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Watch: Security Researchers Use Ubuntu Linux to Hack ROS-Powered Surgical Robots

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Linux
Ubuntu

Today we're continuing our "Watch" series of articles with a new one where you'll be able to see a group of security researchers attempting to hack a surgical robot, courtesy of Motherboard.

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You Can Now Upgrade from Linux Mint 17.3 Cinnamon and MATE to Linux Mint 18

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GNU
Linux

Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" computer operating system arrived two weeks ago, on June 30, with the usual Cinnamon and MATE editions, but an upgrade patch was not available for users running Linux Mint 17.3 "Rosa".

Today, July 14, 2016, Linux Mint project leader Clement Lefebvre informs the community that the upgrade path from Linux Mint 17.3 "Rosa" to Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" is now open and they can start upgrading their operating systems as we speak, following the instructions provided below.

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Samsung Gear Manager updated for Tizen Smartwatches to Version 2.2.16070451

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Linux

Today, the Gear Manager app, which is used to connect a Smartphone with the Gear Smartwatches, has received another update, taking it to version 2.2.16070451. There is no changelog at the moment so this possibly the usual bug-fixes and performance improvements.

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Ubuntu MATE, Pithos and the Sounds of Popcorn

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GNU
Linux

My trusty old Sony Vaio laptop has been saddled up with Ubuntu MATE for a little over a month now. For the most part, it’s running just as smoothly as it ever did on Windows XP — and definitely better than it ran with the lovingly installed bloatware that came included with it shiny and new from the factory.

Upon the suggestion of FOSS Force reader Jeff, I invested in a recent upgrade of RAM that fulfills its maximum potential of a single gigabyte. Compared to its performance in the past, it’s definitely noticeable. But compared to my main work computer with a humble (by modern standards) 4 GB RAM, it can feel a little sluggish if I try to do do something unreasonable — like having two programs open at once.

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Devices and Hardware (Linux and Hacker-Friendly)

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Linux
Hardware
OSS
  • 8 open source point of sale systems

    Running a small business isn't easy, and especially so for retailers, restaurant owners, and others who have a brick-and-mortar storefront. Managing purchases and cash flow, keeping inventory stocked, making sure your employees are happy, and above all else serving your customers needs requires dedication, a solid business plan, and a bit of luck to be successful.

  • ELC video explains the mystery of modern caches

    In his recent ELC talk, ARM kernel developer Mark Rutland traced the evolution of caches over the last decade or so, and explained how to manage them.

    “If you’re a bit tired, this is a presentation on cache maintenance, so there will be plenty of opportunity to sleep,” began Rutland. Despite this warning, Rutland’s presentation, titled Embedded Linux Conference presentation titled Stale Data, or How We (Mis-)manage Modern Caches, was actually kind of an eye opener — at least as far as cache management presentations go.

  • This open source CNC system integrates high-tech automation into backyard farming

    This story might more properly belong on RobotHugger, but with its open source DIY approach to small-scale food production, FarmBot is worth a look.

    The old-school gardener in me is battling my high-tech early adopter side over whether or not this robotic farming device is a step toward greater food sovereignty or toward a dystopian future where robot overlords rule backyard farms. Sure, it's easy enough to learn to garden the old fashioned way, on your hands and knees with your hands in the soil, but considering that one of the excuses for not growing some our own food is lack of time and lack of skills and knowledge, perhaps this automated and optimized small-scale farming approach could be a feasible solution for the techie foodies who would like homegrown food without having to have a green thumb.

  • Tropical Labs Offers a Powerful Open Source Servo for Makers

    Joe Church from Tropical Labs wanted low cost, accurate servo motors for a project but was unable to find the right parts for his need. The team began to develop motors and recording their progress on hackaday.io. The motor project eventually turned into Mechaduino, and Tropical Labs is running a highly successful Kickstarter campaign to fund the first run of production motors.

  • SiFive – the open-source hardware company

    Customisation periods end with ICs becoming complex and expensive and, at that point, standardisation comes in and returns ICs to affordability.

    Or that’s the theory.

    Over the years there have been many ways to bring the cost of custom silicon down – MPW, ASIC, P-SOC, FPGAs and, latterly, ARM’s offer of free access to Cortex-M0 processor IP through DesignStart which aims to deliver test chips for $16,000.

Kernel Space: Linux and Graphics

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Linux
  • Automotive Grade Linux Releases 2.0 Spec Amid Growing Support
  • Linux Has Seen 30k+ Commits So Far This Year

    Being half-way now through the year and Linux 4.7 coming later this month, I figured it would be fun to run some statistics on the Linux kernel Git repository to see how this year is stacking up compared to past years.

    When running GitStats on the mainline kernel tree as of yesterday, there were 21,718,865 lines of code reported across 603,345 commits by 15,430 different authors.

  • Thunderbolt Networking Support Is Still Being Worked On For Linux

    Thunderbolt networking support is still being worked on for the mainline Linux kernel.

    The set of patches for implementing Thunderbolt networking for Linux is up to its third revision. These patches are for enabling networking of computer-to-computer over a Thunderbolt cable for non-Apple hardware. This adds the Thunderbolt networking support for hardware with a firmware-based controller, namely the Intel Connection Manager (ICM). These Linux kernel patches continue to be worked on by Intel with Amir Levy sending them out.

  • NVIDIA Releases "The World's Most Advanced VR Game", Will Be Open-Sourced
  • Why We Made the World’s Most Advanced VR Game – NVIDIA VR Funhouse

    Today’s release of NVIDIA VR Funhouse extends our role in the gaming ecosystem to that of a game creator.

    Our first game, NVIDIA VR Funhouse is built on Epic’s Unreal Engine 4, and is the brainchild of NVIDIA’s LightSpeed Studios. It was created with a dual-purpose.

    First, we wanted it to be fun. To be enjoyed by people of all ages, whether or not they’ve tried VR, whether or not they’re an early adopter.

    Second, it was created to show how immersive VR can be when physics simulation is fully integrated into an experience.

  • Intel Has A Final Round Of Graphics Updates For Linux 4.8, Broxton Is Ready

    Daniel Vetter of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has submitted the final round of feature updates for the i915 DRM driver for DRM-Next to in turn target the Linux 4.8 kernel.

    The Intel DRM code already had some pull requests of material in DRM-Next for Linux 4.8. The previous pulls included work on DisplayPort++ dongles, more GuC stuff, panel-related work and one end-user feature that's new is the GVT-g para-virtualization support for Broadwell and newer.

  • The Founder Of Wayland Has Joined Google

    Last week we reported on Kristian Høgsberg, the founder of Wayland and a long-time Linux graphics developer, leaving his position at Intel. We now know he headed off to Google.

    Through his LinkedIn profile he has confirmed that he's now working for Google in the Portland area as a software engineer.

GNU/Linux Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux 2017 – The Road to Hell

    The Year of Linux is the year that you look at your distribution, compare to the year before, and you have that sense of stability, the knowledge that no matter what you do, you can rely on your operating system. Which is definitely not the case today. If anything, the issues are worsening and multiplying. You don’t need a degree in math to see the problem.

    I find the lack of consistency to be the public enemy no. 1 in the open-source world. In the long run, it will be the one deciding factor that will determine the success of Linux. Sure, applications, but if the operating system is not transparent, people will not choose it. They will seek simpler, possibly less glamorous, but ultimately more stable solutions, because no one wants to install a patch and dread what will happen after a reboot. It’s very PTSD. And we know Linux can do better than that. We’ve seen it. Not that long ago. That’s all.

  • Voice of the Masses: How did you discover Linux?

    For our next podcast, we want to hear how you got into GNU/Linux. Where did your journey begin? Maybe you saw it on the coverdisc of a magazine somewhere, or a friend recommended that you try it. Perhaps your company switched to Linux which encouraged you to install it at home, or you simply became so enraged with Windows that you had to find something else.

Linux Kernel 4.1.28 LTS Is a Massive Update with XFS, MIPS and ARM Improvements

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Linux

Linux kernel developer Sasha Levin has announced the release of the twenty-eighth maintenance update for the Linux 4.1 long-term supported kernel series, version 4.1.28.

Linux kernel 4.1.28 LTS has been in development for the past three weeks since the June 23 debut of the previous maintenance release, Linux 4.1.27 LTS. During all this time, it has received a huge number of improvements, updated drivers, and core kernel changes. According to the appended shortlog, the update changes a total of 334 files, with 3,165 insertions and 2,032 deletions.

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Also: H.264 VA-API Encode Comes To Gallium3D

AT&T's ECOMP code to land soon at Linux Foundation

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Linux

AT&T says it's just about ready to release its virtualisation automation software, amounting to more than eight million lines of code: its Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy platform – ECOMP – will soon land at the Linux Foundation.

The company says the platform is the basis for its target to virtualise 75 per cent of its network by 2020, something chief strategy officer John Donovan says is necessary to respond to huge and unpredictable traffic growth.

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Also: AT&T ECOMP SDN platform move to open source community

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  • Apache Graduates Another Big Data Project to Top Level
    For the past year, we've taken note of the many projects that the Apache Software Foundation has been elevating to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools in recent months. As Apache moves Big Data projects to Top-Level Status, they gain valuable community support. Only days ago, the foundation announced that Apache Kudu has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). Kudu is an open source columnar storage engine built for the Apache Hadoop ecosystem designed to enable flexible, high-performance analytic pipelines. And now, Apache Twill has graduated as well. Twill is an abstraction over Apache Hadoop YARN that reduces the complexity of developing distributed Hadoop applications, allowing developers to focus more on their application logic.
  • Spark 2.0 takes an all-in-one approach to big data
    Apache Spark, the in-memory processing system that's fast become a centerpiece of modern big data frameworks, has officially released its long-awaited version 2.0. Aside from some major usability and performance improvements, Spark 2.0's mission is to become a total solution for streaming and real-time data. This comes as a number of other projects -- including others from the Apache Foundation -- provide their own ways to boost real-time and in-memory processing.
  • Why Uber Engineering Switched from Postgres to MySQL
    The early architecture of Uber consisted of a monolithic backend application written in Python that used Postgres for data persistence. Since that time, the architecture of Uber has changed significantly, to a model of microservices and new data platforms. Specifically, in many of the cases where we previously used Postgres, we now use Schemaless, a novel database sharding layer built on top of MySQL. In this article, we’ll explore some of the drawbacks we found with Postgres and explain the decision to build Schemaless and other backend services on top of MySQL.
  • GNU Hyperbole 6.0.1 for Emacs 24.4 to 25 is released
    GNU Hyperbole (pronounced Ga-new Hi-per-bo-lee), or just Hyperbole, is an amazing programmable hypertextual information management system implemented as a GNU Emacs package. This is the first public release in 2016. Hyperbole has been greatly expanded and modernized for use with the latest Emacs 25 releases; it supports GNU Emacs 24.4 or above. It contains an extensive set of improvements that can greatly boost your day-to-day productivity with Emacs and your ability to manage information stored across many different machines on the internet. People who get used to Hyperbole find it helps them so much that they prefer never to use Emacs without it.
  • Belgium mulls reuse of banking mobile eID app
    The Belgium government wants to reuse ‘Belgian Mobile ID’ a smartphone app for electronic identification, developed by banks and telecom providers in the country. The eID app could be used for eGovernment services, and the federal IT service agency, Fedict, is working on the app’s integration.
  • Water resilience that flows: Open source technologies keep an eye on the water flow
    Communities around the world are familiar with the devastation brought on by floods and droughts. Scientists are concerned that, in light of global climate change, these events will only become more frequent and intense. Water variability, at its worst, can threaten the lives and well-beings of countless people. Sadly, humans cannot control the weather to protect themselves. But according to Silja Hund, a researcher at the University of British Columbia, communities can build resilience to water resource stress. Hund studies the occurrence and behavior of water. In particular, she studies rivers and streams. These have features (like water volume) that can change quickly. According to Hund, it is essential for communities to understand local water systems. Knowledge of water resources is helpful in developing effective water strategies. And one of the best ways to understand dynamic water bodies like rivers is to collect lots of data.