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Linux Graphics

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  • Last Minute XWayland Improvements For X.Org Server 1.19, Including Pointer Warping

    A number of last minute XWayland improvements/fixes landed today in the Git code-base ahead of this month's X.Org Server 1.19 release.

    XWayland changes hitting the xorg-server Git today include creating a secondary input device to be used for pointer warping/locking, pointer warp emulation, touch fixes, and other xwayland changes.

  • 75 Patches Queued For Gallium3D's Nine State Tracker
  • RADV Radeon Vulkan Driver Planned For Merging Tomorrow
  • Here's An Ubuntu/Debian Kernel To Play With AMDGPU On GCN 1.0/1.1 GPUs

    If you have a GCN 1.0 Southern Islands or GCN 1.1 Sea Islands graphics card and have been wanting to play with the experimental AMDGPU kernel DRM driver as an alternative to the Radeon DRM driver, here's an opportunity for Ubuntu/Debian users.

    With the forthcoming Linux 4.9 kernel is the new experimental Kconfig option to enable GCN 1.0 GPU support in AMDGPU, complementing the existing GCN 1.1 build-time option for turning on support there in this more modern DRM driver. In case you missed my tests this week of the experimental functionality in AMDGPU DRM, see AMDGPU vs. Radeon GCN 1.0/1.1 Performance On Linux 4.9 DRM-Next and Regressed R9 290 Isn't Affected By Issue When Using AMDGPU DRM Driver.

XFS File-System Updates For The Linux 4.9 Kernel

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Dave Chinner has submitted his XFS file-system updates for the Linux 4.9 kernel. This time around most of the changes are internal to the open-source file-system rather than boasting new end-user features.

XFS for Linux 4.9 has improvements to the iomap-based DAX infrastructure, iomap fixes and changes, more efficient XFS delayed allocation using iomap, preparation patches for upcoming reflink support, and other prep changes and internal improvements.

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More changes in Linux 4.9:


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  • Pre-Order Gear S3 Classic and Frontier Smartwatch in the UK

    The latest Tizen based smartwatch, the Gear S3, has been launched at the end of August. This gear device builds on the hit features of the Gear S2, the circular screen and rotating bezel immediately come to mind, and adds more features for the fashion and sports conscious amongst us.

  • Samsung Z2 is to be Launched in Kenya Today

    We’ve been following the launch of the Samsung Z2 closely, as you would expect from Tizen Experts, and we knew that Kenya was the next market to be graced by the Z2 and its 4G capabilities. Well it looks like today is the day as Samsung has been sending out Press Invites for the event over the last few days.

  • Xender File Transfer Sharing App Launched on the Tizen Store

    Many of our readers have been waiting for Xender, a file transfer & sharing app, to be released on the Tizen Store and today it finally has. Do you need to transfer a file between mobile phones or between your phone and the pc? This is what Xender is designed to do and it does it quite well. The app boasts at being the fastest all-in-one file transfer and sharing app!

  • SmartHome prototype using ARTIK Cloud and Particle Photon

    Samsung and had announced an ‘IOT challenge Using ARTIK Cloud” a couple of months ago in order to bring the maker and developer community on board to samsung’s cloud platform. The deadlines for submissions of project ideas are about to close in 5 days at the time of writing. A huge list of entries have been flooding the doors of and Samsung ever since the contest was announced.

Linux/FOSS Events: FOSSCON, FOSS Wave, Fedora, systemd.conf

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    This post is long past due, but I figured it is better late than never. At the start of the year, I set a goal to get more involved with attending and speaking at conferences. Through work, I was able to attend the Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE) in Pasadena, CA in January. I also got to give a talk at O'Relly's Open Source Convention (OSCON) in Austin, TX in May. However, I really wanted to give a talk about my experience contributing in the Ubuntu community.

    José Antonio Rey encouraged me to submit the talk to FOSSCON. While I've been aware of FOSSCON for years thanks to my involvement with the freenode IRC network (which has had a reference to FOSSCON in the /motd for years), I had never actually attended it before. I also wasn't quite sure how I would handle traveling from San Francisco, CA to Philadelphia, PA. Regardless, I decided to go ahead and apply.

    Fast forward a few weeks, and imagine my surprise when I woke up to an email saying that my talk proposal was accepted. People were actually interested in me and what I had to say. I immediately began researching flights. While they weren't crazy expensive, they were still more money than I was comfortable spending. Luckily, José had a solution to this problem as well; he suggested applying for funding through the Ubuntu Community Donations fund. While I've been an Ubuntu Member for over 8 years, I've never used this resource before. However, I was happy when I received a very quick approval.

  • FOSS Wave: Bangalore at UVCE

    It was another lazy Saturday with a rare sight of empty Bangalore roads. This FOSS Wave event in Bangalore had been in planning for almost a month. Finally, here we were on September 10th, 2016 in front of the almost a century old structure of University Visvesvaraya College of Engineering.

    Five speakers reached the venue by 9:30am. We were to talk in two different sessions starting from 10:30am until 4:00pm on the following topics.

  • Fedora Join Meeting 26 September 2016 - Summary
  • systemd.conf 2016 is Over Now!

    A few days ago systemd.conf 2016 ended, our second conference of this kind. I personally enjoyed this conference a lot: the talks, the atmosphere, the audience, the organization, the location, they all were excellent!

    I'd like to take the opportunity to thanks everybody involved. In particular I'd like to thank Chris, Daniel, Sandra and Henrike for organizing the conference, your work was stellar!

    I'd also like to thank our sponsors, without which the conference couldn't take place like this, of course. In particular I'd like to thank our gold sponsor, Red Hat, our organizing sponsor Kinvolk, as well as our silver sponsors CoreOS and Facebook. I'd also like to thank our bronze sponsors Collabora, OpenSUSE, Pantheon, Pengutronix, our supporting sponsor Codethink and last but not least our media sponsor Linux Magazin. Thank you all!

Security News

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  • Security advisories for Wednesday
  • 10 basic linux security measures everyone should be doing

    Akin to locking your doors and closing your windows there’s some really basic things everyone should be doing with their Linux installs (This is of course written from a Fedora viewpoint, but I think this pretty much applies to all computer OSes).

  • Johnson & Johnson Warns Insulin Pump Owners They Could Be Killed By Hackers

    Initially the lack of security on "smart" Internet of Things devices was kind of funny as companies rushed to make a buck and put device security on the back burner. And while hackable tea kettles and refrigerators that leak your Gmail credentials just seem kind of stupid on the surface, people are slowly realizing that at scale -- we're introducing millions of new attack vectors into homes and businesses annually. Worse, compromised devices are now being used as part of massive new DDoS attacks like the one we recently saw launched against Brian Krebs.

    Unfortunately, companies that service the medical industry also decided a few years ago that it would be a good idea to connect every-damn-thing to networks without first understanding the security ramifications of the decision. As a result, we're seeing a rise in not only the number of ransomware attacks launched on hospitals, but a spike in hackable devices like pacemakers that could mean life and death for some customers.

  • EFF Asks Court to Block U.S. From Prosecuting Security Researcher For Detecting and Publishing Computer Vulnerabilities

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) asked a court Thursday for an order that would prevent the government from prosecuting its client, security researcher Matthew Green, for publishing a book about making computer systems more secure.

    Green is writing a book about methods of security research to recognize vulnerabilities in computer systems. This important work helps keep everyone safer by finding weaknesses in computer code running devices critical to our lives—electronic devices, cars, medical record systems, credit card processing, and ATM transactions. Green’s aim is to publish research that can be used to build more secure software.

  • Malta unveils Cyber Security Strategy

    The government of Malta has unveiled a National Cyber Security Strategy. The strategy provides the legal context to defend the country’s computer networks infrastructure and its users from threats.

  • Mirai “internet of things” malware from Krebs DDoS attack goes open source

    Last week, we wrote about a DDoS attack on well-known investigative cybercrime journalist Brian Krebs.

    To explain.

    A DDoS attack is an aggressive sort of DoS attack, where DoS is short for denial of service.

    A DoS is a bit like getting into the queue at the station to buy a ticket for the next train, only to have a time-waster squeeze in front of you and slow you down.

    By the time the miscreant has asked, innocently enough, about the different sorts of ticket available, and whether it costs extra to take a bicycle, and how much longer it would take if he were to change trains in Manchester, only to walk off without buying a ticket at all…

    …you’ve watched your train arrive, load up with passengers, and depart without you.

    A DDoS attack is worse: it’s short for distributed denial of service attack, and it’s much the same thing as a DoS, except that the trouble-stirrer doesn’t show up on his own.

  • Linux systems susceptible to crashes from tweet sized command
  • Linux 4.8 Debuts - But Maybe It Shouldn't Have

    The Linux 4.8.0 kernel was officially release on October 2, becoming the fifth kernel release so far in 2016. The Linux 4.7 kernel was released on July 24.

    As opposed to all the other kernel releases this year (and in fact in contrast to all kernel releases since 2.6) Torvalds really wasn't happy about this one, though the source of his displeasure didn't become apparent until after the release.

    "So the last week was really quiet, which maybe means that I could probably just have skipped rc8 after all," Torvalds wrote in in his Linux 4.8 release announcement. "Oh well, no real harm done."

    A day later on October 3, Torvalds addmits that he shouldn't have merged a late set of updates from kernel developer Andrew Morton.

Linux is a new frontier for young developer

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When I was 17 years old, I started using Linux because I wanted a desktop that resembled my brother-in-law's Gentoo laptop, which used the KDE environment. Instead, I got the now-nostalgic brown and orange GNOME 2 environment because I'd installed Ubuntu. (Ubuntu has since changed its color palette.)

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i.MX6 UL COM has a carrier board with Raspberry Pi style expansion

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The Armadeus “Opos6UL” COM runs Linux on an i.MX6 UL SoC, and has eMMC, optional wireless, extended temp support, and a carrier board with RPi-style I/O.

French embedded manufacturer Armadeus Systems, which last year shipped an APF6_SP computer-on-module with an i.MX6 and a Cyclone V GX FPGA, has now unveiled a more modest, but similarly Linux- and NXP-based COM aimed at IoT applications. The i.MX6 UltraLite (UL) based Opos6UL is designed for industrial products like IoT gateways, medical devices, small HMI, and autonomous robotics.

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Linux Lite 3.2 Enters Beta, Now Plays Nice with Other GNU/Linux Distributions

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Linux Lite creator Jerry Bezencon informs Softpedia today, October 5, 2016, about the release and immediate availability of the Beta of his upcoming Linux Lite 3.2 Ubuntu-based operating system.

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More in Tux Machines

TheSSS 20.0 Server-Oriented Linux Distro Ships with Linux Kernel 4.4.17, PHP 5.6

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki informs Softpedia today, October 26, 2016, about the release and immediate availability of version 20.0 of his server-oriented TheSSS (The Smallest Server Suite) GNU/Linux distribution. Read more

Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Daily Build ISO Images Are Now Available for Download

Now that the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system is officially open for development, the first daily build ISO images have published in the usual places for early adopters and public testers. Read more

Today in Techrights

OSS Leftovers

  • Chain Releases Open Source Blockchain Solution for Banks
    Chain, a San Francisco-based Blockchain startup, launched the Chain Core Developer Edition, which is a distributed ledger infrastructure built for banks and financial institutions to utilize the Blockchain technology in mainstream finance. Similar to most cryptocurrency networks like Bitcoin, developers and users are allowed to run their applications and platforms on the Chain Core testnet, a test network sustained and supported by leading institutions including Microsoft and the Initiative for Cryptocurrency and Contracts (IC3), which is operated by Cornell University, UC Berkeley and University of Illinois.
  • Netflix Upgrades its Powerful "Chaos Monkey" Open Cloud Utility
    Few organizations have the cloud expertise that Netflix has, and it may come as a surprise to some people to learn that Netflix regularly open sources key, tested and hardened cloud tools that it has used for years. We've reported on Netflix open sourcing a series of interesting "Monkey" cloud tools as part of its "simian army," which it has deployed as a series satellite utilities orbiting its central cloud platform. Netflix previously released Chaos Monkey, a utility that improves the resiliency of Software as a Service by randomly choosing to turn off servers and containers at optimized tims. Now, Netflix has announced the upgrade of Chaos Monkey, and it's worth checking in on this tool.
  • Coreboot Lands More RISC-V / lowRISC Code
    As some early post-Coreboot 4.5 changes are some work to benefit fans of the RISC-V ISA.
  • Nextcloud Advances with Mobile Moves
    The extremely popular ownCloud open source file-sharing and storage platform for building private clouds has been much in the news lately. CTO and founder of ownCloud Frank Karlitschek resigned from the company a few months ago. His open letter announcing the move pointed to possible friction created as ownCloud moved forward as a commercial entity as opposed to a solely community focused, open source project. Karlitschek had a plan, though. He is now out with a fork of ownCloud called Nextcloud, and we've reported on strong signs that this cloud platform has a bright future. In recent months, the company has continued to advance Nextcloud. Along with Canonical and Western Digital, the partners have launched an Ubuntu Core Linux-based cloud storage and Internet of Things device called Nextcloud Box, which we covered here. Now, Nextcloud has moved forward with some updates to its mobile strategy. Here are details.
  • Using Open Source for Data
    Bryan Liles, from DigitalOcean, explains about many useful open source big data tools in this eight minute video. I learned about Apache Mesos, Apache Presto, Google Kubernetes and more.