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Linux

Linux Australia backflips on Appelbaum stance

Filed under
Linux
Legal

Linux Australia has done a backflip on its stance over privacy advocate Jacob Appelbaum who was recently thrown out of several software groupings following numerous accusations of sexual harassment.

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Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" Gets New Test Build, Adds Linux Kernel 4.4.14 LTS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Approximately two months after the release of the first Test build for the upcoming Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" operating system series, the project's development team announced today the availability of the second Test build.

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Want to bring that old netbook back to life? Hands-on with Manjaro LXQt and LXLE

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Either of these would be a good choice for the N150. If I were making the choice it would be Manjaro LXQt, because I like (and trust) Manjaro, it is smaller overall, it has made a lot of the same choices I would make in packages, and it just feels a bit snappier overall on the N150. But other people might very well prefer LXLE because it is based on Ubuntu and they prefer the package selection. It's all good.

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GNU/Linux Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux Desktop Marketshare Just Passed 2 Percent [Ed: Microsoft-connected company]

    Worldwide Linux marketshare has passed 2% for the first time, according to data from analytics company Netmarketshare.

  • Our Second Podcast with James Ramey (Codeweavers)

    Following our first podcast with ProfessorKaos64 featuring his work on SteamOS, here is the second episode this time with the president of Codeweavers, James Ramey, recorded just a couple of weeks ago. We have already had the chance to feature James Ramey regarding DX11 support in the past, and it’s a great time to reconnect with his and his team to see what are the prospects for CrossOver/WINE in the near future. Including DX12 support down the road with Vulkan!

  • Why do we use the Linux kernel's TCP stack?

    I'm at PolyConf in Poland today, and I watched this super interesting talk by Leandro Pereira about Lwan, an ~8000 line of code web server. He talked about a bunch of the optimizations they'd done (improve CPU cache performance! be really careful about locking!). You can read more about the performance on the website & the links there.

  • 32 MB OS for Raspberry Pi 3 | Yocto Project

Solus 1.2.1 and Other Distros

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Peek at a Point Release: Solus 1.2.1

    A lot of incredible work coalesced for Solus 1.2, ranging from improvements to our flagship desktop environment Budgie to significant performance gains in the underlying system. The Installer and Software Center were built from the ground up to address a wide variety of pain points and make the use of Solus easier for everyone. We also were the first operating system to ship the new Arc Icon Theme, not only as the default for Solus 1.2, but also the first to make it readily available in the repo.

  • Solus 1.2 Overview
  • Solus Software Center: Quick Tour
  • [Older] New Creative Linux Distros

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
  • Realtek spins wireless oriented Arduino compatible SBC

    Realtek has launched a $25, Arduino compatible “Ameba” SBC, built around a 166MHz Cortex-M3 RTL8195AM chipset, and offering WiFi and NFC.

    When you think of Realtek Semiconductor, you probably think about audio codecs, but the company makes a wide variety of other ICs and MCUs that end up on hacker boards. Realtek is now trying its hand at its own Arduino compatible SBC: the Realtek IoT Ameba Platform. The board is backed by a community site with plenty of examples of robots, drones, home automation gizmos, and more that run on the Ameba.

  • That Open, Upgradeable ARM Dev Board Is Trying To Make A Comeback

    Remember that Improve Dev Board using an open-source, upgradeable design and running Mer from 2013~2014 before the project collapsed? It's back now in the form of a new crowdfunding campaign with some changes to the hardware and the option of a build-your-own laptop.

Locally-made Linux distro gets an upgrade

Filed under
GNU
Linux

You may not know it, but South Africa actually produces two maker-oriented boards offering an alternative to popular names like Arduino. One of those boards, the Blue Penguin, runs its own distro of Linux called “Guinnux”, and it just got an upgrade.

The Blue Penguin and Guinnux is created by local company Keystone Electronic Solutions. Director and co-founder John Eigelaar runs us through the changes between the previous version, Guinnux 4, and Guinnux 5.

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Linux Mint 18 and PepperMint 7

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Ubuntu 16 vs Linux Mint 18 - BENCHMARKED

    Linux Mint vs Ubuntu! Which is better? In this video we put Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) up against Linux Mint 18 (Sarah) head to head with some benchmarks to see which Linux distribution performs better.

  • Linux Mint 18 “Sarah” Installation Guide with Screenshots

    Good News for the Linux Mint users is that the latest version of Linux Mint 18 along with Cinnamon and Mate desktop environment has been released on 30th June 2016. Code name for Linux Mint 18 is “Sarah” and it is released under Long Term Support(LTS) and will get support until 2021.

  • Linux Mint 18 Overview
  • Linux Mint 18 Screencast and Screenshots
  • Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Has Been Released

    Linux Mint team announced the new version of Linux Mint. The latest version Linux Mint 18 code named "Sarah" is a long term support release which will receive updates for next 5 years. Linux Mint 18 came in two editions "Cinnamon" and "MATE", features lots of improvements, enhanced update manager which allows to install different version of the Linux kernel, there are lots of package updates under the hood and Linux Mint 18 introduced X-Apps: "A new project called X-Apps was started and its goal is to produce generic applications for traditional GTK desktop environments. The idea behind this project is to replace applications which no longer integrate properly outside of a particular environment (this is the case for a growing number of GNOME applications) and to give our desktop environments the same set of core applications, so that each change, each new feature being developed, each little improvement made in one of them will benefit not just one environment, but all of them. The idea for X-Apps are: To use modern toolkits and technologies (GTK3 for HiDPI support, gsettings etc..); To use traditional user interfaces (titlebars, menubars); To work everywhere (to be generic, desktop-agnostic and distro-agnostic); To provide the functionality users already enjoy (or enjoyed in the past for distributions which already lost some functionality); To be backward-compatible (in order to work on as many distributions as possible)..." You can checkout release announcement Cinnamon and Mate.

  • Ubuntu-Based Peppermint 7 Released
  • PepperMint 7 Overview

Debian Edu 8 Operating System Lands as a Complete Linux Solution for Your School

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Today, July 2, 2016, the Debian Edu / Skolelinux project is proud to announce the general availability of the Debian Edu (a.k.a. Skolelinux) 8.0 distribution designed for educational purposes.

Based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" operating system, Debian Edu 8 is now available for any educational institution, such as schools or universities, that want to ditch the bloated and expensive Microsoft Windows with a fresh, Linux kernel-based OS that offers them the freedom they need to fully customize the installation, as well as the unbeatable stability of Debian.

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Also: Debian Edu / Skolelinux Jessie — a complete Linux solution for your school

Debian GNU/Linux a complete Linux solution for your school

My Debian Activities in June 2016

Arch Linux 2016.07.01 Now Available for Download, Ships with Linux Kernel 4.6.3

Filed under
Linux

It's the first day of July, and Arch Linux users already know what this means. Yes, that's right, a new ISO respin, Arch Linux 2016.07.01, has been made available for download.

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More in Tux Machines

Introduction to Modularity

Modularity is an exciting, new initiative aimed at resolving the issue of diverging (and occasionally conflicting) lifecycles of different “components” within Fedora. A great example of a diverging and conflicting lifecycle is the Ruby on Rails (RoR) lifecycle, whereby Fedora stipulates that itself can only have one version of RoR at any point in time – but that doesn’t mean Fedora’s version of RoR won’t conflict with another version of RoR used in an application. Therefore, we want to avoid having “components”, like RoR, conflict with other existing components within Fedora. Read more

Our First Look at Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon

Now that I’ve had about a week to play around in Mint 18, I find a lot to like and have no major complaints. While Cinnamon probably isn’t destined to become my desktop of choice, I don’t dislike it and find it, hands down, the best of the GNOME based desktops I’ve tried so far. Anybody looking for a powerful, all purpose distro that’s designed to work smoothly and which can be mastered with ease would be hard pressed to find anything better. Read more

The subtle art of the Desktop

The history of the Gnome and KDE desktops go a long way back and their competition, for the lack of a better term, is almost as famous in some circles as the religious divide between Emacs and Vi. But is that competition stil relevant in 2016? Are there notable differences between Gnome and KDE that would position each other on a specific segment of users? Having both desktops running on my systems (workstation + laptop) but using really only one of them at all times, I wanted to find out by myself. My workstation and laptop both run ArchLinux, which means I tend to run the latest stable versions of pretty much any desktop software. I will thus be considering the latest stable versions from Gnome and KDE in this post. Historically, the two environments stem from different technical platforms: Gnome relies on the GTK framework while KDE, or more exactly the Plasma desktop environment, relies on Qt. For a long time, that is until well into the development of the Gnome 3.x platform, the major difference was not just technical, it was one of style and experience. KDE used to offer a desktop experience that was built along the lines of Windows, with a start center on the bottom left, a customizable side bar, and desktop widgets. Gnome had its two bars on the top and bottom of the screen, and was seemingly used as the basis for the first design of Mac OS X, with the top bar offering features that were later found in the Apple operating system. Read more

Xubuntu 16.04.1 LTS Released, Upgrade Path from Xubuntu 14.04 LTS Now Open

The first point release of the Xubuntu 16.04 LTS computer operating system has been officially published as part of the Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) announcement earlier in the week. Read more