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Linux

My dog is more Linux than your dog

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Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: Is there really a way for any one distro to be "more Linux' than another? Possibly the answer is yes and no, right down the middle.

Move over Tux; it's time for Tuz the Tassie Devil

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Linux

itwire.com: Ever socially aware, Linux has a new mascot for a short while. Tuz will instead embrace the boot screen of many a distro in kernel 2.6.29.

2009 and still in fear of using new hardware in GNU/Linux!

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Linux

When the GNU/Linux revolution started reaching the masses, around 2000, I predicted that by 2010 there would be full vendor support for the free operating system. Well, it’s 2009, and I have to admit it — I am feeling nervous. Read the full article at Freesoftware Magazine.

Get prepared for the inevitable with automated backups

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Linux

No excuses: do-it-yourself, secure, distributed network backups made easy

My Distro Is Better Than Yours…. Not!

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Linux

linuxcanuck.wordpress: I read a lot of news feeds. Sometimes too many. I admit it. About 10% of what I read is new. The most tiresome ones have to be the my-distro-is-better-than-yours. Only slightly less tiresome are the Linux vs. Windows ones.

Distro Review: Debian Lenny

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Linux

danlynch.org/blog: Ok it’s time for another distro review and I’m a bit overdue with this one but I’m a big fan of Debian and when I reviewed Etch (4.0) last year I declared that if I were to finally grow up and settle down with just one distro this would be the one.

Linux Netbooks - Cheap is good

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Linux

brajeshwar.com: The Linux Netbooks are cheap, simple and small — just apt for performing the basic tasks. The future for this next wave of personal technology gadgets is simple as it doesn’t burn a hole in your pocket and has portability advantages.

Why Linux is Better

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Linux

scienceblogs.com/gregladen: Why is Linux the coolest erector set in the world, that you should be willing to pay for? In part because Linux lacks the kind of freaky design oddities that arise when the makers of the software must go to meetings with a marketing department.

Detox your Linux box!

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Linux

tuxradar.com: We like to install things. Lots of things. The net effect on the average Linux installation is that things will eventually start to break. It might not be in the first six months, or even the first year, but there will be a point when things start to fail.

Oracle: We're Not Forking Red Hat Linux

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Linux

earthweb.com: For the last two and a half years, Oracle has been selling its own supported version of Linux based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. But the company claims it's not a fork.

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More in Tux Machines

Mir 0.8 Works On Less ABI Breakage, Touchspots, Responsiveness

While Ubuntu 14.10 on the desktop isn't using Mir by default, Mir 0.8.0 is being prepared for release by Canonical and it has a number of interesting changes. Read more

Open source history, present day, and licensing

Looking at open source softwares particularly, this is a fact that is probably useful to you if you are thinking about business models, many people don't care about it anymore. We talk about FOSS, Free and Open Source Software, but if we really are strict there's a difference between free software and open source software. On the left, I have free software which most typically is GPL software. Software where the license insures freedom. It gives freedoms to you as a user, but it also requires that the freedoms are maintained. On the right-hand side, you have open source software which is open for all, but it also allows you to close it. So here we come back to the famous clause of the GPL license, the reciprocity requirement which says, "If I am open, you need to be open." So software that comes under the GPL license carries with it something that other people call a virus. I call it a blessing because I think it's great if all software becomes open. Read more

Mozilla Wants to Save the Open Web, but is it Too Late?

Again, I think this is absolutely correct. But what it fails to recognise is that one of the key ways of making the Web medium "less free and open" is the use of legally-protected DRM. DRM is the very antithesis of openness and of sharing. And yet, sadly, as I reported back in May, Mozilla has decided to back adding DRM to the Web, starting first with video (but it won't end there...) This means Mozilla's Firefox is itself is a vector of attack against openness and sharing, and undermines its own lofty goals in the Open Web Fellows programme. Read more

Open source is starting to make a dent in proprietary software fortunes

Open source has promised to unseat proprietary competitors for decades, but the cloud may make the threat real. Read more