android phones and tablets, Chromebooks, Kindle ebook readers and in many other devices. The article grudgingly notes the success of Linux in mobile at the very end but otherwise seems totally focused on a pointless desktop horse race between Linux and Windows.

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LG is working on a webOS SmartWatch

Filed under
Linux

The world's favorite abortive mobile operating system, webOS, refuses to go away quietly. After being open-sourced by HP and then sold off to LG, webOS is now apparently returning to mobile devices in the form of a new LG SmartWatch. A developer website hosted by LG teases a software development kit for a webOS SmartWatch, while the familiar Bean Bird from LG's webOS TVs also shows up, this time supporting a classically styled analog wristwatch.

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Actions have consequences (or: why I'm not fixing Intel's bugs any more)

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Recently, as part of the anti-women #GamerGate campaign[2], a set of awful humans convinced Intel to terminate an advertising campaign because the site hosting the campaign had dared to suggest that the sexism present throughout the gaming industry might be a problem. Despite being awful humans, it is absolutely their right to request that a company choose to spend its money in a different way. And despite it being a dreadful decision, Intel is obviously entitled to spend their money as they wish. But I'm also free to spend my unpaid spare time as I wish, and I no longer wish to spend it doing unpaid work to enable an abhorrently-behaving company to sell more hardware. I won't be working on any Intel-specific bugs. I won't be reverse engineering any Intel-based features[3]. If the backlight on your laptop with an Intel GPU doesn't work, the number of fucks I'll be giving will fail to register on even the most sensitive measuring device.

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Slide Show: 11 Smart Eyewear Devices Running Android or Linux

Filed under
Android
Linux
Gadgets

Google Glass wasn't the first eyewear computer, but it achieved several technological breakthroughs, especially in its sleek, lightweight construction. The much maligned device has spawned a growing industry of head-mounted smart eyegear. Our slide show of 11 Android and Linux eyewear devices includes simple Bluetooth accessories for notifications, full-fledged industrial headgear, sports gear for bikers and skiiers, and even a motorcycle helmet (click Gallery link below).

Like Glass, eight of the 10 other devices listed in our slide show are based on Android, while two -- Laforge's ICIS and Tobii Glasses 2 -- use embedded Linux. Almost all the devices are open for pre-orders at the very least, and most are shipping, although sometimes only in beta form. Several are OEM-focused devices. Glass only recently became publicly available for $1,500, and sales are still controlled by Google, with restrictions in terms of age (18+) and a requirement that you live in the US or UK.

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Atmel revs up Cortex-A5 SoC with video decode, security

Filed under
Android
Linux

Atmel is sampling a Linux supported, Cortex-A5 based SAMA5D4 SoC that bests the earlier SAMA5D3 with new NEON, L2 cache, 720p decode, and security features.

Atmel announced the SAMA5D4 system-on-chip at ARM TechCon 2014, which is underway this week in Santa Clara, Calif. The SAMA5D4, builds upon the foundation of the earlier SAMA5D3 SoC, and similarly uses ARM’s Cortex-A5 processor. It supports Internet of Things (IoT) applications including control panels, communication gateways, and imaging terminals, says Atmel. The SAMA5D4 is supported with an Atmel Xplained development kit, as well as a mainline Linux BSP, with Android support coming in December.

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Learn GNU/Linux the Fun Way

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Interviews

Sometimes a gift just falls in your lap. This month, it came in the form of an e-mail out of the blue from Jared Nielsen, one of two brothers (the other is J.R. Nielsen) who created The Hello World Program, "an educational web series making computer science fun and accessible to all". If it had been just that, I might not have been interested.

But when I looked at it, I saw it was hugely about Linux. And the human story was interesting too. Wrote Jared, "Working in rural Utah with minimal resources, we combine technology and craft to make educational yet entertaining videos and tutorials. Learn to code with our cute and clever puppets." So I said I'd like to interview them, and here's how it went.

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Cumulus Linux: First Impressions

Filed under
Linux

One company looking to benefit from this trend is Cumulus Networks. Cumulus does not produce or sell hardware, only a network operating system: Cumulus Linux. The Debian-based OS is built to run on whitebox hardware you can purchase from a number of partner Original Device Manufacturers (ODMs). (Their hardware compatability list includes a number of 10GE and 40GE switch models from different vendors.)

Cumulus Linux is, as the name implies, Linux. There is no "front end" CLI as on, for example, Arista platforms. Upon login you are presented with a Bash terminal and all the standard Linux utilities (plus a number of not-so-standard bits). Like any OS, Cumulus handles interactions with the underlying hardware and among processes.

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Steam Linux Usage Rose 0.1% During September

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux rose to 1.16% while Windows dropped 0.12% down to 95.35% and OS X usage rose 0.05% to 3.42%. When it comes to Linux hardware status for the month, Linux users were mostly running with around 3GB of RAM, 77% used Intel processors, 1920 x 1080 was the most commn display size, and Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS 64-bit was the most popular distribution.

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Fedora Workstation Progress Report (Wayland and more)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat

Wayland in Fedora Workstation 21 is also an important milestone as it exemplifies the new development philosophy we are embarking on. Fedora has for a long time been known to be a linux distribution where a lot of new pieces become available first. The problem here is that it has also given Fedora bit of a reputation for being not as dependable as some other distributions or operating systems, which has kept a lot of people away from Fedora that I think would be inclined to use it otherwise.

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Linux evolution

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We’re picking our best Linux distributions for 2014. It’s always an odd task and this year we’ve decided to take the chance to delve into the genus behind the distros that we use every day. We’ve been inspired by the GNU/Linux Distribution Timeline at http://futurist.se/gldt which we’ve mentioned before, and decided that we’d explore why the major families in the GNU/Linux world sprang up and how they’ve evolved over the years.

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More in Tux Machines

WE’RE HOSTING AN OPENDAYLIGHT HACKFEST IN JAPAN!

The OpenDaylight Project has quickly grown to become a global community, with more than 250 contributors working to advance open SDN and NFV from all corners of the world. This includes 11 ambassadors worldwide and OpenDaylight User Groups (ODLUG) in six cities across three countries. We are excited to host our first OpenDaylight HackFest in Japan in less than two weeks, and the good news is that it’s free to attend. Read more

Debian Project mourns the loss of Peter Miller

The Debian Project recently learned that it has lost a member of its community. Peter Miller died on July 27th after a long battle with leukemia. Peter was a relative newcomer to the Debian project, but his contributions to Free and Open Source Software goes back the the late 1980s. Peter was significant contributor to GNU gettext as well as being the main upstream author and maintainer of other projects that ship as part of Debian, including, but not limited to srecord, aegis and cook. Peter was also the author of the paper "Recursive Make Considered Harmful". The Debian Project honours his good work and strong dedication to Debian and Free Software. The contributions of Peter will not be forgotten, and the high standards of his work will continue to serve as an inspiration to others. Read more

A Seat at the Big Kids’ Table at Ohio LinuxFest

Ohio LinuxFest isn’t just another excuse to travel. It’s a means for us to fulfill ourselves, and to get honest, tangible feedback for what we do and for what others are doing. It’s a place where ideas are sounded, bent, crumpled and turned until they either come out of the crucible perfect…or useless. That’s what our gatherings are about. They are about excitement and promise. They​ are about making sure the next generation has a real chance to put the first human footprint on Mars. They are a chance to insure they have the tools and the curiosity to take something apart and then make it better. This next generation will cure diabetes; they will make cancer an inconvenience and not a death sentence. Read more

OpenStack Juno is out, Debian (and Ubuntu Trusty ports) packages ready

This is just a quick announce: Debian packages for Juno are out. In fact, they were ready the day of the release, on the 16th of October. I uploaded it all (to Experimental) the same day, literally a few hours after the final released was git tagged. But I had no time to announce it. This week-end, I took the time to do an Ubuntu Trusty port, which I also publish (it’s just a mater of rebuilding all, and it should work out of the box). Here are the backports repositories. For Wheezy: deb http://archive.gplhost.com/debian juno-backports main deb http://archive.gplhost.com/debian juno main For trusty: deb http://archive.gplhost.com/debian trusty-juno-backports main Read more