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Scientific Linux 6.1 Carbon review - Almost there

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Linux

dedoimedo.com: Today's review should be all the more interesting given my spectacular delight with CentOS 6. My desktop setups rarely change, but they sure will now, with CentOS as a new addition. The only question is, can Scientific Linux fit in there as the ultimate RedHat offspring?

BackTrack 5 - A Linux Distribution Engineered for Penetration Testing

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Linux

ubuntumanual.org: Linux, which is a very versatile operating environment, caters for an array of different needs of different users. One such specific usage of Linux is in the area of computer security and penetration testing.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 419

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Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at Scientific Linux 6.1
  • News: Debian celebrates 18th birthday, CentOS provides continuous release repository, interviews with Mark Shuttleworth and Kate Stewart, Linux memoirs
  • Questions and answers: Linux versus Android and webOS
  • Released last week: Linux Mint 11 "LXDE", Arch Linux 2011.08.19, Puppy Linux 5.2.8, BlankOn Linux 7.0
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 16 Alpha
  • New distributions: Pear OS
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

The dawn of Linux: "it's just a hobby, it won't be big and professional"

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Linux

computerweekly.com: As we are celebrating 20 years of Linux this week, it seems only fitting to highlight a few milestones in the life of what has come to be (for many people) a very important piece of software development.

A Big Round of Face-Palms For HP

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Linux
Hardware

linuxinsider.com: Life tends to be pretty exciting even in an ordinary week here in the Linux blogosphere, but few can be compared with the one we just endured. Not only did we learn of Google's Motorola Mobility purchase plans on Monday, but later in the week came word of HP's mother-of-all-face-palm-inspiring acts in the form of its decision to dump pretty much everything relating to webOS.

Linux Mint Debian Edition Updates

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Linux

zdnet.co.uk: Well, it didn't take nearly as long as I thought that it would. Hot on the heels of my post about Mint Debian and updates, new base release ISO images for both the Gnome and Xfce desktops were made available at the end of last week. I find the fact that they were released together to be particularly encouraging.

Non-Windows Operating Systems for the Beginner

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Linux
Microsoft

darkduck.com: Windows is by far the most commonly used operating system, with over 95% market share. The next biggest operating system is Apple's OS X. The second most popular alternative to Windows is Linux.

The sad state of the Linux Desktop

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Linux

hboeck.de: Some days ago it was reported that Microsoft declared it considers Linux on the desktop no longer a threat for its business. Now I usually wouldn't care that much what Microsoft is saying, but in this case, I think, they're very right – and thererfore I wonder why this hasn't raised any discussions in the free software community.

Is the Linux media too negative?

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Linux

linux-magazine.com: "Is it useful to spend time concentrating on the negatives in FOSS when we have not only a tremendous number of positive events occurring but many detractors who are willing to do the negativity thing for us? Why do we reward failure and negative reactions with press coverage when thriving and positive efforts struggle for valuable attention?"

First Impressions of Puppy Linux Lucid 5.2.8

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Linux

garryconn.com: I installed Puppy Linux on my Dell XPS M1530 without any programs. Everything worked instantly, including my WLAN card. Within minutes I installed Chrome, setup syncing, and was off to my blog to write a post about it. Pupply Linux is packed full of features, games, tools, and utilities.

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Samsung still undecided on their Android Wear future

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Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition review

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