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"Sorry, but your system does not meet the minimum system requirements"

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Linux Sorry, but your system does not meet the minimum system requirements (Adobe). The all-new Yahoo! Mail has not been tested with your operating system (Yahoo). What do these two messages have in common?

Debian move to increase project members

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Linux The Debian GNU/Linux project has announced that it will be welcoming as full project members those who make a contribution other than packaging applications.

Linpus Lite 1.4 review

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Linux Linpus Lite is the distribution for netbooks and smartbooks developed and maintained by Linpus Technologies, Inc. of Taipei, Taiwan. The company’s flagship Linux distribution used to be Linpus Desktop until it decided to focus on the Lite and QuickOS line.

Leading With Red Hat Enterprise Linux

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Linux Over the last 10 years, Red Hat has brought the software industry forward with the innovative technology delivered through our Red Hat Enterprise Linux platform.

Red Hat to post solid Q2

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  • Red Hat to post solid Q2: analyst
  • Red Hat Down 1.7% Ahead Of Tomorrow's Second Quarter Earnings Report

sidux changes to aptosid by upgrade or ISO

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Linux A press release dated September 11 came to the community's attention Monday, September 13 of the renaming or, as some reported, a fork of sidux to aptosid.

Debian Project News - September 21st

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Welcome to this year's twelfth issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Topics covered in this issue include: Linux Mint Debian Edition, Grave software bugs, and This week in Debian interviews Stefano Zacchiroli.

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.36 (Part 2) - File systems, networking and storage

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Linux 2.6.36 offers VFS optimisations, has returned to integrating Ext3 file systems with "data=ordered" by default and can store data from shared Windows or Samba disks in local cache to improve performance. Numerous new and improved drivers enhance the kernel's storage and network hardware support.

Living through the Wild West of FOSS History

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OSS Could things be more exciting in the the world of FOSS right now? Yes it could, but let's not be too hasty..

Oracle's "new" kernel for RHEL clone: The real truth

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Linux Oracle made a big noise in the Linux community yesterday by announcing its own spin on the Linux kernel on top if its so-called Unbreakable Linux. Oracle presented the announcement as offering a "modern" Linux kernel. Underneath the hype, what's Oracle really offering, and what does it mean for Linux?

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Open Document Format: Using Officeshots and ODFAutoTesting for Sustainable Documents

One of the many benefits of open source software is that it offers some protection from having programs disappear or stop working. If part of a platform changes in a non-compatible way, users are free to modify the program so that it continues to work in the new environment. At a level above the software, open standards protect the information itself. Everybody expects to be able to open a JPEG image they took with their digital camera 5 years ago. And, it is not unreasonable to expect to be able to open that same image decades from now. For example, an ASCII text file written 40 years ago can be easily viewed today. Read more