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Linux

Seven Out of Ten Most Played Games on Steam Have Linux Support

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Valve is looking very seriously at Linux as a genuine replacement for Windows and the company has put a lot of effort into it. An interesting way of seeing just how much they care is to check the top ten most played games on Steam.

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UAS: USB Attached SCSI now available in the 3.15 kernel, qemu USB-3.0 compatibility coming up

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

At the end of 2013 I've spend 2 full months working on getting XHCI streams support and the UAS driver in the Linux kernel, which uses streams into shape. With the release of the 3.15 kernel this work now is available for end users to use.

This is good news for anyone who cares about performance of USB connected harddisks / ssds. The old usb mass-storage protocol is well known for its poor performance. UAS however allows NCQ and thus allows effectively using the full USB-3 bandwidth. If you've an UAS capable harddisk enclosure then all you need is a 3.15 kernel build with the UAS driver enabled and you should instantly get better performance. Note that most harddisk enclosures, including USB-3 enclosures do not support UAS, so if you want to use UAS double check before buying a harddisk enclosure.

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Meet Cubicle OS 2.3, a Failed Attempt at Building a Proper Linux Distribution

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Cubicle OS is a rather new operating system and it shows, especially from the way it's built. The developer chose to implement GNOME as the default desktop environment, but it looks like he didn't bother to customize it too much.

In fact, this is a rather odd operating system and it even seems that the developer is planning to make some money with it in the near future. At least this is what we can determine from his website.

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Trying Out Nouveau GPU Re-Clocking On Linux 3.16

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

With the Linux 3.16 kernel comes the ability to re-clock select NVIDIA GeForce GPUs when using the open-source, reverse-engineered Nouveau driver. Here's my first impressions with trying out this option to maximize the performance of NVIDIA graphics cards on open-source drivers.

As explained previously, the GPUs where Nouveau in Linux 3.16 will support re-clocking are the NV40, NVAA, and NVE0 GPU series. The NV40 chip family is the GeForce 6 and 7 series. The NVAA series meanwhile is part of the NV50 family but consists of just the GeForce 8100/8200/8300 mobile GPUs / nForce 700a series and 8200M G. NVE0 meanwhile is the most interesting of the bunch and consists of the Kepler (GeForce 600/700 series) GPUs. Re-clocking support for other graphics processor generations is still a work-in-progress.

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First handheld Steam Machine revealed

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

A “Steamboy” handheld gaming console teased in a video appears to be the first portable Steam Machine to emerge for Valve’s Linux-based Steam OS platform.

A Steamboy Project site registered under a Steamboy Machine copyright posted a teaser video of what looks to be the first handheld console form-factor Steam Machine (see farther below). The video shows a handheld device with a screen in the middle that resembles a cross between the now-delayed Valve Steam Controller and a Sony PlayStation Vita device.

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IFC6410 Snapdragon 600 dev board now supports Fedora, Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

The IFC6410 Pico-ITX board is a tiny computer-on-a-board powered by the same Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 processor as the Samsung Galaxy S4 or HTC One M7 smartphones. It sells for $149 and it’s aimed at developers, hobbyists, and others interested in testing their hardware or software designs… but thanks to a few recent developments, you can also use the IFC6410 as a small, inexpensive desktop computer.

It’s now possible to run Ubuntu 14.04, Fedora 20, or other desktop operating systems based on Linux on the little developer board.

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Kubuntu 14.04 LTS Users Can Test the Beautiful Plasma 5 Beta 2 Desktop

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

The new KDE Plasma 5 Beta 2 that was released only a few days ago can be tested in Kubuntu 14.04 LTS with a just a minimum of effort.

The KDE developers are preparing to release the final version of Pasma 5, the replacement of the current desktop that is being used by KDE. It's still in the Beta stages, but the final version is close. The good news is that you can now test it in Kubuntu 14.04 LTS.

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HP's The Machine Open Source OS: Truly Revolutionary

Filed under
Linux

Last week, Hewlett-Packard (HPQ) announced its plan to build a revolutionary new type of computer called The Machine. And here's what makes it truly revolutionary, in all senses of the word: The Machine will run an open source operating system developed in universities, as well as Linux and Android.

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Linux 3.16-rc1 - merge window closed

Filed under
Linux

So it's been two weeks since the merge window opened, and rc1 is out
there and thus the merge window is closed.

It may have been a slightly unusual two week merge window, in that
it's only one week since the release of 3.15 and the first week
overlapped with the last -rc for that previous release, but that
doesn't seem to have affected development much. Things look normal,
and if anything, this is one of the bigger release windows rather than
on the smaller side. It's not quite as big as the merge window for
3.15, but it's actually not that far off.

It also looks fairly usual from a statistics standpoint: about two
thirds of the changes are to drivers (and one third of *that* is to
staging), and half of the remainder is architecture updates (with arm
dominating, dts files leading - but there's mips, powerpc, x86 and
arm64 there too).

Outside of drivers and architecture updates, there's the usual mixture
of changes elsewhere: filesystems (mainly reiserfs, xfs, btrfs, nfs),
networking, "core" kernel (mm, locking, scheduler, tracing), and
tooling (perf and power, also new self-tests).

Also as usual, the shortlog is much too big to be generally useful and
posted as part of this announcement, but you can obviously look at the
details in git. I'm posting the "mergelog" as usual, which I think is
a slightly better way to see the high-level picture. And as usual, it
credits not the people who necessarily wrote the code, but the
submaintainers that sent it to me. For real credits, see the git tree.

Go forth and test,

Linus

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The history of Android: The endless iterations of Google’s mobile OS

Filed under
Android
Linux

Android has been with us in one form or another for more than six years. During that time, we've seen an absolutely breathtaking rate of change unlike any other development cycle that has ever existed. When it came time for Google to dive in to the smartphone wars, the company took its rapid-iteration, Web-style update cycle and applied it to an operating system, and the result has been an onslaught of continual improvement. Lately, Android has even been running on a previously unheard of six-month development cycle, and that's slower than it used to be. For the first year of Android’s commercial existence, Google was putting out a new version every two-and-a-half months.

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Red Hat: Satellite, OpenShift, Government, SoftBank

  • A Red Hat Satellite tutorial to install an update server
    Is server patch management the best part of your job? Stop reading here. Many IT organizations struggle with OS patching processes. For Red Hat administrators who are willing to invest some initial energy to simplify later tasks, Satellite provides infrastructure lifecycle management, including capabilities for provisioning, reporting and configuration management. To this end, follow this Red Hat Satellite tutorial to set up a simple server for updates. Once we review how to install the basic update server, we'll create one example client.
  • Red Hat updates Gluster storage for OpenShift container apps
    Red Hat bolstered Gluster storage for its OpenShift Container Platform, adding iSCSI block and S3 object interfaces, as well as greater persistent volume density.
  • Red Hat to Cover Open Source Collaboration at Gov’t Symposium; Paul Smith Comments
    Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) is set to hold its annual symposium on federal information technology on Nov. 9 where the company will host discussions on open source collaboration and its potential benefits for government, GovCon Executive reported Oct. 11.
  • Red Hat’s Container Technologies and Knowledge Were Chosen by SoftBank to Embrace DevOps
    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that several of Red Hat’s open source technologies, including Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, as well as the knowledge of Red Hat Consulting, were chosen by SoftBank Corp (“SoftBank”), a subsidiary of SoftBank Group Corp., to implement DevOps methodology for its Service Platform Division, IT Service Development Division, Information Technology Unit, and Technology Unit, the company’s in-house IT organization. This large, varied organization develops, maintains and operates SoftBank’s IT systems for internal work and operations, supporting 600 diverse systems.
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Security: Google Play, WPA2, FERC, HackerOne

  • 8 'Minecraft' apps infected with Sockbot malware on Google Play found adding devices to botnet

    Security researchers have discovered that at least eight malware-laced apps on Google Play Store are ensnaring devices to a botnet to potentially carry out distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) and other malicious attacks. These apps claimed to provide skins to tweak the look of characters in the popular Minecraft: Pocket Edition game and have been downloaded as many as 2.6 million times.

  • KRACK Vulnerability: What You Need To Know
    This week security researchers announced a newly discovered vulnerability dubbed KRACK, which affects several common security protocols for Wi-Fi, including WPA (Wireless Protected Access) and WPA2. This is a bad vulnerability in that it likely affects billions of devices, many of which are hard to patch and will remain vulnerable for a long time. Yet in light of the sometimes overblown media coverage, it’s important to keep the impact of KRACK in perspective: KRACK does not affect HTTPS traffic, and KRACK’s discovery does not mean all Wi-Fi networks are under attack. For most people, the sanest thing to do is simply continue using wireless Internet access.
  • FERC sets rules to protect grid from malware spread through laptops
    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Thursday proposed new mandatory cybersecurity controls to protect the utility system from the threat posed by laptops and other mobile devices that could spread malicious software. The standards are meant to "further enhance the reliability and resilience of the nation's bulk electric system" by preventing malware from infecting utility networks and bringing down the power grid, according to the nation's grid regulator.
  • Hack These Apps And Earn $1,000 — Bug Bounty Program Launched By Google And HackerOne
  • Security Vulnerability Puts Linux Kernel at Risk

Smartphone Waste and Tizen News