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Linux Foundation: Open Source is Eating the Software World

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

In every sector of the technology world there is now an open source project that is defining that particular technology. Software drives value in nearly every industry, and open source projects are where most of that value comes from.

That’s according to Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation and one of Monday’s keynote speakers at this week’s OpenStack summit in Paris – the first in Europe. “Open source is really eating the software world,” Zemlin said, adapting the famous phrase from a 2011 Wall Street Journal OpEd by venture capitalist Mark Andreessen, titled Software is eating the world.

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The Linux desktop-a-week review: ChromeOS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

This is not a review of ChromeOS. Nor is it a discussion of the viability of using a Chromebook as your primary computer.

No, sir. We’re simply going to be looking at ChromeOS as a Desktop Environment from a usability perspective, and how it compares to the other Linux Desktop Environments I have reviewed in my “Desktop-a-week” series thus far.

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Atomic Mode-Setting Moves Along For KMS Drivers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Vetter posted his atomic mode-setting patch series in latest form on Sunday. There's the helper libraries for migrating over to atomic mode-setting and the other core/driver interface changes for this work. The description on his latest patch series is quite lengthy so check it out if you're wanting to learn some more. These patches though don't offer the actual atomic mode-setting ioctl to expose to user-space.

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Sorry, Windows Fans, but Can You Run 100 Apps at Once and Still Use the PC?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Linux distributions are always heralded as the most secure operating systems and Windows is usually left in the dust, but it's good to know that it can also perform much better in other areas, like application and memory management.

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Btrfs RAID: Built-In/Native RAID vs. Mdadm

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Linux

Last month on Phoronix I posted some dual-HDD Btrfs RAID benchmarks and that was followed by Btrfs RAID 0/1/5/6/10 testing on four Intel solid-state drives. In still testing the four Intel Series 530 SSDs in a RAID array, the new benchmarks today are a comparison of the performance when using Btrfs' built-in RAID capabilities versus setting up a Linux 3.18 software RAID with Btrfs on the same hardware/software using mdadm.

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Linux Mint 17.1 "Rebecca" Launches in November with Massive Cinnamon 2.4 Update

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Linux

Linux Mint 17.1 "Rebecca" is scheduled to launch in just a few weeks and it will arrive with a brand new version of Cinnamon, 2.4, which promises to be one of the biggest updates so far.

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Free courseware posted for Yocto on BeagleBone

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Linux

Free Electrons has posted free training materials on building an embedded Linux project using Yocto Project and OpenEmbedded on a BeagleBone Black.

The Linux Foundation’s Yocto Project has been largely supported and influenced by Intel, but it has long since evolved into a phenomenon of its own that is as at home on ARM, PowerPC, and MIPS targets as it is on x86. In fact, for its latest training course on Yocto Project and the associated OpenEmbedded build environment, Free Electrons turned to the ARM-based BeagleBone Black single board computer as the target device. The course shows how to boot root filesystems built with the Yocto Project, as well as run and debug the custom applications compiled with it.

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Elive 2.4.0 Beta Is a Combination of Debian and Enlightenment

Filed under
Linux
Debian

The developers have been hopping from one Beta version to another and it seems that it might take them forever to get to the final version, but they want to make sure that everything will work as it should for the users that will eventually try it.

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Linux 3.18-rc3

Filed under
Linux

Another week, another rc, and things aren't really shrinking the way I
would hope for...

While the patch itself is much smaller than rc2 was (no new filesystem
this rc!), there are actually more commits and more files affected.
It's all over, too.

That said, I don't think there is anything particularly horrible in
here. Lots and lots of small stuff, with drivers accounting for the
bulk of it (both in commits and in lines), but networking and core
kernel showing up too. Nothing particularly stands out.

Shortlog appended for details, please go forth and test.

Linus

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AMD's New GPU Kernel Driver Could Be Too Late For Linux 3.19

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Linux

Red Hat's David Airlie as the Linux kernel's subsystem maintainer has written a status update about his plans and thoughts for DRM graphics driver changes for the next kernel cycle, Linux 3.19.

With Linux 3.18, Airlie started cutting off the DRM-next merge requests early -- around Linux 3.17-rc5~rc6 -- rather than in the past where he's allowed new driver changes to be merged into his -next branch up until the release of the current kernel development cycle. He did this change to try to reduce the number of DRM graphics related regressions and issues that have been somewhat common when upgrading kernels. This change worked out well for Linux 3.18 and so David intends to do the same for Linux 3.19.

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today's howtos

Doxyqml 0.4.0

After almost two years, here comes a new version of Doxyqml, the QML filter for Doxygen. This new version adds a new command-line option: --namespace to wrap the generated C++ in a namespace, and makes the parser more robust. Nothing ground-breaking, but some nice changes nevertheless. What's interesting with this project is that I don't use it these days, but it still receives contributions from time to time. This puts me in the unusual position (for me) where most of my contributions to the project are reviewing code, cleaning things, a bit of infrastructure (I just added code coverage checks: 88%, not too bad) and release management. Surprisingly, I like doing this, I am happy to see this little tool remains useful enough that others keep it alive. Read more

Plasma 5.12.5, Applications 18.04.1 and Frameworks 5.46.0 by KDE now available in Chakra

On your next system upgrade you will receive all the latest versions of KDE’s Plasma, Applications and Frameworks, in addition to several other package updates. For more details and the full changelogs on KDE’s software releases, you can read the official announcements: Plasma 5.12.5 Applications 18.04.1 Frameworks 5.46.0 Other noteworthy package updates include wine 3.8, skypeforlinux 8.20.0.9 and pypy 6.0.0. Read more

SMTube review - Your train to Youtube

It's a no brainer. On the desktop, you go online, and you open a tab and you load Youtube, and then you play clips. But then, on mobile devices, you have dedicated applications, which usually offer a somewhat more efficient media experience. So, on the desktop, it's the browser way or the ... SMTube way? SMTube is a cross-platform Youtube player, which allows you to search and play videos from the popular media platform, with some additional search tweaks and filters, and extra download options, all this from the desktop, without having to keep a browser tab open. It's a convenient tool to use, and with the recent rewrite, it actually works, and it works fairly well. I decided to test to see what gives. [...] SMTube looks like a nice tool. It is not strictly necessary or needed, but it does allow you to have Youtube open and playing, even if you're not currently using your browser, i.e. you can use it like any other media player. This is nice, plus you get a clean and intuitive interface, decent search and filter options, and it's easy to change settings and configure additional players. You also have the option to download clips. I don't know where SMTube stands when it comes to Google, Youtube, but ordinary users will surely appreciate the extra flexibility they get with a media player rather than just a browser tab. Of course, you're not signed in, you don't get recommendations, comments or playlists, and such, so I guess there are benefits to going directly to Youtube. But if you're only after what Youtube can play without any socializing, SMTube is an excellent choice. It's had a rough ride, it never quite fully worked for me in my various distro reviews, but this new version is stable, robust and works well. At the very least, it's worth testing. Choo choo. Read more