Linux

Kernel or distros

A Process for Managing and Customizing HPC Operating Systems

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

High-performance computing (HPC) for the past ten years has been dominated by thousands of Linux servers connected by a uniform networking infrastructure. The defining theme for an HPC cluster lies in the uniformity of the cluster. This uniformity is most important at the application level: communication between all systems in the cluster must be the same, the hardware must be the same, and the operating system must be the same. Any differences in any of these features must be presented as a choice to the user. The uniformity and consistency of running software on an HPC cluster is of utmost importance and separates HPC clusters from other Linux clusters.

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Refurbished HP Laptops with Kubuntu

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

It’s always nice to come across Kubuntu being used in the wild. Recently I was pointed to a refurbished laptop shop in Ireland who are selling HP laptops running Kubuntu 14.04LTS. €140 for a laptop? You’d pay as much for just the Windows licence in most other shops.

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Real life experiences thanks to Google Summer of Code projects

Filed under
Linux
Google

While the open source community is filled with some of the most talented minds in the world, fresh perspectives from the next generation of developers is essential to the continued pioneering spirit of open source projects. Such an injection of youthful enthusiasm lends new creative blood to the open source community, allowing projects to stay cutting edge and in keeping with current trends.

To that end, the seeds of progress are often planted in the summertime as enterprising college students participate in the annual Google Summer of Code. The global program offers student developers stipends to write code for various free, open source software projects.

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Inspired by Lego, fuelled by creativity: Linux-based Kano kit wants to get kids hacking again

Filed under
Linux

Both OS X and Windows 8 are fairly closed operating systems, merely allowing coders to run commands and pulling a veil over the internals of the software powering the machine. The same goes for hardware: all-in-ones, laptops, and tablets alike aren't easy for curious types to take apart and see what's inside.

It's a situation that's creating a generation of individuals that merely use their PCs, instead of using them to create.

A small British company with an Israeli founder, Yonatan Raz-Fridman, and strong Israeli ties, is trying to change that. Kano is offering a 'do it yourself' computer kit based on the popular Raspberry Pi $35 Linux PC, and designed to encourage users of all ages to explore and create with technology.

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SCSI Multi-Queue Performance Appears Great For Linux 3.17

Filed under
Linux

Building upon the major blk-mq work for the multi-queue block layer, the SCSI multi-queue code is now in good shape according to its developers, is delivering very promising performance results, and should be merged into the Linux 3.17 kernel cycle.

SCSI-mq is too late for Linux 3.16, but it was already anticipated it would come with Linux 3.17. SCSI-mq is about plugging the SCSI kernel code to take advantage of the multi-queue block layer code. "This patch adds support for an alternate I/O path in the scsi midlayer which uses the blk-mq infrastructure instead of the legacy request code. Use of blk-mq is fully transparent to drivers." The multi-queue block layer was first introduced in Linux 3.14 and is now fairly complete with Linux 3.16. The multi-queue block layer allows balancing I/O workload across multiple CPU cores and supports multiple hardware queues along with other performance optimizations.

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Linux Kernel 3.14 Breaks Wine for 16-bit Windows Applications

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Linux users need Wine to run applications from the Windows platform, but the bulk of apps accessed in this way is actually quite old. Sure enough, it's possible to run newer software as well, but most users need Wine for much older stuff.

One of the latest updates for Linux kernel 3.14.x brought some modifications and users found out that they couldn’t run Wine configured as Windows 9x, which is actually an important option.

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ALSA 1.0.28 Released

Filed under
Linux

ALSA 1.0.28 features various small updates to the alsa-oss and alsa-tools components, adds new sound firmware files for the Cirrus Logic CS46xx, boasts small changes to alsa-plugins, and as usual most of the work happened within the alsa-lib and alsa-utils components. Within the ALSA library for 1.0.28 are many API updates while within the ALSA utilities area are many updates to ALSA Control and Speaker Test.

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Is Open Source the New De Facto Standard?

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Marc Cohn, senior director of market development at Ciena Corp. (NYSE: CIEN) and chair of the ONF market education committee, kicked off the discussion and highlighted the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) Network Functions Virtualization ISG's decision to start its own open source project, called Open Platform for NFV, or OPN, with the Linux Foundation , which already runs OpenDaylight .

The idea, Cohn said after the panel, is to develop a framework for an open NFV platform in a similar way that OpenDaylight has created an open source approach to an SDN controller. Participation in the OPN requires a financial buy-in for both network operators and industry hardware and software vendors, and if it follows the Open Daylight model, would also require the contribution of code.

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Zukimac Is a Flawless Mac Theme for Ubuntu (If You Like that Sort of Thing)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

Unlike other attempts at aping the appearance of Cupertino’s finest OS, this one actually looks and feels like it was made for Linux and not the half-hearted mish-mash of OS X assets laid over basic theming that other themes of this ilk tend to resemble. If Apple made a GTK3 theme chances are it would look like Zukimac.

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What is the best Linux filesystem for MariaDB?

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

The short answer to the question of which is the best filesystem for a MariaDB server is ext4, XFS, or Btrfs. Why those three? All are solid enterprise journaling filesystems that scale nicely from small to very large files and very large storage volumes.

[...]

Trying to figure out which filesystem gives the best performance may be fun, but the filesystem won't make a large difference in the performance of your MariaDB server. Your hardware is the most crucial factor in eking out the most speed. Fast hard drives, discrete drive controllers, lots of fast RAM, a multi-core processor, and a fast network have a larger impact on performance than the filesystem. You can also tailor your MariaDB configuration options for best performance for your workloads.

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What other people are saying about Lubuntu 14.04

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Personally I think Lubuntu is great, especially for low end computers short of RAM. Lubuntu lends itself perfectly to netbooks and I wrote an article when Lubuntu 13.10 was released explaining why.

Shortly I will be showing how to try Lubuntu out without messing up your current Windows XP installation. Before I do though I thought I would list a few alternative reviews so that you can get a fully balanced opinion.

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Linux 3.16 Won't Land On Ubuntu 14.10 Quite Yet

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Developers are planning for Linux 3.16 to be the kernel of Ubuntu 14.10 but they're holding off on shipping any early release candidates to testers currently on Ubuntu 14.10, the Utopic Unicorn.

Today's Ubuntu kernel team meeting minutes note, "We have rebased our Utopic kernel to v3.15 final and uploaded (3.15.0-6.11). As noted in previous meetings, we are planning on converging on the v3.16 kernel for Utopic. We have started tracking v3.16-rc1 in our 'unstable' ubuntu-utopic branch. We’ll let this marinate and bake for a bit before we do an official v3.16 based upload to the archive."

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The People Who Support Linux: Embedded Linux Hobbyist Maintains eLinux Wiki

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Bill Traynor first got hooked on embedded Linux development when a friend who maintained Hitachi's SH architecture helped him install Linux on his Sega Dreamcast. From there he developed a hobby of installing Linux on various gaming consoles, toys, and handheld devices. And when embedded development boards became more abundant, accessible and cheaper, Traynor moved on to more serious tinkering.

“For me, the availability of Linux on the many low-cost, ARM-based dev boards has been fun,” he said via email. “Small, powerful boards, like the BeagleBone Black have really made things fun again.”

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Systemd's Plan For Stateless Systems, Factory Resets

Filed under
Linux

Following the exciting systemd 214 release that worked on new sandboxing features and other improvements toward a stateless Linux system, Lennart Poettering has blogged about the latest features and their plans going forward.

The current big work within systemd involves a factory reset option, stateless system support, and the ability to have reproducible/verifiable systems. Systemd 214 laid some ground work while the upcoming systemd 215 release does more on this front.

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Allwinner A23 "Sun8i" Support Gets Cleaned Up For The Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux

Developers have put out their latest batch of Allwinner patches that allow for basic upstream kernel support of Allwinner's A23 SoC.

The Allwinner A23 SoC is a dual-core Cortex-A7 part that's been out since last year. The A23 isn't impressive by other tier-one ARM SoCs, but it's low-cost and with the A23 System-on-a-Chip they switched from using PowerVR graphics to instead using ARM's Mali with their new designs.

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Migration to open source tool inspires new Linux distribution

Filed under
GNU
Linux

In 2005, in version 5.0, The Pharmacy Server was mature and solid, running on a central server that supported over 300 drugstore chains in Brazil, and has been featured by Red Hat as a certification success story.

In 2010, after mergers and acquisitions, the company's operation was terminated and Pharmacy Server was shut down. Its last version used Red Hat 5.4, Firebird 1.5.3, and a custom version of Webmin web admin interface.

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IFC6410 Pico-ITX Development Board Now Supports Fedora And Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
Ubuntu

Makers, hobbyists and developers looking for a new Linux Fedora or Ubuntu development board for their projects might be interested to learn that the IFC6410 Pico-ITX board which is available to purchase for around $149.

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Rescatux 0.32 Beta 1 OS Can Help Users Fix Windows Systems and Linux Distributions

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Rescatux can fix GRUB and GRUB2, check and fix filesystems (Windows MBR included), change GNU/Linux passwords, regenerate sudoers files, and much more.

Having a set of tools that can help you save your system from various problems is great, especially when those tools are packaged in a nice Debian-based Live distro. It may not look like much, but the point of this OS is not to look good, but to do a very specific job.

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Control Your Phone with These Open Source Linux Apps

Filed under
Linux
OSS

If your phone can be connected to your computer with an USB cable you can do a lot more through this connection than just recharging it or transferring files to and from your phone's storage. For example, you can make phone calls, read and send text messages, and see a bunch of other information from your phone, right on your PC. There is a number of Free Open Source software applications that allow you to do this, and you don't even need to have a smartphone for this to work, just a phone that can connect to USB.

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World’s most secure Android phone finally starts shipping next month

Filed under
Android
Linux
Security
  • World’s most secure Android phone finally starts shipping next month

    Secure communications specialist Silent Circle recently set out to build the most secure Android phone in the world, and some have gone as far as to call the company’s Blackphone an “NSA-proof” smartphone. That statement can’t be confirmed, of course, since the NSA surely still has a few tricks up its sleeve that we don’t know about. What we can say, however, is that people concerned with keeping their mobile communications private will soon have a new option that is more secure than any publicly available Android phone currently on the market.

  • Silent Circle's Blackphone will ship out in three weeks

    Silent Circle in partnership with Geeksphone announced the Blackphone in January this year. The makers of the Blackphone claims that the handset is the world's first smartphone that gives its user total control of privacy.

    The upcoming smartphone is powered by a modified version of Android, PrivatOS, which is believed to be more security-oriented. The Blackphone will be carrier and vendor independent, which will ensure that individuals and businesses are able to make and receive secure phone calls, send texts, store files, browse the internet and more without compromising the privacy of the user.

  • Blackphone is about to sidle stealthily into the mainstream
  • NSA-Proof? Super-Secure Blackphone Shipping by July
  • Super-Secure Blackphone Shipping by July
  • Anti-forensic mobile OS gets your phone to lie for you

    In Android Anti-forensics: Modifying CyanogenMod Karl-Johan Karlsson and William Bradley Glisson present a version of the Cyanogenmod alternate operating system for Android devices, modified so that it generates plausible false data to foil forensic analysis by law enforcement. The idea is to create a mobile phone that "lies" for you so that adversaries who coerce you into letting them take a copy of its data can't find out where you've been, who you've been talking to, or what you've been talking about.

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