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Linux

My top 10 open source software

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Linux
OSS

I must say that they changed my life both as I started to use different software but the most important thing, in my opinion, is that I’ve discovered a different way to think to software and collaboration, or should I say understand what really means Free software ?

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Fedora 22 To Push For Requiring Packages To Have AppData

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Linux

Fedora 22 is going to require applications that want to appear within their GNOME Software Center to ship an AppData file, which is a meta-data specification for providing basic data about the program. AppData is a GNOME-backed specification based on a subset of the AppStream meta-data proposal. An AppData file comes down to an XML file that specifies the basic program information like the license, name, and descriptions of the program. Screenshots of the program can also be specified via URLs. The AppData specification can be found on this web page.

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Pear Departure, Bodhi Fundraiser, and Mageia 4 RC

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Linux

The headlines to capture my attention today include the end of the Pear OS project. Bodhi Linux is raffling off a Chromebook with Bodhi Linux installed. The Mageia 4 Release Candidate was released. Let's look at these and a few other developments around The Penguin today.

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Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.3 Gets Real

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Linux

The RHEV 3.3 release is built on top of the open-source oVirt project, which is led by Red Hat. The new release adds support for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.5 platform, improves performance and supports a wider array of systems.

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Xperia Z Ultra now available as a Wi-Fi-only ‘tablet’

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Linux

It features the same 6.5mm-thick waterproof casing, 8-megapixel camera, Android 4.2 Jelly Bean OS, Snapdragon 800 processor clocked at 2.3GHz, 2GB of RAM and a 3000mAh battery as found on the regular Xperia Z Ultra.

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Wayland reaches version 1.4 RC

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Linux

The first release candidate for Wayland 1.4 is out now. Designed by Kristian Høgsberg, Wayland is a protocol for a compositor to talk to its clients as well as a C library implementation of that protocol. It is intended as a simpler replacement for X, easier to develop and maintain. GNOME and KDE are expected to be ported to it. Part of the Wayland project is also the Weston reference implementation of a Wayland compositor.

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Dconf 0.19.3 Brings Lots of Improvements and Fixes

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Linux

Dconf 0.19.3 introduces various improvements in the test coverage area, adds a proper DCONF_ERROR error domain, suppress the GLib deprecation warnings during the build process, correctly handles writability changes in GSettings, displays warnings about missing files only once per source, and it will link to -ldl only if it is required.

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Slitherine To Improve Linux Support

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Linux
Gaming

This is something I personally brought up with them after being gifted a copy of Pandora from the developers, it was all highly confusing as you had to specifically click the Linux link in the platform list otherwise you would be buying the Windows version and it didn't actually tell you this anywhere. They are another store who needs to note Windows and not PC though, you know how annoying it gets to see that.

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Nftables Steals the Show in Linux 3.13

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Linux

"The release got delayed by a week due to travels, but I suspect that's just as well," wrote Linux creator Linus Torvalds in the announcement email on Sunday evening. "We had a few fixes come in, and while it wasn't a lot, I think we're better off for it." The patch from the eighth release candidate is "fairly small," Torvalds added, including primarily some small architecture updates, drivers and networking fixes. The ARM, MIPS, PowerPC, SPARC and x86 architectures all saw some minor changes, he noted, including some that arose from a networking fix for the Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF) JIT.

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Red Hat Promotes Open Source Software-Defined Storage

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Linux

If the advent of object-based storage à la OpenStack Swift is one sign of the decline of traditional storage technologies, the momentum of software-defined storage is yet more evidence that the future of data storage for the cloud and the enterprise is changing. And open source giant Red Hat (RHT) is the latest vendor to jump on board, with the announcement of new software-defined storage options for Red Hat partners that could have a wide impact across the channel.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • GJS: What’s next?
    In my last post, I went into detail about all the new stuff that GJS brought to GNOME 3.24. Now, it’s time to talk about the near future: what GJS will bring to GNOME 3.26.
  • Sending SMS from Linux Just Got Easier with Latest Indicator KDE Connect Update
    Indicator KDE Connect now has Google Contacts integration, making it even easier to send text messages from the Linux desktop.
  • Cumulus Qt is a Lightweight Weather App for Linux
    Cumulus Qt is a Qt weather app for the Linux desktop. It's lightweight, has a bold, striking design inspired by Stormcloud, and is very customisable.
  • Vivaldi 1.10 Browser Now in Development, Will Introduce Docked Developer Tools
    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard just informed us a few moments ago that Vivaldi 1.10 will be the next major version of the free and cross-platform web browser based on the latest Chromium technologies, not Vivaldi 2.0 as many of you have hoped. Vivaldi 1.9 just hit the streets the other day as world's first web browser to ship with the Ecosia search engine enabled by default to help reforest the plane, and it now looks like Vivaldi's devs never sleep, and development of Vivaldi 1.10 starts today with the first snapshot, Vivaldi 1.10.829.3, which introduces a long-anticipated feature: Docked Developer Tools!

today's howtos

Fedora: The Latest (Flatpak, Wallpapers, and PHP)

  • Flatpak and Snaps aren't destined for graveyard of failed Linux tech yet
    The world of Linux has long been divided into tribes, or distros as we called them. But what actually makes a distro? The packages it uses? The people who put those packages together? The philosophy behind the choices the people who put the packages together make? The question of what makes a distro is actually very difficult on to answer and it's about to get even more difficult. There's a change coming to the world of Linux that's potentially big enough to make us rethink what a distro is and how it works. That change is Ubuntu's Snap packages and the parallel effort dubbed Flatpaks. While these two projects differ in the details, for the purposes of this article I'll consider them the same thing and use the terms interchangeably.
  • Need a New Wallpaper? Fedora 26 Has You Covered!
    Fedora 26 will ship with a stunning set of community-contributed wallpapers, and as ever, the standard of entries in the contest is incredibly high.
  • Fedora 26 will look awesome with supplemental wallpapers
  • PHP version 7.0.19RC1 and 7.1.5RC1

Tizen and Android