Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

The Ever-Nimble, Mobile Linux

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk.com: I know that not many people ever believed it, but the old complaint about free software never innovating is being disproved magnificently in a whole new field: mobile phones.

What is the Best Distribution of Linux?

Filed under
Linux

webhostingrating.com: Linux comes in a wide variety of flavors, better known as distributions. Such an array can make choosing between them very difficult for both the experienced administrator as well as the new user migrating from a different operating system. Making a decision isn’t easy, but we will do our best to simplify the process of selecting the ideal Linux distribution for your needs.

Ulteo Open Virtual Desktop 2.0 released

Filed under
Linux
Software
Web

h-online.com: Gaël Duval, Mandrake Linux and Ulteo founder, has announced the availability of version 2.0 of the Ulteo Open Virtual Desktop (OVD). Ulteo is based on Debian and Ubuntu and allows users to run Linux and Microsoft windows applications from "any device" through a web browser.

You always can install things yourself…

Filed under
Linux

technologytales.com: With Linux distributions offering you everything on a plate, there is a temptation to stick with what they offer rather than taking things into your own hands.

Getting to the Heart of the Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk.com: If you ever wondered how the Linux kernel is put together, here's an excellent description (complete with historical context) from Greg Kroah-Hartman, who knows it from the inside:

10 Things I Hate About Linux

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: It's hard for me to admit it but there are things, ten things to be exact, that I really hate about Linux.

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.32 (Part 4) - Drivers

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: The forthcoming Linux version 2.6.32 comes with numerous new and improved drivers – for instance for the Hauppauge HVR 2200 and 2250, for some ThinkPad notebooks by IBM/Lenovo, and for the MSI Wind's fingerprint reader.

Red Hat increases stock-ownership rules for executives

Filed under
Linux

newsobserver.com: Raleigh software company Red Hat will soon require its top executives to own more of its shares, creating added financial incentive for them to help the stock rise.

Advisory Against WiFi Drivers in Linux Staging Tree

Filed under
Linux
Software
Security

ubuntu-user.com: Dan Williams, Red Hat collaborator and NetworkManager developer, might be upset but doesn't let it get to him. In the GNOME blog, he advises "just say no" to WiFi drivers in the linux-staging tree and recommends changes.

My life with Linux: Day 3

Filed under
Linux

pcauthority.com.au: Stuart Turton spends the third day of his one week odyssey with Linux, fighting Fedora monitor hassles, wishing for Ubuntu at work and discovers that forums can be a Linux user's new best friend.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) Gets Its First Linux Kernel Update

The first kernel update for the Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) operating system arrived on May 5 and it patched a very important vulnerability in the upstream Linux kernel 3.19. As such, all Ubuntu 15.04 users are urged to update their systems as soon as possible. Read more

5 Best Android Phones [May, 2015]

Those looking for a new Android phone in the month of May are going to find themselves staring at a number of solid options. With that in mind, we want to help narrow things down for those that are need of some assistance. Here, we take a look at the device’s we think represent the best Android phones for May, 2015. Last month, Samsung and HTC released their new 2015 flagships into the wild. The Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge, Samsung Galaxy S6, and HTC One M9 join a crowded field of competitors tempting those looking for a new Android phone this month. They will soon be joined by an LG G4, a device that’s set to replace the popular LG G3 in June. Read more

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

Alexander Holler wanted to make it much harder for anyone to recover deleted data. He didn't necessarily want to outwit the limitless resources of our governmental overlords, but he wanted to make data recovery harder for the average hostile attacker. The problem as he saw it was that filesystems often would not actually bother to delete data, so much as they would just decouple the data from the file and make that part of the disk available for use by other files. But the data would still be there, at least for a while, for anyone to recouple into a file again. Alexander posted some patches to implement a new system call that first would overwrite all the data associated with a given file before making that disk space available for use by other files. Since the filesystem knew which blocks on the disk were associated with which files, he reasoned, zeroing out all relevant data would be a trivial operation. Read more

8 Linux Security Improvements In 8 Years

At a time when faith in open source code has been rocked by an outbreak of attacks based on the Shellshock and Heartbleed vulnerabilities, it's time to revisit what we know about Linux security. Linux is so widely used in enterprise IT, and deep inside Internet apps and operations, that any surprises related to Linux security would have painful ramifications. In 2007, Andrew Morton, a no-nonsense colleague of Linus Torvalds known as the "colonel of the kernel," called for developers to spend time removing defects and vulnerabilities. "I would like to see people spend more time fixing bugs and less time on new features. That's my personal opinion," he said in an interview at the time. Read more