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Samsung Chromebook 2 review

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GNU
Linux
Google
Reviews

Two years ago, Samsung made the first great Chromebook. It was thin, and light, and had good battery life, but most of all it was a different kind of computer. Chrome OS wasn’t like Windows, which can do absolutely everything on earth including a laundry list of things that only confuse and overwhelm most users. It was designed to be simple, functional, and focused. “It’s just a web browser” wasn’t a problem, it was progress.

As Samsung releases its successor, the Chromebook 2, things have changed. Cheap laptops can be even thinner, even faster, even more powerful, even longer-lasting; the Chromebook 2 is all four. The opportunity has grown, too: these 11.6-inch and 13.3-inch laptops enter a market in which most of what most people do all day lives inside a web browser anyway. We can do basic word processing and number-crunching with Google Docs or Office Online; we store all our files in Dropbox or OneDrive. Chrome OS feels more native than ever, but in a very real way we’ve caught up to Google’s vision more than it’s caught up to us.

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Top 7 Desktop Environment For Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Standard Linux circulations regularly default to one of two desktop environments, KDE or GNOME. Both of these give clients an instinctive and attractive desktop, and also offering a verity of media inbuilt softwares, system programs, games, utilities, web development tools, programming tools and so on. These two desktops center all the more on giving clients a cutting edge computing environment with all the accessories emphasized in Windows OS, instead of minimizing the measure of system resources they require.

If you are using Ubuntu (or other) and exhausted of utilizing Unity desktop constantly? At that point, you ought to look at different choices accessible that can swap unity for you. I have gathered 7 desktop environments that are great and you beyond any doubt would need to utilize them once you are finished with this article.

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Onstar – Remote control your car from your Tizen Samsung Gear 2

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Linux

At the Tizen Developer Conference, Onstar a General Motors subsidiary company, were showing off their car remote control solution, but with a little twist as it was working on a Samsung Gear 2, to control a lovely looking Chevrolet.

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DoodleBorg Interview

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Linux
Interviews

DoodleBorg is] running off six motorcycle starter motors. It’s using mini all-terrain vehicle wheels and has a custom chassis made out of six-millimetre thick steel that has been laser cut. It has two motorcycle batteries, and six of our wonderful PicoBorg reverse control boards which are capable of five amps per channel, ten amps in total. We’ve got them connected up, one per motor so we can individually control each of the wheels. This means we can make alternate wheels go in all sorts of directions if we want them to. There are some big crazy switches on the front that serve emergency power-offs too.

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Check out the Tizen Samsung WW9000 washing machine and its 5-inch touch screen

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Linux

Tizen is being heralded as the “OS of Everything”, and you can really see it in action on the Samsung Gear 2, Smart camera’s, and Smart TV’s . We have previously mentioned the Tizen based Samsung WW9000 washing machine, but here are some more details regarding some of its features.

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Samsung's razor-thin Galaxy Tab S takes another run at the iPad

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Android
Linux
Mac

Now Samsung’s announcing its newest tablet line, the Galaxy Tab S, available in 8.4-inch and 10.5-inch sizes. The Galaxy Tab S models are thinner, lighter, and faster than earlier efforts, and they have new Super AMOLED displays that Samsung says easily outperform their LCD-equipped counterparts. But one major thing remains the same: Samsung is very much still trying to beat the iPad.

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HTG Explains: What’s the Difference Between Linux and BSD?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

Both Linux and the BSDs are free and open-source, Unix-like operating systems. They even use much of the same software — these operating systems have more things in common than they do differences. So why do they all exist?

There are more differences than we can cover here, especially philosophical differences about the way one should build an operating system and license it. This should help you understand the basics, though.

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The New Features To The Linux 3.16 Kernel

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Linux

Linus Torvalds will most likely be releasing the Linux 3.16-rc1 kernel today, now that the merge window has been open for two weeks and the feature pull requests are coming to an end. Here's a concise look at the new features and improvements to be found with the Linux 3.16 kernel.

All of the major subsystems with updates for the Linux 3.16 merge window appear to now be addressed and Linux 3.16-rc1 is likely hours away. As I'm about to leave for Russia again, I'm writing my summary of the features I'm most interested in with the Linux 3.16 kernel and other changes/improvements that you as Phoronix readers will also be most pleased to see with this new kernel stabilizing over the summer.

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Linux Mint 17 “Qiana” Xfce RC released!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux Mint 17 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2019. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

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Windows: Another nail in the coffin?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

That system is Wine, a software “go-between” that lets users run Windows applications without a copy of Microsoft Windows. Wine isn’t an operating system in its own right, just a layer that sits on top of free systems like Linux. It doesn’t run every Windows program but offers seamless compatibility on many of the most recent and popular applications. Used in conjunction with a free graphical operating system like Ubuntu, it’s an option that could save you up to £80 on Microsoft’s current asking price.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics and Games: RandR and AMDGPU, Opus Magnum

  • "NonDesktop" Proposed For RandR: Useful For VR & Apple Touch Bar Like Devices
    Besides Keith Packard working on the concept of resource leasing for the X.Org Server and resource leasing support for RandR, he's also now proposing a "NonDesktop" property for the Resize and Rotate protocol. The resource leasing has already been worked out as a candidate for the next update, RandR 1.6, while now this veteran X11 developer is proposing a new "NonDesktop" property for identifying outputs that are not conventional displays.
  • More AMDGPU Changes Queue For Linux 4.15
    Adding to the excitement of Linux 4.15, AMD has queued some more changes that were sent in today for DRM-Next. Already for Linux 4.15, the AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager driver should have the long-awaited "DC" display stack that brings Vega/Raven display support, HDMI/DP audio, atomic mode-setting and more. Other pull requests have also brought in a new ioctl, UVD video encode ring support on Polaris, transparent huge-pages DMA support, PowerPlay clean-ups, and many fixes, among other low-level improvements.
  • Opus Magnum, the latest puzzle game from Zachtronics, is released into Early Access
    The developers behind the challenging puzzle games TIS-100 and SHENZEN I/O are at it again and have released their latest title into Steam’s Early Access today.
  • Open your wallets, there's some great Linux games on sale right now
    It's time to throw your wallet at your screen, as we're going to take a look at some awesome Linux games on sale.

System 76 and Purism Laptops

  • POP!_OS is a developer-focused minimalist Linux distro from System 76
    There aren’t that many Linux hardware manufacturers around. Of the few that exist, System 76 is amongst the most well-known. It offers a slew of laptops and desktops, all shipping with the popular Ubuntu distro pre-installed, saving customers hours of wasted time dealing with driver hell. But it recently announced it’s changing gears and creating its own Linux distro, which will replace Ubuntu on its systems, called POP!_OS.
  • Purism’s Linux laptops now ship with Intel Management Engine disabled
    Most computers that ship with recent Intel processors include something called Intel Management Engine, which enables hardware-based security, power management, and remote configuration features that are not tied to the operating system running on your PC. For free software proponents, this has been a pain in the behind, because it’s a closed-source, proprietary feature designed to provide remote access to a computer even when it’s turned off. While it’s designed to provide security, it also poses a potential security and privacy threat, since it’s a proprietary system that can only be patched by Intel
  • Purism Now Shipping Their Laptops With Intel ME Disabled
    Purism has announced today all laptops to be shipping from their company will now have the Intel Management Engine (ME) disabled. Thanks to work done by security researches in recent years for finding ways to disable ME, especially in light of recent security vulnerabilities, Purism's Coreboot-equipped laptops are now shipping with ME disabled out-of-the-box. Those already with a Librem laptop are able to apply a firmware update to also disable it.

Ubuntu Leftovers: GNOME, Birthday and More

Android Leftovers