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Rolling-release testing

Filed under
GNU
Linux

At the time of writing each operating system in my trial has been up and running for a few days. About once a week I will update each system and take note of what does or does not work. At the moment I plan to focus on whether each system is still able to boot after an update, whether I will be able to login to a graphical desktop and browse the web using Firefox and edit documents using LibreOffice. I am open to suggestions as to other tests readers may want me to perform. During this trial I will be posting observations on events as they happen on my Twitter feed as regular updates seem appropriate for a trial involving rolling-release distributions. I will also post updates on the experience here on weeks when something of significance happens.

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3.8 Million Raspberry Pi Linux Computers Sold - Oh My!

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Linux

I own three Raspberry Pi's (two B's and one B+) and many people I know also own one or more Pis. All those Pi add up and now the Raspberry Pi Foundation says that it has sold 3.8 million units.

That's a whole lot of Pi.

The Raspberry Pi was never supposed to be a massive volume seller. It was supposed to be a teaching and educational tool to help get kids (and adults) interested in development and maker culture.

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Now, Zen Mobile to launch low cost Firefox smartphone in October

Filed under
Linux
Moz/FF

Just few weeks into the unveiling of the first Firefox OS device in the the Indian market, Mozilla announced further partnerships with popular mobile device brands and app partners in India to launch new smartphones and content services.

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CAINE Linux Distribution Helps Investigators With Forensic Analysis

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Linux

There is no shortage of Linux distributions to serve specific markets and use cases. In the security market, a number of Linux distributions are widely used, including Kali Linux, which is popular with security penetration testers. There's also CAINE Linux, which is focused on another area of security. CAINE, an acronym for Computer Aided INvestigative Environment, is a Linux distribution for forensic investigators. Instead of penetration testing tools, CAINE is loaded with applications and tools to help investigators find the clues and data points that are required for computer security forensics. Among the tools included in CAINE are memory, database and network analysis applications. CAINE is built on top of the Ubuntu Linux 14.04 distribution that was released in April. Rather than use the Ubuntu Unity desktop environment, CAINE uses the MATE desktop. The CAINE 6.0 "Dark Matter" operating system was first released on Oct. 7 and includes new and updated applications to help forensics investigators. CAINE can be run as a live image from a CD or USB memory stick and can also be installed onto a user's hard drive. In this slide show, eWEEK examines some of the key features of CAINE 6.

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Machine vision COM and cameras go Linux

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Linux

Vision Components has launched two Linux-based, smart machine vision cameras and a COM built around a Xilinx Zynq SoC, each supporting up to 4.2MP video.

Over the last decade, smart cameras for machine vision have been transitioning from DSPs to systems that combine DSPs or FPGAs with ARM or x86 processors running Linux. The latest to join the Linux camp is Ettlingen, Germany based machine vision manufacturer Vision Components, which with its latest “VC Z” cameras has switched from a DSP-based system to a tuxified ARM/FPGA combo. Thanks to the Xilinx Zynq, the company was able to accomplish this with a single system-on-chip. The VC Z is available in a VCSBC nano Z computer-on-module, which also appears to act as the foundation for the new VC nano Z and VC pro Z cameras.

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And Now for Something Completely Different

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Similarly, "there is no answer better than, 'any distro that works for you, has more than two users and has good information and forums online,'" suggested Google+ blogger Gonzalo Velasco C.

For fans of free and open source software, "the present year has been one of philosophical questioning about the future of GNU/Linux, freedom of choice and 'market' share," he pointed out. "So, the answers will reflect this."

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Scientific Linux 7.0 x86_64 released

Filed under
Linux

Fermilab's intention is to continue the development and support of
Scientific Linux and refine its focus as an operating system for
scientific computing. Today we are announcing the release of Scientific
Linux 7.

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Wind River Linux taps Yocto 1.7, adds binary option

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Linux

Wind River announced a new version of Wind River Linux based on Yocto Project 1.7 code, and featuring new binary deployment and security assessment options.

Intel subsidiary Wind River announced Wind River Linux 7 at the Linux Foundation’s combination LinuxCon + CloudOpen + Embedded Linux Conference Europe, being held this week in Düsseldorf, Germany. The latest version of the leading commercial Linux distribution was upgraded to version 6 with Yocto Project 1.5 a year ago at the same event.

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Is the TouchWiz successor, Iconic UX coming to Android and Tizen ?

Filed under
Android
Linux

There is no confirmation that this new UX is headed to Android and some even say that it is destined for the Tizen OS. Either way, as a strategy going forward it would make sense having the same UX on both platforms, making it easier for your Google Android customers to come across to the Tizen platform, and become your customers, paying you a share of the apps, music and videos that they purchase, sounds very nice indeed.

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[GIT PULL] xfs: updates for 3.18-rc1

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Linux

Hi Linus,

Can you please pull the current XFS updates from the tree below?
The changes outlined in the tag description include everything that
is not in your tree, but I has a question about that because there
are commits in the branch that are already in your tree.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: ThreadStack and Qt for WebAssembly

  • ThreadStack: Yet Another C++ Project Trying To Make Multi-Threading Easier
    ThreadStack is yet another C++ project trying to make it easier dealing with multiple CPU threads. This latest open-source C++ threading project comes out of academia research. ThreadStack is self-described by its developer, Erkam Murat Bozkurt, as "an innovative software which produces a class library for C++ multi-thread programming and the outcome of the ThreadStack acts as an autonomous management system for the thread synchronization tasks. ThreadStack has a nice and useful graphical user interface and includes a short tutorial and code examples. ThreadStack offers a new way for multi-thread computing and it uses a meta program in order to produce an application specific thread synchronization library." Erkam has been working the rounds trying to raise awareness for this research on the GCC and LLVM mailing lists.
  • Beta for Qt for WebAssembly Technology Preview
    WebAssembly is a bytecode format intended to be executed in a web browser. This allows an application to be deployed to a device with a compliant web browser without going through any explicit installation steps. The application will be running inside a secure sandbox in the web browser, making it appropriate for applications that do not need full access to the device capabilities, but benefits from a swift and uncomplicated installation process.
  • Qt for WebAssembly Tech Preview Reaches Beta
    As part of next month's Qt 5.11 tool-kit update, a new technology preview module will be WebAssembly support for running Qt5 user-interfaces within your web-browser.

today's howtos

Kernel and Graphics: BUS1, Linux 4.17 RC2, Wayland's Weston and Mesa

  • BUS1 Still Remains Out Of The Mainline Linux Kernel, But DBus-Broker Continues
    The BUS1 in-kernel IPC mechanism born out of the ashes of KDBUS still hasn't been mainlined in the Linux kernel, but its code is still improved upon from time to time. At least though DBus-Broker as a new performance-oriented D-Bus implementation continues gaining ground in user-space. DBus-Broker was announced last year as a new message bus implementation of D-Bus focused on high performance and reliability while continuing to offer compatibility with the original D-Bus implementation.
  • Linux 4.17-rc2 Kernel Released With Mostly Routine Changes
    Linus Torvalds has announced the availability of the second weekly test release for what is becoming the Linux 4.17 kernel.
  • Wayland's Weston Gets Optimizations For Its Pixman Renderer
    Wayland's Weston reference compositor with its Pixman software-based renderer back-end has received a number of performance optimizations. Fabien Lahoudere of Collabora posted a set of patches today to optimize the Pixman renderer for Weston. In particular, there are optimizations around compositing damage to the screen as well as optimizing the shadow buffer usage. The Weston Pixman renderer is often used as a software accelerated fallback in cases where no GPU hardware acceleration may be available. As implied by the name, it uses the long-standing Pixman library that is also used by Cairo, the X.Org Server, etc, for pixel manipulation on the CPU.
  • Panfrost Gallium3D Driver For ARM Mali Can Now Render A Cube
    The Panfrost open-source driver project previously known as "Chai" for creating an open-source 3D driver stack for ARM's Mali Midgard hardware now has a working shaded cube being rendered using the open-source code as part of its new "half-way" driver based on Gallium3D.

Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28

  • The state of Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28
    Fedora 28 is around the corner and I wanted to highlight what we did to make the Thunderbolt 3 experience as smooth as possible. Although this post focuses on Fedora 28 for what is currently packaged and shipping, all changes are of course available upstream and should hit other distributions in the future.
  • Thunderbolt 3 Support Is In Great Shape For Fedora 28
    Red Hat developers have managed to deliver on their goals around improving Thunderbolt support on the Linux desktop with the upcoming Fedora 28 distribution update. This has been part of their goal of having secure Thunderbolt support where users can authorize devices and/or restrict access to certain capabilities on a per-device basis, which is part of Red Hat's Bolt project and currently has UI elements for the GNOME desktop.