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Linux Kernel 4.14 Now Ready for Mass Deployments as First Point Release Debuts

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Linux

Renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman announced today the Linux 4.14.1 kernel, the first point release of the Linux 4.14 kernel series, which is the first to be supported for the next six years. The Linux 4.14.1 kernel is marked as "stable" on the kernel.org website, giving the green light to OS developers to add it to their repositories.

Arch Linux developers have already pushed the Linux 4.14.1 kernel to the "Testing" repositories, for early adopters, so we may soon see a rebase of the operating system on Linux kernel 4.14, which brings major new features like support for AMD Secure Memory Encryption, Heterogeneous Memory Management to support upcoming GPUs, and bigger memory limits in x86 hardware.

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LibreELEC Embedded Linux OS Now Compatible with Windows 10 Fall Creators Update

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Linux

The LibreELEC 8.2.1 update is based on the latest Kodi 17.6 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center software and it mostly patches some Samba (SMB) "file exists" share errors on Windows 10 Fall Creators Update by updating the protocol to Samba 4.6.10, implementing SMB client options for minimum SMB protocol and an SMB legacy security option with NTLMv1, and disabling SPNEGO.

"LibreELEC 8.2.x includes changes that allow the Kodi SMB client and our embedded Samba server to support SMB2/3 connections; deprecating SMB1 to improve security and performance. This is necessary to cope with changes Microsoft introduced in the Windows 10 ‘Fall Creators Update’ to resolve SMB1 security issues," explained the developers.

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Ubuntu Boot Times From Linux 4.6 To 4.15 Kernels

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

It's been a while since last doing any Linux boot speed comparisons while this morning I have some numbers to share when looking at the boot performance from the Linux 4.6 kernel through Linux 4.15 Git to see how it's changed over time,

These tests were being done using a Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon notebook using a mature Intel Broadwell CPU. Linux 4.6 through 4.15 Git was chosen since that's as far back as the mainline kernel would work with this Ubuntu 17.10 user-space. Linux 4.5 and older would fail to boot.

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7 tools for analyzing performance in Linux with bcc/BPF

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Linux

A new technology has arrived in Linux that can provide sysadmins and developers with a large number of new tools and dashboards for performance analysis and troubleshooting. It's called the enhanced Berkeley Packet Filter (eBPF, or just BPF), although these enhancements weren't developed in Berkeley, they operate on much more than just packets, and they do much more than just filtering. I'll discuss one way to use BPF on the Fedora and Red Hat family of Linux distributions, demonstrating on Fedora 26.

BPF can run user-defined sandboxed programs in the kernel to add new custom capabilities instantly. It's like adding superpowers to Linux, on demand. Examples of what you can use it for include:

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Mesa 17.3 RC5 and Early Stages of Linux 4.15

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • mesa 17.3.0-rc5

    The fifth release candidate for Mesa 17.3.0 is now available. This is the last planned release candidate before the final release.

    We still have a couple of regressions in our tracker [1] although I'm anticipating for those to be resolved by EOW.

  • Mesa 17.3-RC5 Released, Official Mesa 3D Update Expected By Next Week

    The Mesa 17.3 release game is in overtime but it should be wrapping up in the days ahead.

    Emil Velikov of Collabora announced the Mesa 17.3-RC5 release candidate this morning. He anticipates it being the last release candidate, but there still are a few blocker bugs open. As of writing there still are 4 bugs open with one pertaining to Gallium3D Softpipe and the others being Intel driver issues.

  • Extra KVM Changes For Linux 4.15 Bring UMIP Support, AMD SEV Changes Delayed

    As some additional work past the KVM changes for Linux 4.15 submitted last week, a few more feature items have been queued.

    The second batch of Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) updates sent in today for Linux 4.15 include ARM GICv4 support, x86 bug fixes, the AMD VFIO NFT performance fix, and x86 guest UMIP support. Landing already with Linux 4.15 is Intel UMIP capabilities for User-Mode Instruction Prevention to prevent certain instructions from being executed if the ring level is greater than zero. This latest KVM pull update adds this UMIP support to its space for both real and emulated guests.

  • AMD EPYC Is Running Well On Linux 4.15

    Of the many changes coming for Linux 4.15, as detailed this weekend Radeon GPU and AMD CPU customers have a lot to be thankful for with this new kernel update currently in development. Here are some initial benchmarks of the Linux 4.15 development kernel using an AMD EPYC 7601 32-core / 64-thread setup.

    When it comes to EPYC in Linux 4.15, the kernel side-bits have landed for Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV), CPU temperature monitoring support now working, and improved NUMA node balancing.

LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.2.1 MR

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

LibreELEC 8.2.1 is a maintenance release that includes Kodi 17.6. It also resolves a minor time-zone issue after recent daylight saving changes, a resume from suspend issue with the Apple IR driver, and it provides two new SMB client configuration options in Kodi settings. You can now set a minimum SMB protocol version to prevent prevent SMB1 from ever being used, and a ‘legacy security’ option forces weak authentication to resolve issues seen with the USB sharing functions on some older router/NAS devices. If updating to LibreELEC 8.2 for the first time PLEASE READ THE RELEASE NOTES below here before posting issues in the forums as there are disruptive changes to Lirc, Samba, and Tvheadend.

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LiFT Scholarship Recipients Advance Open Source Around the World

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Linux
OSS

Fifteen people from 13 different countries have received Linux Foundation Training Scholarships (LiFT) in the category of Linux Newbies. This year, 27 people received scholarships across all categories — the most ever awarded by the Foundation.

Now in its seventh year, the program awards training scholarships to current and aspiring IT professionals worldwide who may not otherwise have the means for specialized training. The Foundation has awarded 75 scholarships worth more than $168,000 since the program began.

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Linux Containers vs Virtual Machines

Filed under
Linux
Server

Ever since containers on Linux became popular, determining the difference between Linux containers and virtual machines has become trickier. This article will provide you with the details to understand the differences between Linux containers and virtual machines.

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Linux gizmo indexes photos and videos for visual recognition search

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Pimloc’s “Pholio” runs Linux on an Nvidia Tegra, and provides offline storage and search of images and video using visual and face recognition.

Digital imaging has lived up to its promise of making it easier to take more images more quickly, but the promise that it would make it easier to find those images has fallen short. Unless you spend time with an image management package and apply tags to each and every photo, it’s a pain to try to find specific images or groups of images. A new Kickstarter project called Pholio promises to skip the prep work and use visual recognition technology to quickly locate any image or video you seek.

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6-Way Enterprise Focused Linux Distribution Comparison With An Intel Core i9, Dual Xeon Gold Systems

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Linux

Here's our latest Linux distribution comparison with this time looking at the out-of-the-box performance of six Linux distributions while running a range of enterprise/workstation-focused benchmarks while using two systems. One system is a high-end Core i9 7980XE desktop system and the other a Tyan 1U Xeon Scalable server with dual Xeon Gold 6138 processors.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Radeon Benchmarks, New Games, and CrossOver 17

  • AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 vs. RADV/RadeonSI Radeon Linux Gaming Performance
    With today's AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 Linux driver release alongside the Radeon Software Adrenalin Driver for Windows users, it's significant in a few ways. First and foremost, AMD has stuck to their word of the past two years and is now able to open-source their official Vulkan Linux driver. When it comes to AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 itself you are now able to mix-and-match driver components to choose what pieces you want of AMD's somewhat complicated driver make-up. Additionally, their OpenGL/Vulkan drivers in 17.50 have some new feature capabilities. So with that said here's a fresh look at how the AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 professional driver performance compares to the latest open-source RadeonSI OpenGL and RADV Vulkan drivers.
  • The End Is Nigh for Linux gamers is now out of beta on Steam
    Did you get a little worried at the start of that headline? Fret not, as it's about the game 'The End Is Nigh' and it's now out of beta on Steam for Linux.
  • The GOG winter sale is on, you can grab Grim Fandango Remastered for free
  • Run Your Favorite Windows Apps and Games Directly on Your Mac or Linux OS
    It’s almost 2018, and for some reason there still exists an obnoxious barrier between Windows, Mac, and Linux operating systems when it comes to running apps and playing games. CrossOver 17 for Linux was designed to break that tedious barrier down, by allowing you to run your favorite Windows apps and games directly on your Mac or Linux computer, and it’s available for over 50% off at just $19.

Graphics: NVIDIA and AMD

  • NVIDIA Pushes Out CUDA 9.1 With Compiler Optimizations, Volta Enhancements & More
    AMD isn't the only one busy with GPU software updates today but NVIDIA has issued CUDA 9.1 as their first feature update to the CUDA 9 compute platform.
  • Happy Holidays: AMD Finally Pushing Out Open-Source Vulkan Driver
    Ahead of the Vulkan 1.0 debut nearly two years ago, we heard that for AMD's Vulkan Linux driver it was initially going to be closed-source and would then be open-sourced once ready. At the time it sounded like something that would be opened up six months or so, but finally that milestone is being reached! Ahead of Christmas, AMD is publishing the source code to their official Vulkan Linux driver.
  • The Feature Differences Now Between AMD's Two OpenGL & Two Vulkan Linux Drivers
    For modern AMD graphics cards there are two OpenGL drivers and two Vulkan drivers available to Linux users/gamers that support the same modern AMD GPUs, not counting the older AMD Linux drivers, etc. Here's a rundown now on how those drivers compare. With AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 now allowing you to mix and match driver components and AMD finally open-sourcing their official Vulkan driver, the scene may be even more confusing about which AMD Linux driver(s) to use depending upon your use-case.
  • AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 Now Bundles Open-Source Components, Lets You Mix & Match Drivers
    There's more Radeon Linux excitement today beyond AMD finally open-sourcing their Vulkan driver. Coming out today is the AMDGPU-PRO 17.50 driver that bundles in the open-source RADV and RadeonSI drivers too, in letting you "mix and match" the driver components you want for your system.

End of Fedora 27 Modular Server

  • Fedora 27 Server classic release after all — and Modularity goes back to the drawing board
    You may remember reading about plans for Fedora 27 Server. The working group decided not to release that at the same time as the general F27 release, and instead provided a beta of Fedora 27 Modular Server. Based on feedback from that beta, they decided to take a different approach, and the Modularity subproject is going back to the drawing board. Fortunately, there is a contingency plan: Fedora’s release engineering team made a “classic” version of Fedora 27 Server — very similar to F26 Server, but with F27’s updated package set. The quality assurance ran this version through validation testing, and it’s being released, so:
  • Fedora 27 Modular Server Gets Canned; Fedora 27 Server Classic Released
    - The Fedora Project's plans on delivering an initial "Fedora 27 Modular Server" build constructed under their new packaging principles has been thwarted. Due to less than stellar feedback on their Fedora 27 Modular Server build, the Fedora Modular working group is going back to the drawing board for determining a brighter future to its design. Previous to being canned, F27 Modular Server was delayed to January but is now being abandoned in its current form.

Early Returns on Firefox Quantum Point to Growth

When we set out to launch Firefox Quantum earlier this year, we knew we had a hugely improved product. It not only felt faster — with a look and feel that tested off the charts — it was measurably faster. Thanks to multiple changes under the hood, we doubled Firefox’s speed while using 30% less memory than Chrome. In less than a month, Firefox Quantum has already been installed by over 170M people around the world. We’re just getting started and early returns are super encouraging. Read more Also: Mozilla Joins Net Neutrality Blackout for ‘Break the Internet’ Day