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Become an Arch Power User with Pacli and PacUI

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Before I introduce you to these applications, let me explain what they are and why you may find them useful.

Both of these applications are designed to help you install packages on Arch and Arch-based Linux distros (both from the repos and from the Arch User Repository). They are also designed to fix some system errors. Both of them run in the terminal and both give you access to complex commands with the tap of a key.

In terms of usability, they stand somewhere between using pacman (Arch’s package manager, generally used from the terminal) and Pamac (the graphical frontend for pacman).

For some, pacman (and other terminal package managers) are difficult to use because they don’t know all of the possible commands. The man is a couple keyboard strokes away, but it can be difficult to understand at times. On the other hand, when you use Pamac, you might have to search through a number of menus to find what you are looking for.

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Linux Kernel: Linux 4.16, Linux 4.17, Mir, mesa and LF Working for AT&T

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Some Of The Best Additions In Linux 4.16

    The Linux 4.16 kernel is hopefully being released this Sunday, marking the end to another busy kernel development cycle. We have already written dozens of articles about changes to be found with Linux 4.16 and benchmarks, while here is a quick recap of what makes Linux 4.16 special.

  • Seven Reasons To Already Get Excited For Linux 4.17, Especially For AMD/Radeon Users
  • Mir 0.31.1 Released With Various Wayland Fixes

    Another minor update to Mir has arrived ahead of next month's Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver" release.

    Mir 0.31.1 takes care of some warnings emitted now by GCC 8, a few minor fixes, and then is mostly focused on Wayland fixes.

  • More Intel OpenGL 4.6 SPIR-V Code Lands In Mesa 18.1 Git

    It looks like we're getting quite close to finally having OpenGL 4.6 in mainline Mesa.

    Igalia developers that have been assisting the Intel OTC crew on OpenGL 4.6 support for the i965 GL driver have landed their latest round of SPIR-V patches. Solely left blocking OpenGL 4.6 for Intel (and RadeonSI) has been the ARB_gl_spirv / ARB_spirv_extensions OpenGL extensions for allowing the SPIR-V IR to be ingested by the OpenGL drivers for greater cross-operability with Vulkan. These latest patches now in Mesa 18.1-devel are landing i965 SPIR-V bits.

  • LF Networking Gets Ambitious About Open Harmonization

    Building on significant momentum in the networking space, the Linux Foundation's networking arm is getting even more ambitious, announcing a move to harmonize its open source networking efforts with those of adjacent ecosystems including containers and cloud-native efforts, edge computing, network operating systems for white boxes and AI/deep learning.

    The LF Networking Fund (LFN) today made a series of announcements including the launch of DANOS, an open network operating system for white boxes and switches that brings together existing projects such as Free Range Routing and dNOS, and creates an "uber" operating system for white boxes that should speed their commercialization, said Arpit Joshipura, general manager of networking for the Linux Foundation.

  • AT&T to Deploy More than 60,000 White Box Routers

    AT&T on Sunday detailed its plans to use open hardware designs as the carrier virtualizes its network on the road to 5G.

    The company said it will deploy more than 60,000 “white box” routers in cell towers across the U.S. over the next several years — a transition from traditional proprietary routers to open hardware that can be upgraded more quickly.

    “White box represents a radical realignment of the traditional service provider model,” said Andre Fuetsch, CTO and president of AT&T Labs, in a statement. “We’re no longer constrained by the capabilities of proprietary silicon and feature roadmaps of traditional vendors. We’re writing open hardware specifications for these machines, and developing the open source software that powers these boxes.”

LightNVM Getting Open-Channel 2.0 Support For Linux 4.17

Filed under
Linux

LightNVM patches are called for pulling into the Linux kernel's block layer that would land for the Linux 4.17 kernel and provide Open-Channel 2.0 support.

The Open-Channel SSD 2.0 specification was ratified in January by the LightNVM group. As a reminder, LightNVM / Open-Channel is a specification for extending the NVMe specification whereby the solid-state drive exposes its internal parallelism and lets the host operating system determine data placement and I/O scheduling rather than the SSD itself. Open-Channel SSDs aim for better I/O isolation, predictable latency, and better drive management.

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Also: Mesa 17.3.8 Is Being Prepared With Another Dozen Fixes

Sailfish OS at MWC 2018: A Wrap-up!

Filed under
Linux

Every year for the past 6 years we have attended Mobile World Congress alongside our community, bringing Sailfish OS to so many people’s attention by showing off new devices running the OS. We host press events packed with journalists, to illustrate to everyone how this duopoly of mobile operating systems is playing out and there is room for change. This year was no different and we brought in many new believers into the world of the only independent and alternative mobile operating system.

There were articles and event coverage on publishers like Engadget, Techcrunch, NDTV and many more major websites and publications that wrote about our adventure, latest news and how we are on our path to capture different parts of a market which is thirsty for what we have to provide.

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Meet OpenAuto, an Android Auto emulator for Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Android
Linux

In 2015, Google introduced Android Auto, a system that allows users to project certain apps from their Android smartphones onto a car's infotainment display. Android Auto's driver-friendly interface, with larger touchscreen buttons and voice commands, aims to make it easier and safer for drivers to control navigation, music, podcasts, radio, phone calls, and more while keeping their eyes on the road. Android Auto can also run as an app on an Android smartphone, enabling owners of older-model vehicles without modern head unit displays to take advantage of these features.

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Mini-ITX dev kit expands upon new i.MX8M module

Filed under
Linux

Intrinsyc announced a Mini-ITX development kit for a wireless-enabled “Open-X 8M SOM” module that runs Linux or Android 8.0 on a quad-core i.MX8M SoC.

Intrinsyc announced the Open-X 8M SOM a month ago and has now followed up with a Mini-ITX form factor Open-X 8M Development Kit built around the module. The kit includes a GbE port, dual USB 3.0 ports, M2 expansion, and more.

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Linux-driven modules and SBC tap i.MX8, i.MX8M, and iMX8X

Filed under
Linux

Phytec is prepping three PhyCore COMs based on NXP’s Cortex-A53 based i.MX8M, its -A53 and -A72 equipped i.MX8 Quad, and its -A35 based i.MX8X. Also up: an SBC based on the i.MX8M module.

Phytec has posted product pages for three PhyCore modules, all of which support Linux and offer a -40 to 85°C temperature range. The three modules, which employ three different flavors of i.MX8, include a phyCORE-i.MX 8X COM, which is the first product we’ve seen that uses the dual- or quad-core Cortex-A35 i.MX8X.

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My Linux Workstation Environment in 2018

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I’ve been wanting to make another list of the apps on my workstation since the last one but I couldn’t because I was switching between my Linux Mint and Ubuntu PCs on an almost daily basis. Now, I have settled on using one PC to work and let go of the other so I can dive right into the topic.

My distro of choice is – you guessed it, Ubuntu. I run 17.10 and am waiting to see what 18.04 will officially bring when it is released in April. “Why 17.10 and not 16.04 LTS?“, I hear you ask. Well, I have always been one to test Ubuntu’s builds and it includes the new shell, so heaven yeah!

It wouldn’t be resourceful to list every single installation on my PC so my list will regard the apps that I use the most, especially for my web development and writing jobs. For my design gigs, I mainly use a Mac and easy-to-use online tools whenever I’m away from home.

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Also: Librem laptop orders now shipping within a week

Why Classrooms Are Apple, Google and Microsoft's Next Big Battleground

Filed under
Linux
Google
Microsoft
Mac

Google’s Chromebooks accounted for 59.6% of mobile computing shipments in the kindergarten through 12th grade market in the fourth quarter of 2017, according to Futuresource Consulting. By comparison, Windows accounted for 25.6% and iOS comprised 10.6% of shipments.

Among the reasons tech giants are scrambling to get their gadgets into schools: It’s a big business opportunity. The education technology market is expected to reach $252 billion by 2020, according to a report published by education-focused technology conference host EdTechXGlobal and advisory firm IBIS Capital. But there’s potential upside even after students leave the classroom and turn into fully-fledged consumers, too. “It gets people using your technology young,” says Avi Greengart, research director for consumer platforms and devices for GlobalData. “The hope is that they stick with it.”

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