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Linux and windows people are the same

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Linux
Microsoft

toolbox.com/blogs: There is a common belief propagated around the web that Linux users are a different breed of people than windows users. In the beginning of Linux history that would have been true. These days it is not.

Lenono IdeaCentre Q100

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Linux
Hardware

linuxuser.co.uk: A low-cost nettop PC designed primarily for accessing the Internet, the Lenovo IdeaCentre Q100 is an ideal computer for knowledge workers and end-user quality assurance testing. As a primary development system, the Q100 lacks graphics power, is low on RAM, and has a slow processor.

What Lies at the Heart of "Avatar"?

Filed under
Linux
Movies

opendotdotdot.blogspot: It takes a lot of data center horsepower to create the stunning visual effects behind blockbuster movies such as King Kong, X-Men, the Lord of the Rings trilogy and most recently, James Cameron’s $230 million Avatar.

Will Linux Survive the Global Economic Meltdown?

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Linux

daniweb.com: While companies worldwide look for ways to reduce costs, shed dead weight from their labor resources and streamline their businesses, it makes me wonder if Linux will survive the global economic meltdown.

10+ free, fast-booting Linux distros that aren't Chrome OS

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Linux

downloadsquad.com: Sure, Chrome OS has been all over the headlines since early December. But it might not run on your hardware and you're going to have to wait at least a year for the final version. Why bother waiting?

Linux 2019

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Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: No matter how often I see it, I still can't get used to people typing into tables. Bad enough that people are always mumbling to themselves -- cut cells C3-C7, paste to D3-D7 -- but the constant drumming of fingers is just annoying. And please, don't get me started on people wearing iContact lens!

Distro Review: Linux Mint 8

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Linux

danlynch.org/blog: Today I’d like to talk to you about Linux Mint 8, AKA Helena. I’ve said this many times before, but the codenames still sound a little tacky to me. The distro itself is anything but tacky though and it’s been one of my firm favourites in the past. How would this release stack up?

Linux on Netbooks - with Pictures

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Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: As this is the holiday season, and things are slow, I have finally taken the time to follow up on some very good advice that Jake gave me, so here is a quick review of some of the most common Netbook-centric Linux distributions.

Christmas wish: Distro hardware buyer’s guide

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Linux

blogs.gnome.org: As a long time free software user, every time I buy hardware I have the same decision paralysis. Will the graphics card be fully supported? Are the drivers stable? Will the on-board wifi, sound card, and the built-in webcam Just Work?

My plan for fixing the current audio mess in Linux

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Linux

pdavila.homelinux.org: So sound issues STILL plague Linux in general. I think we can all agree that the decision to make Pulse Audio the default sound daemon in Linux has resulted in mixed results at best. While the creator of Pulse Audio has repeatably claimed the issue was entirely the fault of Linux distribution maintainers for not implementing it properly it still continues to be an eyesore more than 3 years since it was first introduced.

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Chromixium – An Ubuntu Based Google’s Chrome OS Clone

Today, We have come up with an interesting news for both Ubuntu and Chrome OS users. Meet Chromixium – the new modern desktop operating system based on Ubuntu that has the functionality, look and feel of Google’s “Chrome OS”. Chromixium has brought the elegant simplicity of Chromebook and flexibility and stability of Ubuntu together. Chromixium puts the web front and center of the user experience. Web and Chrome apps work straight out of the browser to connect you to all your personal, work and education networks. Sign into Chromium to sync all your apps and bookmarks. When you are offline or when you need more power, you can install any number of applications for work or play, including LibreOffice, Skype, Steam and a whole lot more. Security updates are installed seamlessly and effortlessly in the background and will be supplied until 2019. You can install Chromixium in place of any existing operating system, or alongside Windows or Linux. Read more

BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review: A promising start

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Enabling Open Source SDN and NFV in the Enterprise

I recently attended the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) in Shenzhen, China, to promote Intel’s software defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) software solutions. During this year’s IDF, Intel has made several announcements and our CEO Brian Krzanich showcased Intel’s innovation leadership across a wide range of technologies with our local partners in China. On the heel of Krzanich’s announcements, Intel Software & Services Group Senior VP Doug Fisher extended Krzanich’s message to stress the importance of open source collaboration to drive industry innovation and transformation, citing OpenStack and Hadoop as prime examples. Read more Also: Myth-Busting the Open-Source Cloud Part 2