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Linux Kernel News

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6 Ways Mr. Robot Is Putting Linux in the Public Eye

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One of the main Linux draws is its customization, and one of the most important areas is the desktop environment. Of the Linux desktop environments, GNOME and KDE are two of the leading environments. Tyrell Wellick (Martin Wallström) says to protagonist Elliot, “So I see you’re running Gnome! You know I’m actually on KDE myself.” Those familiar with Linux and its environments will appreciate this moment, especially Wellick’s follow up, “Yeah, I know what you’re thinking, I’m an executive running Linux, why am I even running Linux?”

Not only do we learn about KDE and GNOME, but there’s even a bit about the perception of Linux use in the enterprise (hint: it’s usually relegated to sysadmins and tech specialists, not execs).

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Tizen in Africa

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i.MX8 “eCockpit” SoC arrives, with media and IoT versions coming

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NXP unveiled its automotive i.MX8 Quad with four Cortex-A53 cores, two Cortex-M4F cores, and two GPUs. The QuadPlus and QuadMax add one and two -A72 cores.

Freescale teased its automotive i.MX8 family in 2015 before the company was acquired by NXP, a process that may have contributed to the SoC family’s delays. The first three i.MX8 models are now due to sample in Q1 2017, says NXP, which has already built a development kit for the SoC, shown farther below. In addition, plans have leaked for future i.MX8 models for multimedia and low-power IoT applications, including dual-core models (see farther below).

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Linux and Microsoft

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  • BIOS Problems and Solutions

    When Lenovo released the Yoga 900-13ISK2 it became apparent that Linux and BSD users could not rely on closed source BIOSes. Of course while it is rather naive to think that a Microsoft Signature Edition PC would be Linux friendly, one could hope that at least it would not be Linux or BSD hostile. On further analysis one can see that this is not the case, and any would-be Linux user is in for a very difficult time trying to load any operating system other than Windows 10.

    The exact reasons for this problem boil down to the inability of the BIOS to set Advanced Host Controller Interface (AHCI) mode for the SSD. Now I knew long ago that closed source BIOSes could become a problem back in the mid-1990s. I've spent considerable time researching the ways one can obtain a computer with FOSS firmware.

    Before I go into the specifics of which computers actually have a BIOS with freely available source code allow me to recap some computer history. When we look at the original IBM PC BIOS we can see that it's been well analyzed and that no other operating systems have been locked out. In addition to this there was no way to alter the BIOS save for swapping out the BIOS chip and putting in a different one. So for several years people didn't give much thought to the BIOS, as long as their computer booted they could load whatever operating system they wanted, be it Unix, Minix, MS-DOS, CP/M, etc.

  • OCI Announces New Tools Projects and 1.0 Release Candidates

    With ContainerCon Europe currently underway in Berlin, we want to share some of the great progress the Open Container Initiative (OCI) has made.

    The OCI was launched with the express purpose of developing standards for the container format and runtime that will give everyone the ability to fully commit to container technologies today without worrying that their current choice of infrastructure, cloud provider or tooling will lock them in.

  • Never explain, never apologize: Microsoft silent on email server grief

    A tweak to Microsoft's cloud service has blocked a good number of people from accessing their messages.

    Specifically, the baffling and unannounced change affects users with connected accounts: these are email accounts hosted on third-party servers (such as a company's private server or an ISP's mail server) that are accessed via the cloud. People with this setup are no longer able to send or receive mail through Redmond's webmail service.

    Reg reader David Barrett, who runs an internet-facing server for his friends and a UK health charity, said the issue has left those users who run with outside mail systems unable to get their email for days now.

    "It happened around the end of last week/over the weekend and seems to have been a gradual rollout," he told us.

Linux Kernel News

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  • Systemd Now Supports The RISC-V CPU Architecture
  • Persistent Memory Was A Popular Topic At This Week's LinuxCon Europe

    With Intel's 3D Xpoint Optane technology beginning to appear as extremely fast non-volatile memory and other advancing efforts in the NVDIMM space like ReRAM, persistent memory was a popular topic at this week's LinuxCon Europe event in Berlin.

    Persistent memory is about non-volatime memory that retains data while being DMA-capable and offer memory-like performance. There's been a lot of work building up in this space from libraries supporting it to DAX (Direct Access) support in Linux file-systems for use on persistent memory. Several presentations were done this week about the latest tech and Linux support for it.

  • Linux 4.9: F2FS Gets Performance Enhancements, EXT4 Gets Fixes

    The F2FS (Flash-Friendly File-System) and EXT4 file-system feature updates have been sent in for the Linux 4.9 merge window.

  • Intel Integrated Sensor Hub (ISH) Support In Linux 4.9 Kernel

    The Intel Integrated Sensor Hub (ISH) is supported in the Linux 4.9 kernel code for benefiting Cherrytrail mobile/convertible/ultrabook hardware and newer.

    The Intel ISH is an on-package sensor hub used on some systems in place of external sensor hubs. The ISH provides sensors like detecting device rotation, automatic backlight adjustment, and can also be responsible for some low-power sleep states. This is for Cherrytrail and newer, including some Skylake notebooks.

  • The State & Future Of Linux Power Management (2016)

Some Myths About Linux That Cause New Users To Run Away From Linux

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Yes! You read right. While the world is realizing the power of Linux, on the other hand there are also people who are often found debating in the communities like, Reddit about how bad Linux is due to several problems. Several issues that are raised are actually myths about Linux. So here is a try from LinuxAndUbuntu to cover and clear some of the most talked Linux myths.

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Why public libraries need to support open source

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People turn to public libraries for answers, and a lot of times libraries are superb at providing them. But when it comes to providing answers about open source, libraries have an uneven track record.

What can we do to make this better so that more people can turn to their public library to learn about open source software, hardware, and principles?

Right now, if you walked into my public library and pelted me with questions about open source—like, "What is it?" "How does it work?" "How can I use open source?"—I'd rattle off answers so fast you'd be walking out with a new tool or technology under your belt. Open source is a big world, so of course there are some things I don't know, but guess what? We have the Internet and books right at our finger tips. Saying that you don't know the answer is fine, and patrons will respect you for it. The key is helping them find the answer.

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Why Linux pioneer Linus Torvalds prefers x86 over ARM

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Linux pioneer Linus Torvalds is a stand-up guy -- he says what he feels. There's no sugarcoating, and he'll admit to faults, like recent issues with the Linux 4.8 kernel.

He was full of surprises at last week's Linaro Connect conference, when he was asked about his favorite chip architecture. He didn't blink before saying it was x86, not ARM.

It may have been the long history of x86 with PCs that influenced his answer. There's little fragmentation of software and hardware with x86, and things just work.

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Linux Kernel 4.8.1 Is Out, Stable Enough for Deployment in GNU/Linux Distros

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Today, October 7, 2016, renowned Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman proudly announced the availability of the first point release to the latest Linux 4.8 kernel series.

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Also: Linux 4.8.1

Linux 4.7.7

Linux 4.4.24

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More in Tux Machines

GParted Live 0.27.0-1 Disk Partitioning Live CD Out Now, Based on GParted 0.27.0

Just one day after announcing the release of the GParted 0.27.0 open-source partition editor software, Curtis Gedak is informing us about the availability of the GParted Live 0.27.0-1 stable release. Read more

Netrunner Core 16.09 "Avalon" Is Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8, KDE Plasma 5.7.5

Today, October 23, 2016, the development team behind the Debian-based Netrunner GNU/Linux distribution proudly announced the release of Netrunner Core 16.09 "Avalon." Read more

today's leftovers

  • Acer updates Chromebook 15 with 12-hour battery life -- $199 exclusively at Walmart
    Chromebooks are not for everyone, but for many home users, it is absolute perfection. If you live in the web browser -- as many people do nowadays -- laptops running Google's Linux-based Chrome OS are a godsend because they are maintenance free. No need for confusing OS upgrades or anti-virus software. It just works, and it works well. Since they can now run Android apps too, they could become a serious threat to Microsoft and Windows 10. One of the most attractive aspects of Chromebooks is price -- they are often quite affordable. Today, Acer refreshes its 15.6 inch Chromebook 15 with a mind-boggling 12 hours of battery life. Best of all? It starts at $199. Yes, this model will get Android app support in a future update too.
  • Of Life, Linux and Karma Angels
    Angel filed appeal after appeal only to be denied on every attempt. Texas is an "at will" employment state so being terminated for cause can mean anything. Over the next few weeks, Angel became more and more fearful of losing her house, as she had just purchased it a year before. On top of that, her HP desktop had taken a nose dive into severe brokeness and that made it extra difficult for her to look for work. I put together a decent desktop for her and installed it that day, and was a Linux computer. Angel didn't have even the slightest problem with the new machine, and she wasn't particularly good at using one. So, let's put another slash in the falsehood that Linux is too hard for the everyday user. Most of them anyway. YMMV. To her glee, the OS picked up and configured her Epson all in one without her lifting a finger to do so. She almost clapped for happiness, stating that in Windows, installing that printer had been a nightmare, even with the included driver CD. And just to pinpoint the time frame for you, it was the summer of 2006.
  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided to launch on Linux in November, Mac version delayed
    Feral Entertainment has announced that Deus Ex: Mankind Divided will be launching on Linux in November. Feral Interactive is currently working on the Linux port of the game. In September the game development studio announced that Deus Ex: Mankind Divided would make its way to two additional platforms: Linux and Mac. The Linux version of the game will most likely make use of OpenGL or Vulkan to power its graphics engine.
  • Mad Max: It Came From The Desert to Linux
    First of all, let me get one thing straight out of the way, so you know where I come from. I did not like the recent Mad Max movie. Like, not at all. Not that I mind the post apocalyptic theme. I used to like the older Mad Max’s just fine (probably the first one the best). The new one…meh. The Max character had virtually no back story (as thin as a sheet of paper) and he was just acting like a crazy person from beginning to end. The story’s premise was boring and just an excuse for endless and not so impressive action scenes. So there was nothing redeeming it. I know this is not the mainstream opinion of the movie (everyone apparently thought it was the best thing ever since sliced bread) so I can only attribute this phenomenon to either mass hysteria or simply a clear decrease in movie expectations. The Force Awakens‘ success, despite being a mediocre movie and certainly underwhelming compared to the original trilogy, certainly echoes the same trend. I guess you cannot beat nostalgia. Just tag a Millennium Falcon on and you get a free ride no matter how incoherent the story or the characters are.
  • Budgie Remix 16.10 Overview
  • I Switched To OpenSuse Tumbleweed :)
  • 50-day Moving Average Of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) At $76.67
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT) – Is this large market cap stock undervalued?
  • Fedora 25 new features, Perl removed from Build Root
    Fedora is the fast-paced bleeding-edge distribution of Red Hat. Fedora 25 is the second release of 2016 the other being Fedora 24. Let’s discover what lies in the future of this popular Linux distribution especially among developers.
  • "dnf update" considered harmful
    Updating a Linux distribution has historically been done from the command line (using tools like Debian's apt-get, openSUSE's zypper, or Fedora's yum—or its successor dnf). A series of crashes during system updates on Fedora 24 led Adam Williamson to post a note to fedora-devel and other mailing lists warning people away from running "dnf update" within desktop environments. It turns out that doing so has never truly been supported—though it works the vast majority of the time. The discussion around Williamson's note, however, makes it clear that the command is commonly run that way and that at least some users are quite surprised (and unhappy) that it isn't a supported option.
  • Supporting UEFI secure boot in Debian
    The Debian project can be accused of many things, but jumping too quickly on leading-edge technology is not one of them. That can be seen in, among other things, the fact that there is still not a version of the distribution that supports the UEFI secure boot mechanism. But, as Ben Hutchings explained during his 2016 Kernel Recipes talk, such support is in the works, and it will be implemented in a uniquely Debian-like manner.
  • The Lenovo Yoga Book Is the Future of Laptops, But It's Missing an Operating System
    For this review I spent a week with the Android version of Lenovo’s slick new backflipping laptop. Guts-wise it’s identical to the Windows 10 variant. They both feature Intel Atom x5-Z8550 processors, 4GB of RAM, 64GB of on-device storage, and 1920 x 1200 resolution displays. The Android version starts at $500 and the Windows version starts at $550.
  • Another Broken Nexus 5
    In late 2013 I bought a Nexus 5 for my wife [1]. It’s a good phone and I generally have no complaints about the way it works. In the middle of 2016 I had to make a warranty claim when the original Nexus 5 stopped working [2]. Google’s warranty support was ok, the call-back was good but unfortunately there was some confusion which delayed replacement. Once the confusion about the IMEI was resolved the warranty replacement method was to bill my credit card for a replacement phone and reverse the charge if/when they got the original phone back and found it to have a defect covered by warranty. This policy meant that I got a new phone sooner as they didn’t need to get the old phone first. This is a huge benefit for defects that don’t make the phone unusable as you will never be without a phone. Also if the user determines that the breakage was their fault they can just refrain from sending in the old phone.