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Linux

Onion Omega2 vs. Raspberry Pi Zero

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Linux
Gadgets

An Alternative List Of The Top 3 Linux Distributions For The Everyday Linux User

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Linux

David has come up with three Linux distributions: Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE and Damn Small Linux.

Ubuntu MATE would definitely be close to reaching my top five and I would recommend Lubuntu for low end computers and older netbooks.

Damn Small Linux might be a bit daunting for non-technical users and for something of that size it might be worth thinking about a Puppy Linux such as Simplicity.

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Tiny Intel “Joule” IoT module runs Ostro Linux on quad-core Atom

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Linux

Intel’s “Joule” IoT module integrates a 64-bit quad-core Atom SoC, up to 4GB RAM and 16GB eMMC, plus BT/WiFi, 4K video, CSI/DSI, GPIO, USB, and UART I/O.

At the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) 2016 in San Francisco today, Intel unveiled a tiny Joule computer-on-module that targets makers, innovators, and entrepreneurs developing Internet of Things devices. The module will be available in two versions, based on Atom T5700 and T5500 SoCs, and is supported by the Yocto Project-based Ostro Linux distribution, which similarly targets IoT apps.

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GNU/Linux Desktop

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

New Releases

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GNU
Linux
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Linux Kernel 4.8 Release Candidate Build

    As expected, Linus Torvalds made his Sunday announcement for the second RC (Release Candidate) build of the upcoming Linux 4.8 kernel branch, which is now available for public testing.

    Linux kernel 4.8 entered development last week, when the merge window was officially closed and the first Release Candidate development milestone released to the world. According to Linus Torvalds, the second RC build is here to update more drivers, even more hardware architectures, as well as to fix issues for supported filesystems and add some extra mm work.

  • Elive 2.7.2 Beta Is Out with Spotify Support, Improved Artwork, and Thunar Fixes

    On August 14, 2016, the Elive development team was proud to announce the release and immediate availability of yet another Beta version of the Elive Linux operating system.

    Elive 2.7.2 comes only three weeks after the release of the previous Beta build, version 2.7.1, to implement out-of-the-box support for the popular Spotify digital music service, giving users direct access to millions of songs if they have a paid subscription, and a much-improved artwork, as both the system and icon themes were enhanced.

  • First Beta of Black Lab Linux 8 "Onyx" Hits the Streets, Based on Ubuntu 14.04.5

    Until today, Black Lab Linux 8.0 "Onyx" has been in the Alpha stages of development and received a total of four Alpha builds that have brought multiple updated components and GNU/Linux technologies, but now the Ubuntu-based operating system has entered a much more advanced development state, Beta, and the first one is here exactly six months after the development cycle started.

    "Today the Black Lab Linux development team is pleased to announce the release of Black Lab Linux 8 'Onyx' Beta 1. Bringing us one step closer to our goal of a stable, secure, and long term supported Linux desktop for the masses. 'Onyx' Beta 1 is a culmination of over 6 months of user collaboration and feedback," says Roberto J. Dohnert, Black Lab Software CEO.

  • Maui 1 Screenshot Tour

News About Servers

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GNU
Linux
  • Why private clouds will suffer a long, slow death

    Analyst firm Wikibon believes that no vendor is making more than $100 million via OpenStack. If that’s anywhere near true, the sum total of all vendors has to be less than $2 billion.

  • M$ Shoots Foot, Again

    Not being able to sell software unbundled from hardware is a terrible deficit in a world where people are building open servers.

  • Microsoft: Why we had to tie Azure Stack to boxen we picked for you

    Microsoft has explained the rationale behind last month’s announcement that you won’t be allowed to simply download Azure Stack and get going.

    In July Redmond informed fans the only way they’d be able to get Azure in their own data centres would be on hardware of its choosing.

    Specifically, Azure Stack will only come pre-installed on pre-integrated servers from Dell, Hewlett-Packard Enterprise and Lenovo. Other OEMs, we’re promised, will follow.

    The Dell, HP and Lenovo will come “sometime” in 2017. Azure Stack had been expected by the end of 2016, but the work with to produce integrated systems will mean a delay.

Trying to Make Sense of Fuchsia

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Linux
Google
Gadgets
  • Is Fuschsia Google’s answer to Samsung’s Tizen?

    Google is prepping an open source “Fuchsia” OS that can target IoT, handhelds, and laptops. It uses a new “Magenta” kernel, based on the “LK” project.

    Google has posted GitHub code for an emerging operating system called Fuchsia, designed for a wide range of devices. Like Google’s Android, Chrome OS, and IoT-focused Brillo, Fuchsia is open source — but unlike those platforms, it’s not based on the Linux kernel. Instead, it taps an independent, MIT licensed kernel project called “Little Kernel” (LK), which has been under development for several years.

  • Will Google replace Android with Fuchsia?

    Android is one of the most widely used operating systems in the world. But never let it be said that Google is content to rest on past achievements. The company has been hard at work on a new operating system call Fuchsia, and some are wondering if it will eventually replace Android.

  • Google May Paint IoT Fuchsia

    A team at Google is working on a new operating system called "Fuchsia," but details are sparse. Fuchsia "is a new open source project that is not at all related to Android or Chrome OS," said Google spokesperson Joshua Cruz. He declined to provide further details about Fuchsia, saying only that "we have many revolving open source projects at Google." Fuchsia reportedly already has undergone some testing, and it is booting "reasonably well" on NUCs based on Intel's Skylake and Broadwell processors.

  • Why Google’s new Linux-less Fuchsia operating system is a huge deal

    Google has release all the components of the new operating system in a much more permissible MIT license. The community can try it, contribute to it and reuse it.

    Raspberry Pi 3 users will soon be able to play with Fuchsia, according to Google developer Travis Geiselbrecht, who is working on the project.

Server-Oriented Alpine Linux 3.4.3 Lands with Kernel 4.4.17 LTS, ownCloud 9.0.4

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Linux

The Alpine Linux development team is happy to announce the release and general availability for download of the third maintenance update to the Alpine Linux 3.4 series of server-oriented operating systems.

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4MParted 19.0 Distrolette Now In Beta, Based on 4MLinux 19.0 and GParted 0.26.1

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Development
Linux

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki informs Softpedia today, August 15, 2016, about the availability of the first public Beta release of the upcoming 4MParted distrolette people can use to partition disk drives independent of a computer OS.

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Linux Foundation and Linux

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Linux
  • Kernel prepatch 4.8-rc2
  • Linux 4.8-rc2
  • Testing Network Connectivity for Applications in Containers

    Testing applications is a critical part of software development as illustrated by the rise of continuous integration and automated testing. In his upcoming LinuxCon + ContainerCon talk -- Testing Applications with Traffic Control in Containers -- Alban Crequy will focus on one area of testing that is difficult to automate: poor network connectivity. He will describe a testing approach which emulates network connectivity and which integrates existing Linux kernel features into higher level tools such as Kubernetes and Weave Scope. Additionally, he will show how an application running in Kubernetes behaves in response to changing network parameters.

  • IoTivity 2.0: What’s in Store?

    In May, we reported on an Embedded Linux Conference talk by Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec. We also looked at how the OCF has evolved from the earlier Open Interconnect Consortium (OIC) and acquired the assets of the Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) Forum. Here, we examine another ELC 2016 talk about the specifics of those integrations, as well as other changes planned for the IoTivity 2.0 release due later this year.

  • IoTivity 2.0 by Vijay Kesavan

    Release 2.0 of IoTivity is expected in the latter part of 2016, and this talk will preview some of the features and design updates to IoTivity that are being considered. Features under consideration will enable support for applications in the industrial, automotive, and health sectors. Additional features that enhance cloud technologies and services such as notifications and easy setup will also be discussed.

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More in Tux Machines

The Importance of BSD

The Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) is a Unix operating system developed by the Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG) of the University of California, Berkeley. Read more

Ubuntu 16.10 Unity and Ubuntu MATE

  • Ubuntu 16.10 Unity 8 / Mir - Current State
  • Bytemark sponsor Ubuntu MATE
    A couple of weeks ago the Bytemark Managing Director, Matthew Bloch, contacted the Ubuntu MATE team to offer free hosting for the project. As of August 18th 2016 all the Ubuntu MATE infrastucture is hosted on Bytemark Cloud Servers.
  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Beta 1
    We are underwhelmed to announce, quite possibly, our most uninteresting beta release E-V-E-R! ;-) This beta release is all about the plumbing that transitions Ubuntu MATE to GTK 3.20. It really isn’t very interesting from an end-users perspective.

Linux Foundation and Linux Birthday

LWN at GUADEC

  • Flowgraphs in GTK+
    At GUADEC 2016 in Karlsruhe, Germany, Daniel "grindhold" Brendle presented his work developing a new library and widget set that will allow GTK+ applications to implement flowgraphs in a standard manner. The widget set would enable applications to provide interactive widgets for linking filters and other block-oriented components—a type of interface many applications currently need to reinvent on their own. Flowgraphs, Brendle explained, are a general-purpose diagramming technique that many people will recognize from textbooks and other printed matter. They show how objects, information, and signals flow through some sort of process. Biology textbooks use them to illustrate circulation in the body, technical manuals use them to show how a manufacturing process runs, and so on. In software, he said, they are most familiar as the node-and-pipe diagrams that illustrate signal processing or data filtering.
  • The GNOME Newcomers initiative
    At GUADEC 2016 in Karlsruhe, Germany, Bastien Ilsø and Carlos Soriano reported on the revamped Newcomers section of the GNOME web site. The section is intended to draw in new users and developers and help them find their way around the project as well as to help them get the necessary development environment set up to begin contributing code.