Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

How to Learn Linux for Free

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Ah yes, there's that all too familiar sound of tightening budgets and the tossing aside of those things perceived as non-essential. Training's death knell reverberates in my head like the sound of an ill-tuned vesper bell.

just what is the big problem with Linux?

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: A bunch of Microsoft Windows users were asked just why don't they use Linux. What's wrong with Linux? What needs to change to entice them? And I'll tell you!

It's *Not* The 15th Birthday of Linux – and Why That Matters

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Last week, I wondered whether I'd gone back in time. Everywhere I went online – on news sites, blogs and Twitter – people were celebrating the 15th birthday of Linux, it seemed. “How is this possible?”

Making The Linux Command Line A Little Friendlier

Filed under
Linux

maketecheasier.com: One thing that gets debated over and over in Linux is the need for the command line. Linux shell is one of the things that makes Linux so great.

Linux is still an adventure game, but now it's really worth playing

Filed under
Linux

guardian.co.uk: It must have been the first year of desktop Linux when I first played around with it, some time in the late 1990s. In those days we were so primitive we didn't realise that the year of desktop Linux would become an annual celebration.

Point for Point with Bruce Byfield on GNU-Linux Desktop Myths

Filed under
Linux

penguinpetes.com: Bruce Byfield has an interesting list of rebuttals for GNU-Linux myths. So here's a few thoughts to add to the points raised:

Linux file integrity: the same as Windows

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: My previous posting described how Windows 7 lets two programs update the same file at the same time, with the inevitable result, data corruption. It's an accident waiting to happen. And the same is true of Linux.

My Latest Linux Experiment

Filed under
Linux
PCLOS

lockergnome.com/blade: As I mentioned last week, I was going to give Linux another try to see what some of the latest new distributions have to offer.

The Linux Staging Tree, what it is and is not.

Filed under
Linux

kroah.com: The Linux Staging tree (or just "staging" from now on) is used to hold stand-alone drivers and filesystems that are not ready to be merged into the main portion of the Linux kernel tree at this point in time for various technical reasons.

Realistic netbook expectations

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Will half-baked Ubuntu Linux netbooks ruin the OS for consumers?

  • The quiet Ubuntu netbook revolution
  • Realistic netbook expectations
  • Netbooks, Linux and the Lenovo S10
  • No SUSE Linux for ARM netbooks: Novell
  • Linux on netbooks to fall below 10% in 2009
  • Linux losing ground on netbooks
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Build Support Improved For Libdrm

Emil Velikov, the new Mesa release manager, just landed a large set of libdrm patches for improving the open-source graphics drivers for Android. Emil enabled Android build support within Mesa's DRM library (libdrm) for the Intel driver along with the Freedreno (reverse-engineered Qualcomm Adreno), Nouveau, and Radeon drivers. Up to now any Android support wasn't part of mainline libdrm and landed today in time for the next update, libdrm v2.4.57. At this time there's no Android updates to talk about for the Mesa/Gallium3D drivers themselves. The new Mesa release manager has also been working on some other Mesa build improvements recently like working on make dist support. Read more

THE AWESOMELY EPIC GUIDE TO KDE

Desktops on Linux. They’re a concept completely alien to users of other operating systems because they never having to think about them. Desktops must feel like the abstract idea of time to the Amondawa tribe, a thought that doesn’t have any use until you’re in a different environment. But here it is – on Linux you don’t have to use the graphical environment lurking beneath your mouse cursor. You can change it for something completely different. If you don’t like windows, switch to xmonad. If you like full-screen apps, try Gnome. And if you’re after the most powerful and configurable point-and-click desktop, there’s KDE. KDE is wonderful, as they all are in their own way. But in our opinion, KDE in particular suffers from poor default configuration and a rather allusive learning curve. This is doubly frustrating, firstly because it has been quietly growing more brilliant over the last couple of years, and secondly, because KDE should be the first choice for users unhappy with their old desktop – in particular, Windows 8 users pining for an interface that makes sense. But fear not. We’re going to use a decade’s worth of KDE firefighting to bring you the definitive guide to making KDE look good and function slightly more like how you might expect it to. We’re not going to look at KDE’s applications, other than perhaps Dolphin; we’re instead going to look at the functionality in the desktop environment itself. And while our guinea pig distribution is going to be Mageia, this guide will be equally applicable to any recent KDE desktop running from almost any distribution, so don’t let the default Mageia background put you off. Read more

The Trouble With Android

Don’t get me wrong, Android is a beautiful operating system if ever there was one – and dumbed down to the max, which makes it even more beautiful in the minds of many mobile users. Indeed, you can play on an Android device all day without ever even realizing that you’re working with an operating system or even a computer. Just swipe away and see what they’ll try to sell you next. Read more

Try GNOME 3.14 Beta 1 with Wayland Without Installing Anything

GNOME is working to implement official Wayland support for the upcoming 3.14 release and they seem to be more than half way there. It's difficult to test the new GNOME 3.14 Beta updates that have been made until now, especially with the Wayland integration, but a Reddit user posted a short and easy-to-follow tutorial in this regard. Read more