Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

Dueling Arduinos Include Linux in Recent SBC Announcements

Filed under
Linux

Few would claim that the year-old fork and legal dispute between rival Arduino camps is healthy for the open source hardware community. Yet, so far, the platform remains strong, despite growing competition from open source Linux SBCs like the Raspberry Pi. In large part, this is due to the rising interest in Internet of Things (IoT) devices, which dovetails nicely with the low-power, gadget-oriented MCU-based platform.

Read more

New Tool Promises to Help You Create Your Own Arch Linux Package Repositories

Filed under
Linux

There's a new tool out there that we would like to introduce to our Arch Linux power users who are already familiar with the complexities of AUR packaging and maintaining.

Read more

Linux containers vs. VMs: A security comparison

Filed under
Linux
Server

In this article, I’ll take two different approaches to comparing VM and container security. The first approach will be more structural, or theoretical, looking at the characteristics of each from a security perspective. Then I’ll apply a more practical analysis by looking at what happens in a typical breach and how it might be affected by container and VM architectures.

Read more

Wireless-rich “WaRP7” module aims i.MX7 at wearables, IoT

Filed under
Android
Linux

NXP and Element14 unveiled a tiny “WaRP7” module for wearables and IoT that combines an i.MX7 Solo SoC with WiFi, Bluetooth, BLE, NFC, and MikroBus expansion.

Element14 has partnered with NXP on an update to the original Freescale WaRP board, which ran on the Freescale (now NXP) i.MX6 Solo SoC. The WaRP7 shares the same Wearables Reference Platform (WaRP) branding as the WaRP, and is similarly a sandwich-style COM with I/O daughter card design running Linux and Android.

Read more

Jeff Hoogland Talks Bodhi Linux, Enlightenment, Moksha and ‘Magic the Gathering’

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The last Foss Force interview with Jeff Hoogland was in January, 2015. He had un-project-headed himself from his creation, Bodhi Linux, then decided to return. He’s still there, maintaining his Enlightment-based Ubuntu derivative. Why yet another distro? Hoogland says why quite eloquently during the interview, so there’s no need to repeat his words here. He’ll also explain the Moksha desktop and explain why it is based on E-17 instead of a more recent version. (The Wikipedia link above will teach you about the Enlightment desktop’s tangled path, which is way beyond the scope of this video intro.) Besides Bodhi Linux and being a full-time dad, he is a pro-level Magic the Gathering player, complete with active Twitch and YouTube feeds devoted to the game. A full life indeed! (We should all live so well, eh?)

Read more

Manjaro ARM 16.05 Officially Released with Full Support for Raspberry Pi 2 SBCs

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Manjaro community is proud to announce the first production-ready version of the Manjaro ARM operating system, a specially crafted Manjaro Linux flavor for ARM devices, such as the popular Raspberry Pi boards.

After having it in development for the past three months, the Manjaro ARM development team led by Dodge JCR has released the Manjaro ARM 16.05 operating system for Raspberry Pi 2 single-board computers, based, of course, on the unofficial Arch Linux for ARM project.

Read more

Enlightenment 0.20.8 Desktop Environment Makes Startup Apps Work Again

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The lightweight and eye-candy Enlightenment desktop environment/window manager received yet another maintenance release for its current stable branch, version 0.20.8.

Enlightenment 0.20.8 arrives one day after the Enlightenment Developer Days 2016 conference for Enlightenment developers and contributors, which took place earlier this week between May 14-16, in Paris, France.

Read more

Docker News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
  • Takeaways from Docker's Solomon Hykes keynote at OSCON

    In the opening OSCON keynote this morning, the founder of Docker, Solomon Hykes, gave us a fantastic birds-eye view of lessons learned from the "firehose" while building a successful open source project. He calls this process: Incremental Revolution.

    Hykes says, "The world needs the tools for mass innovation, tools that encapsulate the harder parts of technology in order to unlock creativity." Further, the growing Internet of Things (IoT), a programmable Internet, will be the ultimate tool of mass innovation, programming lots of things simultaneously or in parallel, rather than one at a time.

  • 3 Reasons Docker and Containerization Lit Up Application Development [Video]

    Docker was the flame that catalyzed innovation in application development, according to Scott Johnston, senior vice president of product management and design at Docker. However, that success was entirely unforeseen.

    "I wish I could say that we had a premeditated mindset three years ago when we released Docker," Johnston said in his keynote at last month's Collaboration Summit. "But we did not." Looking back, he sees three main reasons for Docker’s success: Accessibility, Portability, and Openness.

  • Docker 1.11: The first runtime built on containerd and based on OCI technology

    Docker Engine 1.11 has been released, built on runC and containerd. "runC is the first implementation of the Open Containers Runtime specification and the default executor bundled with Docker Engine. Thanks to the open specification, future versions of Engine will allow you to specify different executors, thus enabling the ecosystem of alternative execution backends without any changes to Docker itself. By separating out this piece, an ecosystem partner can build their own compliant executor to the specification, and make it available to the user community at any time – without being dependent on the Engine release schedule or wait to be reviewed and merged into the codebase."

Kernel Space/Linux Releases

Filed under
Linux

Linux Mint 18

Filed under
Linux

As the release date for Linux Mint 18 approaches, project announcers have reported that they are no longer shipping live CD images with embedded codecs. Furthermore, they also are dropping support for OEM images with codecs. These changes bring Mint in line with most other distros, which also feature codec-free images. This also means they can release new versions of Mint faster.

At first glance, this may seem to be a case of the developers putting their needs ahead of their users', but in actual fact, the impact on end users will be minimal. The new flavor of Mint will come with several simple ways to include codecs during or after installation. (It will require an Internet connection to download the codec packages.)

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Red Hat News

Linux Devices

Leftovers: OSS

  • Quantifying Benefits of Network Virtualization in the Data Center
    Modern data centers have increased significantly in scale and complexity as compute and storage resources become highly virtualized. The rise of the DevOps style of application deployment means that data center resources must be agile and respond rapidly to changing workload requirements. Data center network technologies have been challenged to keep up with these rapidly evolving application requirements.
  • Apache Zeppelin Joins Several Other Projects Gaining Top-Level Status
    As we've been reporting, The Apache Software Foundation, which incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, has been elevating a lot of interesting new tools to Top-Level Status recently. The foundation has also made clear that you can expect more on this front, as graduating projects to Top-Level Status helps them get both advanced stewardship and certainly far more contributions. Only a few days ago, the foundation announced that a project called TinkerPop has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). TinkerPop is a graph computing framework that provides developers the tools required to build modern graph applications in any application domain and at any scale. Now, it has announced that Apache Zeppelin has graduated as well. Zeppelin is a web-based notebook that enables interactive data analytics.
  • 6 Open Source Operating Systems for the Internet of Things (IoT)
    Whether you are small to large enterprises, IoT is one of the useful technology that can help you to be connected on-the-go.
  • 6 open source architecture projects to check out
    The world of architecture doesn't change as quickly as software, but architects are still finding new ways to share innovative designs and ideas. The open source architecture movement aims to make architectural designs, drawings, 3D renderings, and documentation freely available for integration into other projects under open source licenses. It owes much of its growth to the growing popularity of the maker movement, DIY culture, 3D printing, and CNC machines, as well as support from architects like Alejandro Aravana.
  • Yorubaname.com has gone opensource, codebase now on GitHub
    Online dictionary for yoruba names, YorubaName, has now made its backlog accessible to the public. In a post on their blog, the guys at YorubaName announced that the website codebase is now on GitHub.
  • A New Version of Rust Hits the Streets
    Version 1.9 of the Rust programming language has been released. Rust is a new language with a small but enthusiastic community of developers.
  • Here's how you can make a career in OpenStack
    OpenStack is one of the biggest open source movements. It is a free and open-source software platform for cloud computing, mostly deployed as an infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS). The software platform consists of interrelated components that control hardware pools of processing, storage, and networking resources throughout a data centre. According to the official website, hundreds of the world's largest brands rely on OpenStack to run their businesses every day, reducing costs and helping them move faster. OpenStack has a strong ecosystem globally.
  • Compatibility before purity: Microsoft tweaks .NET Core again [Ed: Microsoft lied about .NET going Open Source; just forked it into Open Core version]
    Microsoft's open source fork of the .NET platform, called .NET Core, will be modified for better compatibility with existing applications, says Program Manager Immo Landwerth in a recent post.
  • EMC Ships Open Source Tool for Cloud and IoT Devices
  • Watch Benjamin Hindman Co-Creator of Apache Mesos Speak Live Tomorrow at MesosCon [Ed: Microsoft proxy in a sense]
  • MesosCon Preview: Q&A with Twitter’s Chris Pinkham
  • How to secure your open source code [Ed: more marketing nonsense of Black Duck]
  • Luxembourg launches open data portal
    The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg officially launched its national open data portal data.public.lu on April 8th. This portal, supported by Digital Luxembourg, the government agency in charge of digital affairs in the country, was presented during the Game of Code hackathon.
  • Denmark to accelerate government digitisation
    Open standards The existing shared solutions are to be adopted by all authorities and public sector institutions where relevant, according to a presentation in English. “Shared solutions need to be stable, secure and user-friendly, they will also be easy to implement because the infrastructure is based on open standards.” The strategy, an agreement involving the government, regions and municipalities, was announced on 12 May. It includes 33 initiatives, which among other things deal with ease of use, reuse of data, IT architecture, growth, security and digital skills, DIGST says.