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Linux

You have your Windows in my Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Although there are those who think the systemd debate has been decided in favor of systemd, the exceedingly loud protests on message boards, forums, and the posts I wrote over the past two weeks would indicate otherwise. I've seen many declarations of victory for systemd, now that Red Hat has forced it into the enterprise with the release of RHEL 7. I don't think it's that easy.

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Best Linux and Web-Based Alternatives to Final Draft

Filed under
Linux

As far as writing screenplays is concerned, Hollywood has only one standard: Final Draft. For years, much like Microsoft's monopoly with Windows, the software had no big competitors. From big Hollywood directors like Spielberg to small independent studios, everyone considered Final Draft the gold standard of screenwriting software. In many ways, it still enjoys the same monopoly; however, the stronghold it had over the screenwriting industry isn't the same as before. With its high price, clunky UI, and lots of persistent bugs, Final Draft is slowly being taken over by lesser-known tools in this huge shift that is happening in the screenwriting industry.

Many big writers have slowly started to move to alternative software. One of the biggest proponents of this move is John August, screenwriter of movies like Big Fish and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. His efforts in pushing the open Fountain format, as well as creating Highland, a Mac-based screenwriting software are an indication of how badly Final Draft users need a change.

If you've been stuck with Final Draft for years or are a Linux user looking for alternatives, this is a great time to start writing your screenplay. These days, a lot of new tools have come up that let you write your script either on your Linux desktop or in a browser. And yes, most of these tools are as good as -- and many times -- better than Final Draft.

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Windows XP: Your upgrade experiences

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

I think more media attention needs to be brought to Linux [an open-source operating system] nowadays. I've tried many platforms and have found Lubuntu in particular to be a very sophisticated and extremely lightweight operating system. Even on computers with as little as 512MB of RAM the system boots, runs programs and shuts down like a bullet.

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Linux kernel developer Dmitry Monakhov arrested for protesting Ukraine invasion

Filed under
Linux
Misc

Linux kernel developer Dmitry Monakhov was detained for 15 days for disobeying a police officer on Saturday. The debacle came about when Monakhov decided to protest the recent invasion into Ukraine by Russian armed forces.

This was not the first incident of aggression towards Monakhov. During a rally in July of 2013 he was reported to have been beaten in one of the police vans most likely for participating in expressing his discontent with Putin’s policies regarding human rights.

According to Monakhov’s tweet the day before his most recent run in with the authorities, he announced, “I am a Russian. Not cattle. Not a killer. And it is not the occupier. I am ashamed that my president Putin. At 9.00 I go to Manezhku [Manezh Square] against the war.” after this tweet, pictures surfaced a day later of four Russian policeman arresting him.

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Time For the GNU/Linux Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

M[icrosoft] has deliberately violated the laws of competition in USA and elsewhere repeatedly, systematically and with malice. They are out to get us. At first they got an exclusive deal with IBM to get their foot in the door, piggybacking on IBM’s branding with business, then they demanded exclusive deals with ISVs and manufacturers, then they punished any manufacturer who stepped out of line and installed competing products, then they created an endless chain of incompatible file-format changes and created whole industries based on the existence of overly complex secret protocols and finally forced the world to accept a closed standard as an open standard… That whole burden has served to render IT more expensive to own and to operate and much more fragile than it should be just on technical merits.

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A web browser for the Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
Web

As I previously mentioned, Collabora has been working with the Raspberry Pi Foundation on various projects including a web browser optimised for the Raspberry Pi.
Since the first beta release we have made huge improvements; now the browser is more responsive, it’s faster, and videos work much better (the first beta could play 640×360 videos at 0.5fps, now we can play 25fps 1280×720 videos smoothly). Some web sites are still a bit slow (if they are heavy on the JavaScript side), but there’s not much we can do for web sites that, even on my laptop with an Intel Core i7, use 100% of one of the cores for more than ten seconds.

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Black Lab Linux 5.1 Released

Filed under
Linux

Today we are pleased to release the next in the 5 series of Black Lab Linux. Black Lab Linux 5.1 contains many updates, new features and enhancements to the Black Lab Linux distribution.

Since this is an incremental release we are also making it available for download immediately instead of waiting the 30 day period in where we normally deliver it.

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Ten Linux Desktops Showing Just How Far Behind Mac OS X and Windows Designs Are

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Mac

Linux doesn't have any kind of PR, and in the collective mind of the people, there is still an impression that Linux users spend their time inside the terminal and in dreary desktops. In fact, most of the current Linux desktops are much better than anything made by Apple of Microsoft.

When a new operating system is launched from Microsoft or Apple, it stays pretty much the same as long as it's supported, and even when updates are released, the desktops change very little. On the other hand, Linux developers are pushing the boundaries of what can be done in an operating system every day, and new ideas and applications that enhance the desktop experience are popping up all the time, regardless of the OS devs are doing on their front.

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Matching databases to Linux distros

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Relational database management systems (RDBMSs) aren’t the sort of thing to get most folk out of bed in the morning – unless, of course, you happen to think they’re one of the most brilliant concepts ever dreamed up.

These days you can’t sneeze without someone turning it into a table value in a database somewhere - and in combination with the freely available Linux operating system, there’s no end to them.

Most Linux distros make it almost trivial to add popular DBMSs to your system, such as MySQL and MariaDB, by bundling them in for free in their online app stores. But how do you tell which combination - which Linux distro and which DBMS - will give you the best performance?

This week we've revved up the Labs servers to ask the question: what level of performance do you get from OS repository-sourced DBMSs?

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The Curious Case of Raspberry Pi Consumerism

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

I find the attitude of many within the Raspberry Pi community to be strange and offensive.

I first discovered this odd phenomenon (odd because it contradicts the ethos of the project's academic foundations) back when it first started, as many within the Raspberry Pi community took an extremely hostile attitude toward academic freedom, apparently in defence of various parties' highly dubious intellectual monopolies (Broadcom and MPEG-LA, for example).

I pointed out the irony and hypocrisy of their attitude at the time, explaining that they were more than happy to leech Free (as in freedom) Software for their own benefit, but then balked at the prospect of freely sharing the results, and in particular this contradicted their stated academic goal of facilitating better computer education in UK schools, an environment that rightly demands open access to knowledge.

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FreeBSD 10.1-BETA1 Now Available

The first BETA build of the 10.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available on the FTP servers for the amd64, armv6, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures. The image checksums follow at the end of this email. Installer images and memory stick images are available here: ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/releases/ISO-IMAGES/10.1/ Read more

Samsung to host first open-source conference

SEOUL, Sept. 15 (Yonhap) -- South Korean tech giant Samsung Electronics Co. said Monday it will hold a two-day conference on open-source to allow developers to share ideas on the new industrial trend. The Samsung Open Source Conference (SOSCON), which kicks off Tuesday, aims to cover various themes, such as the Internet of Things, cloud computing, and big data, and other sectors in relation to open-source. U.S.-based Intel Corp. and the Linux Foundation are also sponsors of the event. Read more

Linux 3.17-rc5

So I should probably have delayed this until Wednesday for sentimental reasons: that will be 23 years since I uploaded the 0.01 source tree. But I'm not an overly sentimental person, so screw that. I'm doing my normal Sunday release. And as I mentioned in the rc4 notes, the previous rc was pretty small, possibly because neither Greg nor Davem had sent in any updates that week. Guess what? David's networking updates came in an hour after I did rc4, and sure enough Greg came in this week too, so - surprise surprise - rc5 isn't as small as rc4 was. Oh well. It was too good to last. I also got a report of an *old* performance regression in the dentry cache (since 3.10 - positively ancient), and that in turn made me look around some more, and there were a few other special cases that could cause us to not do as well as we should. I fixed some of it, and Al fixed the rest. So hopefully we not only fixed the reported regression, but are actually doing better than we used to. Anyway, the size of rc5 means that I'm certainly not cutting the release early, which means that I will have to think about exactly what I will do about the next merge window. Because it looks like it might end up conflicting with my travel around LinuxCon EU. I haven't quite decided what I'll do - I might release 3.17 normally, but then just not open the merge window due to travel. Or, if there are more issues than I think there will be, maybe I'll delay the 3.17 release. We'll see. Regardless - the rc5 changes is about half drivers (networking, gpu, usb, input, ata..) with the rest being mostly a mix of filesystem updates (the aforementioned performance thing in the core vfs layer, but also some NFS export issues found by Al and misc other stuff), architecture updates (arm, parisc, s390) and core networking. And a smattering of other. Shortlog appended. In other words, things look fairly normal, even if I'd have been happier with rc5 being smaller. But with the bump from networking and drivers, I'm not going to claim that this was either unexpected or particularly scary. I'm hoping we're done now, and that rc6 and rc7 will be noticeably calmer. Knock wood. Linus Read more

Torvalds says he has no strong opinions on systemd

Linux creator Linus Torvalds is well-known for his strong opinions on many technical things. But when it comes to systemd, the init system that has caused a fair degree of angst in the Linux world, Torvalds is neutral. Read more