Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 291

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Tutorial: Minimal openSUSE 11.1 install

  • News: Ubuntu 9.10 "Karmic Koala", openSUSE Board statement, Red Hat and Microsoft, new Debian secretary, desktop NetBSD and virtual FreeBSD, Linux companies in recession
  • Released last week: SimplyMEPIS 8.0, Arch Linux 2009.02, VectorLinux 6.0
  • Upcoming releases: Ubuntu 9.04 Alpha 5
  • New additions: Nova
  • New distributions: Bio-Linux, Firefly Linux, flexxxpup, Kongoni, Linux4One, moonOS, pupitup, Ubuntu extras remix
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Lenny lights up an old laptop

Filed under
Linux

deviceguru.com: With the Debian Linux project officially designating “Lenny” as its new “stable” distribution, I decided to install it on an old Thinkpad to see how well it performs on a low-end machine.

Kernel Log: Stable series development is speeding up, X Server 1.6 available soon

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: The development speed of the Linux stable series and the number of integrated changes, has been rising in the past few weeks. In February alone, the maintainers of the stable kernel series have released four new versions 2.6.28.x and five new 2.6.27.x kernels,

Linux Monday: Directory for Beginners

Filed under
Linux

jdeeth.blogspot: One of the things that throws people when they're first looking at Linux is that they can't find their C:\ drive. Linux looks at files a little differently than Windows, but it's not too complicated and you shouldn't have to look too deep to find stuff.

How you can help Windows users quit

Filed under
Linux

tuxradar.com: What’s wrong with using Windows? As with other addictions, informed recreational use has few drawbacks, but continual dependence on particular software is a different matter.

MIPS Technologies Joins the Linux FoundationSunday, February 22nd, 2009

Filed under
Linux

linux-foundation.org: The Linux Foundation today announced that MIPS Technologies has become a member of the Foundation. By joining the Linux Foundation, MIPS Technologies will help drive growth and promotion of Linux among its customer base and beyond.

Why an ASUS Android Netbook?

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: An Indian Web site has confirmed ASUS is developing a version of its Eee PC Netbook to run Google’s Android software. Personally I think the better story is what ASUS has against Ubuntu, but that’s just me.

Debian Lenny Based SimplyMEPIS 8.0 is Released

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org: MEPIS LLC has released SimplyMEPIS 8.0, the community edition of MEPIS 8.0. SimplyMEPIS 8.0 utilizes a Debian Lenny stable foundation enhanced with a Long Term Support kernel, key package upgrades, and the MEPIS Assistant applications.

Linux: It’s A Marketing Problem

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: The big question everyone asks when it comes to Linux is “why doesn’t everyone use it?” The answer is marketing.

Red Hat learns the white paper game

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: One of the most time-honored traditions of technology marketing is the white paper. Red Hat is learning how to play this game, but at a cost and in a manner open source can live with.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Hackable $39 Allwinner A20 SBC packs HDMI and GbE

The $39 hackable “pcDuino3Nano” SBC runs Android or Ubuntu on a dual-core Allwinner A20 SoC, and offers GbE, HDMI, and 3x USB, plus Arduino-style expansion. It appears we have a new price/performance standout in the open source single board computer game. Longmont, Colorado based LinkSprite Technologies, which hosts the open source project for Allwinner-based pcDuino SBCs, has just announced a $39 board with a set of features that would typically go for about $60. The pcDuino3Nano offers the same dual-core, 1GHz Cortex-A7 system-on-chip and all the other features of the $77 pcDuino3 SBC except for the LVDS interface, I2S stereo digital audio output, and built-in WiFi. It also adds a second USB 2.0 host port, and upgrades the LAN interface from 10/100 to 10/100/1000 Ethernet. Read more

New Video Series Teaches Kids About Linux

Growing up in rural Utah, brothers Jared and JR Neilsen spent their free time recording videos that starred a cast of homemade puppets. As adults they've reconvened to create their own web series,Hello World, which aims to teach kids about computer science. The latest segment in the series, “Superusers: The Legendary GNU/Linux Show,” is focused on teaching Linux fundamentals. Puppets Adelie the penguin and Aramis the gnu lead kids on operating system adventures to teach topics such as how to use commands, write basic shell scripts, and find a file or directory. “We wanted to do something creative and fun, merging the adventures of our youth with our current interests in computer science,” Jared Neilsen said, via email. “It's a pastiche of things we love: puppets, surreal British comedy, philosophy, music, superhero cartoons, and Linux, of course.” Read more

Google's Chrome Strategy Heads in New Directions, Draws Linux Comparisons

Google's Chrome browser and Chrome OS operating system are grabbing headlines this week for several reasons. As Susan reported here, Matt Hartley said recently, 'Anyone who believes Google isn't making a play for desktop users isn't paying attention.' Hartley favors putting Linux in front of a lot of potential Chrome OS users, and says "I consider ChromeOS to be a forked operating system that uses the Linux kernel under the hood." Read more

Alice is killing the trolls -- but expect patent lawyers to strike back

Open source software developers rejoice: Alice Corp. v CLS Bank is fast becoming a landmark decision for patent cases in the United States. The Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, which handles all appeals for patent cases in the United States, has often been criticized for its handling of these cases -- Techdirt describes it as "the rogue patent court, captured by the patent bar." But following the Alice decision, the Court of Appeals seems to have changed. Read more